[Humanist] 31.798 events: architecture of the Holocaust; hermeneutics in history

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed May 2 07:20:37 CEST 2018


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 798.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Gerben ZAAGSMA <gerben.zaagsma at uni.lu>                    (45)
        Subject: CFP: International conference + workshop: Digital
                Hermeneutics in History: Theory and Practice

  [2]   From:    Francesco Borghesi <francesco.borghesi at sydney.edu.au>     (16)
        Subject: Sydney Digital Humanities: Paul Jaskot next week


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 1 May 2018 10:16:52 +0000
        From: Gerben ZAAGSMA <gerben.zaagsma at uni.lu>
        Subject: CFP: International conference + workshop: Digital Hermeneutics in History: Theory and Practice


CFP: International conference + workshop: 
Digital Hermeneutics in History: Theory and Practice
Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH).
18-19 October 2018.

The Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH) is organising a two day conference and workshop on occasion of the official launch of the Ranke.2 project, its teaching platform for Digital Source Criticism.

The conference and workshop will revolve around the concept of “digital hermeneutics”, defined as the critical and self-reflexive use of digital tools and technologies for the development of new research questions, the testing of analytical assumptions and the production of sophisticated scientific interpretations.

This two-day event will address both the theory and practice of digital hermeneutics,

  *
Day 1 will have the format of a ‘traditional’ conference with sessions dedicated to  the four key aspects of the concept of digital hermeneutics: source criticism, tool criticism, algorithmic criticism and interface criticism.
  *
Day 2 will consist of workshops where participants will discuss the challenges of introducing digital history training in the history curriculum and will demonstrate best practices in an interactive setting.

For the conference day we invite abstracts for individual papers of 30 minutes or complete sessions of 90 minutes. The maximum amount of words for individual papers is 500; in case of a session please submit a 500 word introduction with abstracts of the session’s papers of 300 words.

Possible topics include:

  *reflections on hermeneutics in the digital age
  *source criticism versus digital source criticism
  *tool criticism
  *algorithmic criticism
  *interface criticism
  *pedagogical approaches to teaching digital history from an educational science perspective

For the workshop day we invite proposals for sessions that can last from 90 to 120 minutes, and that should contain a clear objective of what the workshop aims to accomplish. The proposal should describe the envisaged interaction with and take away for participants, which could be in the form of practical guidelines or example case studies that can be emulated.

Possible topics include:

  *The role of Learning Management Systems (Moodle, Blackboard, Canvas) in digital skills teaching
  *Digital storytelling through the use of tools
  *Teaching source criticism; tool criticism; algorithmic criticism; interface criticism


Proposals can be sent to: digitalhermeneutics2018 at gmail.com. For any further questions please email Dr. Gerben Zaagsma: gerben.zaagsma at uni.lu.

Timeline:

  *15 June 2018: deadline for proposals
  *30 June 2018: notification of results
  *30 July 2018: programme online
  *18-19 October 2018: conference + workshops


Dr. Gerben Zaagsma
Senior Researcher | Head of Research Area Digital History & Historiography
Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH)

Université du Luxembourg

Maison des Sciences Humaines
11, Porte des Sciences
L - 4366 Esch-Belval

M: gerben.zaagsma at uni.lu<mailto:gerben.zaagsma at uni.lu>
T: +352 466644 6208
W: www.c2dh.uni.lu
W: http://gerbenzaagsma.org






--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 1 May 2018 11:34:33 +0000
        From: Francesco Borghesi <francesco.borghesi at sydney.edu.au>
        Subject: Sydney Digital Humanities: Paul Jaskot next week
        In-Reply-To: <PDCVDU3-LCSL-GU0U-FKT-O5G8XBQBLWZ at sydney.edu.au>


Sydney Digital Humanities Research Group

A Plan, a Testimony, and a Digital Map: 
Analyzing the Architecture of the Holocaust

Public lecture

Presenter: Paul Jaskot, Director, Wired! Labs, Duke University
Time: 6-7pm
Date:Thursday, 10th May 2018
Location: Philosophy Room S249, The Quadrangle

The Holocaust was a profoundly spatial experience that involved not only the movement of millions of European Jews but also their confinement and murder in sites specifically built for the genocide. Paul Jaskot’s talk addresses how perpetrators thought of their building projects and, conversely, how victims experienced these oppressive spaces. Analyzing the architecture of the Holocaust helps us in understanding the larger development, implementation, and context of this crucial event. In addition to an architectural plan and a specific survivor testimony as examples, the lecture also explores how recent methods in the Digital Humanities - particularly digital mapping - can be used to investigate plans and testimonies to raise new questions about the architectural and historical significance of the Holocaust.

Trouble in the Database: Precision and Ambiguity in Historical Sources

Workshop

Presenter: Paul Jaskot, Director, Wired! Labs, Duke University
Date: Friday, 11 May 2018
Time: 2- 4pm
Location: Fisher Exhibition Meeting Rm 223, Fisher library

This workshop will offer a presentation and discussion of working with precision and ambiguity in historical sources. We will begin with an overview of the problem by looking at the case study of analyzing spatial information derived from an historical architectural journal and the problems and possibilities for visualization and analysis that such a source allows. The workshop will then move to open discussion of strategies and possibilities for working with ambiguity using digital methods.





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