[Humanist] 30.756 persuasive projects

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Feb 18 07:50:47 CET 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 756.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Gabriel Egan <mail at gabrielegan.com>                       (17)
        Subject: Re:  30.754 persuasive projects?

  [2]   From:    "Lynch, John" <jlynch at humnet.ucla.edu>                    (47)
        Subject: Re:  30.754 persuasive projects?

  [3]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (27)
        Subject: persuasive projects

  [4]   From:    Tara Mcpherson <tmcphers at usc.edu>                         (37)
        Subject: Re:  30.754 persuasive projects?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 10:17:31 +0000
        From: Gabriel Egan <mail at gabrielegan.com>
        Subject: Re:  30.754 persuasive projects?
        In-Reply-To: <20170217061220.328678A11 at digitalhumanities.org>

Sinai Rusinek asks us to identify:

 > three examples for a DH research, and/or a
 > project that was groundbreaking (asks the decision
 > maker), preferably recent, not shallow (grunts
 > the humanist colleague), understandable (by both)
 > that actually involved humanists and preferably
 > mainly humanist work

My votes would go to:

1) Google Translate

2) IBM's Watson

3) The Oxford English Dictionary

It's a pity that all three are commercial projects
rather than directly state-funded. But so much
commercial activity gets indirect state funding
that the distinction is rather artificial.

Regards

Gabriel Egan



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 14:30:41 +0000
        From: "Lynch, John" <jlynch at humnet.ucla.edu>
        Subject: Re:  30.754 persuasive projects?
        In-Reply-To: <20170217061220.328678A11 at digitalhumanities.org>


I’m pretty impressed by Tim Tangherlini’s recent work on fake news: http://www.cdh.ucla.edu/news-events/the-internet-narrative-and-truth/. He’s a folklorist, and teamed up with a data scientist and a public health researcher to look at how myths about vaccines spread through social networks. It is timely, and it couldn’t possibly have been done without the humanities expert.

Sincerely,

John A. Lynch, Ph.D. | Academic Technology Manager
UCLA CENTER FOR DIGITAL HUMANITIES
(310) 206-5630

--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 14:58:12 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: persuasive projects
        In-Reply-To: <20170217061220.328678A11 at digitalhumanities.org>


My nomination is for a project with which I am involved, more as 
observer and commentator than participant, though I like to think that 
my commenting is participatory: the Virtual St Paul's Cathedral Project 
(http://virtualpaulscrossproject.blogspot.co.uk), for which the fons et 
origo is John N. Wall (North Carolina State).

But before getting in the proverbial lift/elevator and finding that 
resistant colleague, my imagined persuader would have to have read 
Wall's essay, "Gazing into imaginary spaces: Digital modeling and the 
representation of reality", New Technologies in Medieval and Renaissance 
Studies 6 (2016). The website's clicking-gazing-reading would not be 
enough to prepare my persuader; slow reading and mulling over of the 
essay would be needed. And, I think, that says something about how 
a project is communicated. Is it the case that important digital things 
require intelligent use for their import to be understood, hence textual 
commentary for them to be understood by a non-participant observer?

If I were to come up with a caveat, it would orbit that word 
'representation' in the title of the essay. What I think is the most 
dangerous and exciting aspect of this project is that its trajectory 
leaves representation far behind. Were I the accidental persuader, 
that's the point at which I'd want to be putting the emphasis.

Yours,
WM
-- 
Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
Humanities, King's College London; Adjunct Professor, Western Sydney
University and North Carolina State University; Editor,
Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (www.tandfonline.com/loi/yisr20)


--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 19:08:29 +0000
        From: Tara Mcpherson <tmcphers at usc.edu>
        Subject: Re:  30.754 persuasive projects?
        In-Reply-To: <20170217061220.328678A11 at digitalhumanities.org>


This link does not provide much deep context, but the Holocaust mapping work of Anne K. Knowles and Paul Jaskot is a good example from the realm of GIS.    Jaskot has written about this in perceptive ways.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/07/27/arts/spatial-maps.html?_r=0

Best,

Tara


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