[Humanist] 30.755 events: the Nebraska Forum; data-intensive science cfp

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Feb 17 07:14:07 CET 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 755.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Stefano Canali <stefano.canali at PHILOS.UNI-HANNOVER.DE>    (39)
        Subject: CFP Data-Intensive Science, Hannover, October 26-27

  [2]   From:    Katherine Walter <kwalter1 at unl.edu>                       (31)
        Subject: Nebraska Forum on Digital Humanities


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 14:51:26 +0100
        From: Stefano Canali <stefano.canali at PHILOS.UNI-HANNOVER.DE>
        Subject: CFP Data-Intensive Science, Hannover, October 26-27
        In-Reply-To: <da839504-0bc5-43dd-862f-8ba3f86ce5e4 at Spark>


First Call for Papers

Making sense of data in the sciences: philosophical perspectives on the methodology, epistemology and practices of data-intensive science

Workshop
October 26-27
Leibniz Universität Hannover (Germany)
Website: dataintensivescience.wordpress.com

Confirmed Speakers
Stefano Canali (Leibniz Universität Hannover)
Gregor Halfmann (University of Exeter)
Koray Karaca (Universiteit Twente)
Sabina Leonelli (University of Exeter)
Wolgang Pietsch (Technical University of Munich)
Federica Russo (Universiteit van Amsterdam)
Judith Simon (University of Hamburg)

Call for Papers
Discussions on the role of data in the sciences have acquired a central position in current philosophy of science. As part of a wider critical debate on the rhetoric of ‘big data’, philosophical discussions are now focused on the practices involved in the use of data in specific scientific disciplines, documenting challenges and benefits of working with data and studying the ethical dimensions of what is known as “data-intensive science”.
This workshop is aimed at promoting and further expanding this line of research, by focusing on a number of particularly important questions for the debate:
Discussions on these issues will follow a practice-based approach to philosophy of science, thus aiming at studying actual contexts of practice in the sciences, as well as at improving and advancing scientific practice itself by highlighting its potentially problematic aspects.

How to submit an abstract
Philosophers of science and researchers from other areas with interests in these issues, including PhD candidates and early career researchers, are encouraged to submit an abstract of up to 500 words.
Abstract should be sent in anonymised version to permit blinded review. Please state your name, affiliation and title of the abstract only in the body of your email.
The final deadline for abstract submission is 2 June 2017.

• What is the role played by ‘traditional’ aspects of scientific research (e.g. experiments, causal discovery, etc.) in data-intensive science?
• Which kind of practical and methodological issues are part of scientific practices involved in the use of (big) data?
• Which modes of integration are made necessary by the need of using different kinds of data regarding significantly different phenomena?
• Which role should we conceive for values in data-intensive science?
• Does data-intensive science entail new aspects of responsibility? If so, which notion of responsibility do we need and which aspects should we highlight?

Please send your contributions to admissions at philos.uni-hannover.de.

Bursaries
We applied for funding and we hope to be able to offer support to help cover the travel costs for contributed speakers.

Registration
Registration is free, but please send an email to Stefano Canali to register: stefano.canali at philos.uni-hannover.de.

Organisation and Contact
The workshop is organised by Stefano Canali, Mathias Frisch and Thomas Reydon, Institute of Philosophy, Leibniz Universität Hannover.
For any queries please contact Stefano Canali: stefano.canali at philos.uni-hannover.de.

_________________________
Stefano Canali
PhD student, Leibniz University Hannover
@StefanoCanali_ | Academia.edu | DFG research group | Department profile



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 16:20:17 +0000
        From: Katherine Walter <kwalter1 at unl.edu>
        Subject: Nebraska Forum on Digital Humanities
        In-Reply-To: <F2ED1C99-AB75-43B4-8B68-9E31D873BE14 at unl.edu>


The Center for Digital Research in the Humanities at the University of Nebraska is pleased to announce the fifth annual Nebraska Forum on Digital Humanities<http://cdrh.unl.edu/neforum>, entitled “Breaking Down Barriers: Social Justice, Cultural Memory, and the Digital Humanities,” to be held April 6-7, 2017 in Lincoln, Nebraska. April 6th events are open to the public.  To register for April 7th events, see http://cdrh.unl.edu/neforum

This year’s Nebraska Forum on Digital Humanities will feature scholars and projects that foster meaningful engagement with diverse, typically under-represented communities. We hope to encourage the digital humanities community to create and employ critical technologies and methodologies in concert with and in relationship to more public forms of scholarship. The participants are each involved in projects and research that work to uncover traditionally silenced or under-represented communities, challenging systems of discrimination. With this forum, we hope to encourage the digital humanities community to create and employ critical technologies and methodologies in concert with and in relationship to more public forms of scholarship. These projects provide potential models of engagement using the digital medium to move scholarship and scholarly activity through communities. Topics of discussion will include: What contributions can digital scholars offer community-based social justice initiatives? What new audiences for digital scholarship are there and how do they form? How do digital projects circulate scholarly work in communities? What are the implications of engaging in public-facing scholarship?

The forum will open with a keynote panel and reception on Thursday, April 6th at the UNL Center for Great Plains Studies<http://www.unl.edu/plains/welcome>. April 6th events are open to the public.
On Friday, April 7th, invited scholars will share their research and engage in discussion. Speakers are:

T. L. Cowan
Assistant Professor, Digital Cultural Practices, Department of Arts, Culture and Media and Faculty of Information, University of Toronto. Cowan was a 2016-17 Presidential Visiting Fellow and Digital Humanities Fellow at Yale University. Cowan is currently co-director with Moya Bailey of the Center for Solutions to Online Violence <http://femtechnet.org/csov/> (CSOV), which is a collaborative project between the Digital Alchemists and the Feminist Technology Network<http://femtechnet.org/csov/>. She is developing Cabaret Commons<http://beta.cwrc.ca/project/cabaret-commons>—a digital project creating a hybrid curated and user-generated digital archive of live performance that works towards a responsive, dynamic and ethical model of performance archives online, one that documents performers and performances and attends to the central role of audiences in sustaining grassroots trans- feminist and queer cultures.

Jim Gerencser
College Archivist, Waidner-Spahr Library, Dickinson College, Co-Director of the Carlisle Indian School Digital Resource Center<http://carlisleindian.dickinson.edu/>. This project aims to develop a fully searchable, comprehensive database of Carlisle Indian School resources, including the US National Archives, Bureau of Indian Affairs records pertaining to the Carlisle Indian School. Gerencser is interested in increasing digital access to Dickinson College’s unique resources, and has participated in many digital projects that highlight special collections resources. He is an active member of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference, and previously served as Treasurer.

Emily Hainze
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Heyman Center for the Humanities, Columbia University. Hainze is a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia's Justice-in-Education Initiative, where she is involved in two digital projects centered on incarceration and the criminal justice system. Her book project focuses on the literary and cultural history of the women's prison as it was established as a separate institution in the late 19th and early 20th century US. Prior to her graduate study at Columbia, she investigated police misconduct for the City of New York. She was a recipient of the Mellon CLIR Fellowship for Dissertation Research in Original Sources from 2013-14. As a public humanities fellow at Columbia's Heyman Center for the Humanities, Hainze worked to develop an online repository for digitized archival records of women and imprisonment, with an eye towards classroom use. Hainze was formerly one of the participants in The Prison Public Memory Project<http://www.prisonpublicmemory.org>.

Christy Hyman
Director of GPUMC Archives-Cochrane-Woods Library at Nebraska Wesleyan University; Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. A native of North Carolina, Hyman's research focuses on the societal and ideological tensions inherent in the United States South during the nineteenth century. Her current study is a digital narrative that emphasizes the spatial dimensions of enslaved runaway flight in eastern North Carolina’s Great Dismal Swamp region from 1805-1840. Her dissertation research documents and explores the imagined and physical spaces of 'hiding' that enslaved people used to resist enslavement. In particular, Hyman traces the local spaces of laying away that played an active, ongoing, repetitive role in slave societies and how the enslaved configured these spaces.

Susan A. Rose
Charles A. Dana Professor of Sociology, Director of the Community Studies Center, Dickinson College, Co-Director of the Carlisle Indian School Digital Resource Center<http://carlisleindian.dickinson.edu/>. This project aims to develop a fully searchable, comprehensive database of Carlisle Indian School resources, including the US National Archives, Bureau of Indian Affairs records pertaining to the Carlisle Indian School. Rose specializes in the sociology of religion, family, and education; violence; indigenous studies; and inequality, race, and gender studies. Her recent book, The Carlisle Indian Industrial School: Indigenous Histories, Memories, and Reclamations, was named one of the Philadelphia Inquirer’s Best Books of 2016.

Adam Rothman
Professor of History, Georgetown University, Principal Curator of the Georgetown Slavery Archive, a project of Georgetown University’s Working Group on Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation. This project is researching and compiling the archival materials related to Jesuit slaveholding and the 1838 sale of 272 slaves to Louisiana. Rothman’s recent book, Beyond Freedom’s Reach: A Kidnapping in the Twilight of Slavery, has been named a Humanities Book of the Year by the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, and it has received the Jefferson Davis Book Award from the American Civil War Museum, and the Margaret T. Lane/Virginia F. Saunders Memorial Research Award from the Government Documents Roundtable of the American Library Association. Rothman is also an OAH distinguished lecturer.

Brandi M. Waters
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History and African American Studies, Yale University. She is a Digital Humanities Fellow at the DHLab at Yale. She specializes in colonial Latin American history. Waters is interested in the influence of slavery on developing legal and medical institutions in Latin America and the Atlantic World. Her current project examines the impact of slavery on institutional approaches to disability in New Granada (Colombia) and Philadelphia in the late eighteenth-century, and specifically how enslaved people shaped perceptions of physical and mental disabilities while adapting to different legal, cultural, and demographic settings.


Forum chairs are Emily J. Rau, Assistant Editor, Willa Cather Archive (http://cather.unl.edu)  and William G. Thomas III, Professor of History and John and Catherine Angle Professor in the Humanities at the University of Nebraska.


Katherine L. Walter
Co-Director, Center for Digital Research in the Humanities
Professor and Chair, Digital Initiatives & Special Collections
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
319A Love Library
Lincoln, NE 68588-4100
402-472-3939
kwalter1 at unl.edu








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