[Humanist] 31.797 events: computational linguistics; digital libraries; the Moog

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue May 1 07:44:03 CEST 2018


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 797.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Alix Keener <alixkee at umich.edu>                           (57)
        Subject: ACRL Digital Scholarship Section Preconference at ALA Annual
                in New Orleans

  [2]   From:    Aliya Reich <areich at clir.org>                             (30)
        Subject: Time is running out: 2018 DLF Forum, Learn at DLF, and Digital
                Preservation CFPs close May 7!

  [3]   From:    Jon Agar <jonagar2000 at HOTMAIL.COM>                        (16)
        Subject: Trevor Pinch on the Moog synthesiser as technological and
                sound object, public JBS Haldane Lecture at UCL, 6 June 2018

  [4]   From:    Stan Szpakowicz <szpak at eecs.uottawa.ca>                  (103)
        Subject: Third call for papers: The 2nd Joint SIGHUM Workshop on
                Computational Linguistics for Cultural Heritage, Social
                Sciences, Humanities and Literature


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2018 10:21:18 -0400
        From: Alix Keener <alixkee at umich.edu>
        Subject: ACRL Digital Scholarship Section Preconference at ALA Annual in New Orleans


Deconstructing Digital Scholarship Consultations in the Library 
(http://www.ala.org/acrl/conferences/deconstructingdigitalscholarship)
ACRL Digital Scholarship Section Preconference

Friday, June 22, 2018 | 12:30 – 4:00 p.m. | New Orleans, LA

If you're a liaison librarian or functional specialist curious about how to
translate your skills and approaches to reference interviews into
strategies for consulting on digital scholarship topics, this hands-on
preconference is for you!

Learn an overview of the digital scholarship landscape in different
emerging topical areas, including research data management, digital
humanities, and geospatial data. Delve into breakout sessions featuring
hands-on exercises working through different scenarios drawn from the
facilitators' personal experiences. All attendees will leave the
preconference with a consultation toolkit that you will be able to
reference after the preconference has concluded.

Deconstructing Digital Scholarship Consultations in the Library ACRL
Digital Scholarship Section Preconference

Friday, June 22, 2018 | 12:30 – 4:00 p.m. | New Orleans, LA

If you're a liaison librarian or functional specialist curious about how to
translate your skills and approaches to reference interviews into
strategies for consulting on digital scholarship topics, this hands-on
preconference
 http://www.ala.org/acrl/conferences/deconstructingdigitalscholarship  is
for you!

Learn an overview of the digital scholarship landscape in different
emerging topical areas, including research data management, digital
humanities, and geospatial data. Delve into breakout sessions featuring
hands-on exercises working through different scenarios drawn from the
facilitators' personal experiences. All attendees will leave the
preconference with a consultation toolkit that you will be able to
reference after the preconference
 http://www.ala.org/acrl/conferences/deconstructingdigitalscholarship  has
concluded.

Learning Outcomes

Preconference participants will be able to...

·       Articulate how digital scholarship fits into higher education and
why academic libraries are engaging in digital scholarship

·       Identify similarities and differences between a traditional
reference interview and a digital scholarship consultation

·       Identify expertise you already bring to a digital scholarship
consultation (e.g., reference interview skills, knowledge of scholarly
communication)

·       Articulate basics of project management, including elements of a
project plan

·       Build confidence and self-efficacy as digital scholarship
consultants

[...]

Complete details are online
 http://www.ala.org/acrl/conferences/deconstructingdigitalscholarship .
Questions? Contact Margot Conahan at mconahan at ala.org.

<https://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl> <https://instagram.com/ala_acrl/>
<https://twitter.com/ALA_ACRL> <https://www.pinterest.com/acrlala/>

-- 
Alix Keener
Digital Scholarship Librarian
University of Michigan Library
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5606-9176
she/her/hers

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2018 15:11:59 +0000
        From: Aliya Reich <areich at clir.org>
        Subject: Time is running out: 2018 DLF Forum, Learn at DLF, and Digital Preservation CFPs close May 7!



Have you been thinking carefully over your ideas for this year’s DLF Forum and affiliated events since we announced our Call for Proposals in March, but not yet had a chance to submit? This is the week - time is nearly out! All CFPs close on May 7 at 11:59pm Pacific Time.


Submit today for your chance to participate in our events this fall in Las Vegas:


  *   our brand-new Learn at DLF <https://forum2018.diglib.org/learnatdlf/> pre-conference (#learnatdlf, October 14);
  *   the DLF Forum <https://forum2018.diglib.org/call-for-proposals/> (#DLFforum, October 15-17);
  *   NDSA’s Digital Preservation 2018 <http://ndsa.org/meetings/> (#digipres18, October 17-18).


Learn at DLF, our new pre-conference, will be structured entirely as a workshop day. Through engaging, hands-on sessions, attendees will gain experience with new tools and resources, exchange ideas, and develop and share expertise with fellow community members. Learn more and check out the CFP here: https://forum2018.diglib.org/learnatdlf/


The DLF Forum, our signature event, includes digital library practitioners from member institutions and the broader community, for whom it serves as a meeting place, marketplace, and congress. In these respects, the event is an opportunity for attendees to conduct business, present work, share experiences and practices, support information sharing, and assess DLF’s programs and progress with community input. Anasuya Sengupata <http://sanmathi.org/anasuya/>, co-director and co-founder of Whose Knowledge?, <https://whoseknowledge.org/> will open the 2018 DLF Forum with a talk titled, “Decolonizing Knowledge, Decolonizing the Internet: An Agenda for Collective Action.” Learn more and check out the CFP here: https://forum2018.diglib.org/


And, to round out the week, NDSA’s Digital Preservation 2018: In/visible Work, will help to chart future directions for both the National Digital Stewardship Alliance and digital stewardship, and is expected to be a crucial venue for intellectual exchange, community-building, development of best practices, and national-level agenda-setting in the field. Snowden Becker  <https://snowdenbecker.com/>, lecturer and manager of the graduate degree program in audiovisual archiving and preservation in UCLA’s Department of Information Studies, will open Digital Preservation 2018 <http://ndsa.org/meetings/> with a talk titled, “To See Ourselves as Others See Us: On Archives, Visibility, and Value.” Learn more and check out the CFP here: http://ndsa.org/meetings/


Submit for one conference or all three (though, different proposals for each, please)! Session options range from 60-second Minute Madness sessions at DigiPres to daylong workshops at Learn at DLF, with many options in between.


The deadline for all three opportunities is May 7 at 11:59pm Pacific Time.  <http://conftool.pro/dlf2018>


Thank you so much for reading! If you have any questions, please write us at forum at diglib.org <mailto:forum at diglib.org>. We’re looking forward to seeing you in Las Vegas!


-Team DLF

P.S. Want to stay updated on all things #DLFforum? Subscribe to our Forum newsletter <https://diglib.us7.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=eaecb8b1da252a4794c594ff1&id=556a33972b>, “like” us on Facebook, or follow us at @CLIRDLF <https://twitter.com/CLIRDLF> on Twitter!


-----------
Aliya Reich
Program Assistant for Conferences and Events
The Digital Library Federation
1707 L Street NW, Suite 650, Washington, DC 20036
443-671-4212
diglib.org <http://diglib.org/> | clir.org <http://clir.org/>

--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2018 15:51:18 +0000
        From: Jon Agar <jonagar2000 at HOTMAIL.COM>
        Subject: Trevor Pinch on the Moog synthesiser as technological and sound object, public JBS Haldane Lecture at UCL, 6 June 2018


Rescheduled - JBS Haldane Lecture: Prof. Trevor Pinch - The Moog Synthesiser as Technological and Sound Object.

30 April 2018

Following our postponement from last year, the Department of Science and Technology Studies is pleased to announce our second JBS Haldane lecture of the year, with Prof. Trevor Pinch (Cornell) giving his talk "From Technology Studies to Sound Studies: The Moog Synthesiser as Technological and Sound Object"

The lecture will take place from 6pm on Wednesday 6th June, in the JZ Young Lecture Theatre, Dept. of Anatomy, Gower Street, UCL .

The talk is open to the public, and tickets are free. If you wish to attend, please register on our Eventbrite page.
<https://www.eventbrite.com/e/prof-trevor-pinch-from-technology-studies-to-sound-studies-the-moog-synthesizer-as-technological-tickets-33307492607?aff=utm_source%3Deb_email%26utm_medium%3Demail%26utm_campaign%3Dnew_event_email&utm_term=eventname_text>

Sound Studies is a newly emergent interdisciplinary field which studies the material production, transmission, storage, and consumption of music, sound, noise, and silence and how these have changed throughout history and within different societies. In this lecture Trevor will examine how a new electronic soundscape came into being with a new instrument, the Moog Electronic Music Synthesizer. He will tell the story of this invention in upstate New York in 1964-9 and place it within the context of wider developments in electronic music and the counter-cultural sixties. His approach uses work in Science and Technology Studies to better understand the history of musical instruments as sounding objects, documenting how certain sounds stabilized as part of a new electronic soundscape and how other sounds failed to do so.

Biography

Professor Trevor Pinch's main research centres on three areas: the sociology of technology and how users engage with technology, sound studies and music and in particular the development of musical instruments and sound objects, markets and the economy with specific attention to the study of selling and persuasion.

He is also a performing musician with the Electric Golem<https://www.facebook.com/electricgolem/>, alongside James Spitznagel.

Any questions? Please contact sts at ucl.ac.uk.

<https://www.eventbrite.com/myevent?eid=33307492607>
________________________________
UCL Department of Science and Technology Studies
0207 679 1328 office | +44 207 679 1328 international
sts at ucl.ac.uk | www.ucl.ac.uk/sts | @stsucl



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2018 18:58:33 -0700
        From: Stan Szpakowicz <szpak at eecs.uottawa.ca>
        Subject: Third call for papers: The 2nd Joint SIGHUM Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, Humanities and Literature


LaTeCH-CLfL 2018:
The 2nd Joint SIGHUM Workshop on Computational Linguistics for 
Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, Humanities and Literature

to be held in conjunction with COLING 2018 in Santa Fe, NM, USA

https://sighum.wordpress.com/events/latech-clfl-2018/

Third Call for Papers

Organisers: Beatrice Alex, Stefania Degaetano-Ortlieb, Anna Feldman, 
Anna Kazantseva, Nils Reiter, Stan Szpakowicz

LaTeCH-CLfL 2018 is a second joint meeting of two communities with 
overlapping research goals and a similar research focus. The SIGHUM 
Workshops on Language Technology for Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, 
and Humanities (LaTeCH) have been a forum for researchers who develop 
new technologies for improved information access to data from the 
broadly understood humanities and social sciences. The ACL Workshops on 
Computational Linguistics for Literature (CLfL) have focussed on 
applications of NLP to a wide variety of literary data. The first joint 
workshop (LaTeCH-CLfL 2017) brought together people from both 
communities. We count on this workshop to broaden the scope of our work 
even further, and to encourage new common research initiatives.

A highlight of the workshop will be Ted Underwood 
<https://tedunderwood.com/>’s invited talk.

Topics and Content

In the Humanities, Social Sciences and Cultural Heritage communities, 
there is increasing interest in and demand for NLP methods for semantic 
annotation, intelligent linking, discovery, querying, cleaning and 
visualization of both primary and secondary data; this is even true of 
primarily non-textual collections, given that text is also the pervasive 
medium for metadata. Such applications pose new challenges for NLP 
research, such as noisy, non-standard textual or multi-modal input, 
historical languages, multilingual parts within one document, lack of 
digital resources, or resource-intensive approaches that call for 
(semi-)automatic processing tools and domain adaptation, or, as a last 
resort, intense manual effort (e.g., annotation).

Literary texts bring their own problems, because navigating this form of 
creative expression requires more than the typical information-seeking 
tools. Examples of advanced tasks include the study of literature of a 
certain period or sub-genre, recognition of certain literary devices, or 
quantitative analysis of poetry. More generally, there is a growing 
interest in computational models whose results can be interpreted in 
meaningful ways.

A common forum is mutually beneficial to NLP experts, data specialists, 
digital humanities researchers, and those who study literature. The 
second edition of the joint workshop has something for everyone in all 
such communities. We invite contributions on these, and closely related, 
topics:

-- adapting NLP tools to Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, and 
to the humanities including literature;
    automatic error detection and cleaning of textual data;
    building and analyzing social networks of literary characters;
    complex annotation schemas, tools and interfaces;
    dealing with linguistic variation and non-standard or 
historical use of language;
    discourse and narrative analysis/modelling, notably in literature;
    emotion analysis for the humanities and for literature;
    fully- or semi-automatic creation of semantic resources;

-- generation of literary narrative, dialogue or poetry;
    identification and analysis of literary genres;
    linking and retrieving information from different sources, 
media, and domains;
    modelling dialogue literary style for generation;
    modelling of information and knowledge in the Humanities, 
Social Sciences, and Cultural Heritage;
    profiling and authorship attribution;
    research infrastructure and standardisation efforts in the 
Humanities, Social Sciences, and Cultural Heritage;
    searching for scientific and/or scholarly literature.


Information for Authors

We invite papers on original, unpublished work in the topic areas of the 
workshop. In addition to long papers, we will consider short papers and 
system descriptions (demos). We also welcome position papers.

 Long papers, presenting completed work, may consist of up to eight (8) 
pages of content, with two (2) additional pages of references.

 A short paper / demo can present work in progress, or the description 
of a system, and may consist of up to four (4) pages of content, with 
one (1) additional page of references.

 A position paper -- clearly marked as such -- should not exceed six 
(6) pages including references.

All submissions are to use the ACL stylesheets (either .sty and .bst or 
.dot). Papers should be submitted electronically, in PDF, via the 
LaTeCH-CLfL2018 submission website:

https://www.softconf.com/coling2018/ws-LaTeCH-CLfL2018/

Reviewing will be double-blind. Please do not include the authors’ names 
and affiliations, or any references to Web sites, project names, 
acknowledgements and so on -- anything that immediately reveals the 
authors’ identity. Self-references should be kept to a reasonable 
minimum, and anonymous citations cannot be used.

Accepted papers will be published in the workshop proceedings, and later 
available in the ACL Anthology.

Important Dates

Paper submission deadline: May 25, 2018
Notification of acceptance: June 20, 2018
Camera-ready papers due: June 30, 2018
Workshop date: August 20 or August 25, 2018

More on the Organisers

Beatrice Alex, School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh
Stefania Degaetano-Ortlieb, Language Science and Technology, Saarland 
University
Anna Feldman, Department of Linguistics & Department of Computer 
Science, Montclair State University
Anna Kazantseva, National Research Council of Canada
Nils Reiter, Institute for Natural Language Processing (IMS), Stuttgart 
University
Stan Szpakowicz, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 
University of Ottawa



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