[Humanist] 32.55 events: markup; creating 'prospects' and 'promenades'

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed May 30 07:40:56 CEST 2018


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 32, No. 55.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Mia <mia.ridge at gmail.com>                                 (50)
        Subject: Talk in London/online: 5 June 2018 – Lizzie Stewart –
                English designed landscapes, c. 1550-1660: using 3D-GIS to
                recreate ‘prospects’ and ‘promenades’

  [2]   From:    Tommie Usdin <btusdin at mulberrytech.com>                   (20)
        Subject: [ANN] Call for Late-Breaking News - Balisage 2018


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 29 May 2018 15:29:59 +0100
        From: Mia <mia.ridge at gmail.com>
        Subject: Talk in London/online: 5 June 2018 – Lizzie Stewart – English designed landscapes, c. 1550-1660: using 3D-GIS to recreate ‘prospects’ and ‘promenades’


On June 5, the IHR Digital History seminar is delighted to present:

English designed landscapes, c.1550-1660: using 3D-GIS to recreate
'prospects' and 'promenades'

Sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English designed landscapes were
artificially organised to optimise the experience within them. In
particular, this was achieved through “prospects”, a concept of viewing
landscapes, and “promenades”, involving the physical movement through the
landscape. Authors like Henry Wotton, in 1624, emphasised the importance of
experience through “the Feete [and] likewise of the Eye”, and this would
consequently reflect the landowners’ individual perspectives towards the
landscape.

However, little analysis has been attempted into determining the
characteristics of “prospects” and “promenades” at specific sites. The
destruction and modernisation of estate landscapes has hindered their
analysis and reshaped perceptions of their appearance and development. From
my ongoing PhD research, this paper will therefore explore the
historiography of designed landscapes from this period whilst demonstrating
how 3D-GIS has the capabilities to improve our knowledge of this area of
research.

As a new computational tool for producing 3D representations of estate
landscapes, 3D-GIS can provide the geographical and historicalcontext to
spatially analyse the experience within them using ‘viewshed’ and animation
tools. This paper will subsequently demonstrate how 3D-GIS will contribute
to not only the study of designed landscapes but of historic landscapes
generally.

Biography
Elizabeth Stewart is a 3rd-year PhD researcher and Associate Tutor in the
School of History at the University of East Anglia, where she also
completed her BA and MA degrees. She is a landscape historian and also has
experience in archaeology, museums and heritage. She specialises in Digital
Humanities, and is funded by the Digital Humanities strand of the Eastern
Arc Research Consortium (EARC). As a continuation of her masters’
dissertation, her PhD research focuses on using 3D-GIS to explore and
analyse ‘prospects’ and ‘promenades’ within English designed landscapes
from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

The seminar is 5:15 pm – 6:15 pm, 5 June 2018. Attend in-person or watch
online:

Seminars are held in Room 203 (the John S Cohen Room), second floor,
Institute of Historical Research,

North block, Senate House, University of London
 http://www.history.ac.uk/contact . Find Senate House on Malet Street
 http://www.history.ac.uk/contact , London, WC1E 7HU.

Attendees are welcome to join the convenors and speaker for a post-seminar
drink in a nearby venue.

[...]

Best wishes,

The Digital History Seminar convenors - Tessa Hauswedell (UCL), Justin
Colson (Essex), Richard Deswarte (UEA), Mia Ridge (British Library), Adam
Crymble (Hertfordshire), Matthew Phillpott (IHR), Melodee Beals
(Loughborough), James Baker (Sussex).



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 29 May 2018 12:59:46 -0400
        From: Tommie Usdin <btusdin at mulberrytech.com>
        Subject: [ANN] Call for Late-Breaking News - Balisage 2018


Call for Late-breaking News: Balisage 2018!

The peer-reviewed part of the Balisage 2018 program has been
scheduled (https://www.balisage.net/2018/Program.html). The
committee left a few spaces for late-breaking news. If you 
want to speak at Balisage 2018 NOW IS THE TIME to write
up your idea; proposals are due July 6. 

Guidelines: https://www.balisage.net/latebreaking-call.html

Your proposal should be either:

a) really late-breaking (it reports on something that happened in
the last month or two) or

b) a well-developed paper, an extended paper proposal, or a very
substantial abstract on a topic related to markup and not already 
on the 2018 conference program.

Read more about Balisage 2018:  https://www.balisage.net/
Questions or submissions: info at balisage.net

==================================================
Balisage: The Markup Conference 2018          mailto:info at balisage.net
July 31 - August 3, 2018                       http://www.balisage.net
Preconference Symposium: July 30, 2018                 +1 301 315 9631
==================================================





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