[Humanist] 30.889 masterclasses & workshops

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Apr 12 07:17:06 CEST 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 889.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Boon Tim <Tim.Boon at SCIENCEMUSEUM.AC.UK>                   (70)
        Subject: CFP: 'The evolution of the museum' - Science Museum, London,
                13-14th July 2017

  [2]   From:    Karl Grossner <karl.geog at gmail.com>                       (90)
        Subject: workshop (2nd call): Spatial Humanities meets Spatial
                Information Theory

  [3]   From:    Jack Kavanagh <Jack.Kavanagh at nuim.ie>                     (23)
        Subject: Virtual Worlds as Digital Scholarly Editions Masterclass -
                June 13th - 14th 2017

  [4]   From:    Jack Kavanagh <Jack.Kavanagh at nuim.ie>                     (17)
        Subject: Participatory Engagement in Digital Humanities Projects -
                June 29th - 30th 2017


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2017 12:02:08 +0000
        From: Boon Tim <Tim.Boon at SCIENCEMUSEUM.AC.UK>
        Subject: CFP: 'The evolution of the museum' - Science Museum, London, 13-14th July 2017


CALL FOR PAPERS: 'THE EVOLUTION OF THE MUSEUM'

'The Evolution of the Museum' - Science Museum, London, 13-14th July 2017
A workshop in the 'Universal Histories, Universal Museums' project funded by the AHRC 'Care for the Future: Thinking Forward through the Past' and the LABEX 'Pasts in the Present' programmes.

https://universalhistories.org/

Call for Papers

Museums are emergent entities - and the evolution of a museum is dependent
on a number of factors, including: changes in collecting and disposal
practices, redisplays and the legacy of temporary exhibitions. New
pedagogical perspectives relating to new questions or ideological trends,
either in museology or in the disciplines represented in the collections,
are also influential.

This workshop will focus on selected case studies to analyse the impact of
these changes on methodological issues relating to universal histories and
universal museums. In particular, the evolution of the museum will be
discussed in relation to the impact of temporary exhibitions and the
circulation of knowledge in the public sphere. The workshop will explore
how social knowledge practices influence the structuring of institutional
knowledge, and the emergence of new disciplines.

The case studies that we will use to trace this evolution over time are the
1876 Loan Collection of Scientific Apparatus at the South Kensington Museum
and the creation of the Musée d'Ethnographie du Trocadéro.

The 1876 Loan Exhibition is a temporary exhibition which took place in 1876
at the South Kensington Museum and was one of the founding displays which
led to the creation of the Science Museum. This exhibition offers an ideal
case study for the ways in which temporary displays have a permanent legacy
in national and international museum collections, and how far the
interpretation and presentation of materials was transformed in this
process.

The Musée d'Ethnographie du Trocadéro opened in 1882 following the 1878
International Exhibition, for which the Trocadéro palace had been built.
Though many studies have focused on the successive transformations of this
museum in the Musée de l'Homme and, successively, the Musée du Quai Branly
and the MUCEM, the first assemblage and display of these ethnographic
collections is less well known. Drawing on the place given to the arts, the
regions, and different themes in universal exhibitions in Paris, and
particularly in the 1878 exhibition, the discussion of the Musée
d'Ethnographie will cast new light on the motivations and relationships of
collectors, learned societies, politicians, and publics in informing the
creation of this museum.

The workshop will bring together researchers from ethnography, history of
science, and museum history, to explore the evolution of museums, mainly -
but not only - in France and the UK. The workshop will also contain a
session with the objects studied in the Universal Histories and Universal
Museums project. We invite papers and posters exploring the agencies and
reception of these two institutions and their collections. Contributions
might consider, but need not be confined to, the following themes:

History and/or comparison of the science and art collections in the South
Kensington Museum, and the foundation of the Science Museum

History of ethnographic collections in Paris (and direct comparisons with
other cities and particularly with London) and of the first Musée
d'Ethnographie du Trocadéro

The impact of temporary exhibitions and universal exhibitions on the
creation and development of museum collections.

Important information:

Papers - abstract: 300 words (30 minutes papers)
Poster presentations - abstract: 300 words
Deadline for both abstracts: 30th April 2017.

Send abstracts to: universalhistoriesmuseums at gmail.com<mailto:universalhistoriesmuseums at gmail.com>.

Please direct any enquiries to: research at sciencemuseum.ac.uk<mailto:research at sciencemuseum.ac.uk>

Authors will be notified by the 12th May.
Note that we will aim to publish the workshops of the 'Universal Histories,
Universal Museums' research project as a journal special issue.

Tim

Dr Tim Boon,
Head of Research & Public History,
The Science Museum,
Exhibition Road,
London
SW7 2DD

Read our free E-Journal: http://journal.sciencemuseum.org.uk/



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2017 08:40:04 -0600
        From: Karl Grossner <karl.geog at gmail.com>
        Subject: workshop (2nd call): Spatial Humanities meets Spatial Information Theory


SPHINx 2017  
http://sphinxworkshop.org/  Workshop (2nd call)

SPatial Humanities meets Spatial INformation Theory:
Space, Place, and Time in Humanities Research

A pre-conference workshop at COSIT 2017  http://www.cosit2017.org/

September 4, 2017
L'Aquila, Italy

CALL FOR PAPERS (*submission deadline 12 May*)

------------------------------------------------------------

Humanities disciplines such as history, classical studies, literary
studies, and philology have in recent years experienced a “spatial turn
 http://spatial.scholarslab.org/spatial-turn ” similar to that begun in
prior decades within the social sciences and archaeology. Many researchers
in these fields are now explicitly recording the spatial and temporal
attributes of their data and mapping them for visual analysis and
argumentation. In many cases they are also performing spatial or
spatial-temporal computations, including but not limited to viewshed,
network, and cluster analyses, and agent-based and other models and
simulations are increasingly common. The software used for this work is the
same as that used for the environmental and social sciences: desktop GIS
and specialized spatial and natural language processing libraries for the
Python and R languages. These new spatial researchers are experiencing the
same representational and analytic challenges in studying geographical
dynamics that are well known to other disciplines, but they also face
distinctive issues related to the nature of historical humanities data.
Furthermore, epistemologies associated with new quantitative approaches
must be reconciled with their traditional methodological practices.

Spatial information theorists and geographic information scientists have
not normally drawn from humanities research cases for their development of
theoretical models or the specific software and systems built upon such
models. It is our belief the time is ripe for fruitful dialog between these
groups.

To further and encourage such dialog, we invite papers that explicitly
address one or more of these distinctive issues, particularly in the
context of active or recent humanities research:

   - computing over sparse and uncertain data, e.g., the life courses of
   historical individuals
   - comparing and conflating conflicting assertions about the same
   phenomena from multiple sources
   - representing and analyzing place as experienced space
   - theorizing historical events and processes and their formal
   representation as spatial-temporal data, in simple, useful indexing and
   reasoning systems
   - building digital historical gazetteers, challenges for which include:
      - automated and machine-assisted discovery of place references in
      historical texts
      - place and place-name disambiguation
      - representing not only real‑world places but fictional or
      speculative ones
   - formalizing complex spatio-temporal relations (e.g., topological) in
   texts; modeling entities with evidence of multi-space, multi-time properties
   - integrated methods for performing textual analysis with spatial
   analysis
   - scaling of discovery methods for aggregate analyses on very large
   collections
   - place sentiment analysis
   - computational narrative analysis as it relates to space and place
   - cartographic representations of historical textual information

SUBMISSIONS

We are accepting short paper submissions (6-8 pages, including tables,
figures, and references) on the topics of interest described above. We
encourage paper submissions from researchers working on these issues from
any disciplinary perspective. All articles must be prepared using either
the Springer Word Document Template or the Springer Latex Document Template
(contributed books): https://www.springer.com/gp/authors-editors/book-aut
hors-editors/manuscript-preparation/5636. More general information for your
camera-ready manuscript preparation can be found in the Manuscript
Guidelines and Key Style Points and on the website of Springer.

The workshop proceedings will be published in a combined volume with the
other COSIT workshop proceedings. It will be published by Springer, in the
series Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography (
http://www.springer.com/series/7418 ).

Submissions should be made through the EasyChair website at the following
link: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sphinx2017.

IMPORTANT DATES

Papers due: May 12
Notification of acceptance: June 16
Camera-ready papers due: June 28
Workshop date: September 4

CONTACT

Please feel free to contact the workshop co-organizers. We are:

Ben Adams
University of Canterbury
benjamin.adams at canterbury.ac.nz

Karl Grossner
World Heritage Web
karlg at worldheritageweb.org

Olga Chesnokova
University of Zurich
olga.chesnokova at geo.uzh.ch



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2017 16:56:06 +0000
        From: Jack Kavanagh <Jack.Kavanagh at nuim.ie>
        Subject: Virtual Worlds as Digital Scholarly Editions Masterclass - June 13th - 14th 2017


The aim of this two-day Masterclass, funded by the DiXIT Scholarly Editions Inital Training Network, is to bring together experts from the fields of Heritage 3D Visualisation and Digital Scholarly Editing to create a common vocabulary between the two disciplines. This Masterclass will explore and problematise the affordances of Virtual Worlds within the theories and methodologies of digital scholarly editing, including the constructing, annotating, reviewing, and evaluating VWs as texts.

In the last three decades, computer-based 3D modelling and visualisation in cultural heritage has enabled the (re)construction of artefacts, buildings, and landscapes as a process of producing and sharing knowledge about the past. However, critics have emphasised their ambiguous nature and their high visual stimulus that deceive users into thinking that these are precise accounts of past reality based on material evidence, historical sources, and scientific methods. Over the years, there have been several attempts to illustrate ambiguity and make the process of production more transparent; non-photorealistic rendering, digital annotations, parameterisation, alternative reconstructions, colour coding, different levels of transparency, quantification of uncertainty, and even a series of theoretical principles, such as the London and Seville Charters, have been suggested and/or employed to overcome the problematic nature of 3D modelling in heritage visualisation.

Over the past twenty five years there has been an evolving body of scholarship exploring the standards, theories, and methodologies of digital scholarly editing producing an  ever-growing body of research exploring what this new medium could bring to the study of the transmission of texts, and thus editorial practice normative to this environment. While much of the emphasis of digital editions has been on texts that can be expressed in machine readable text (either originally in print or manuscript), and their transmission history, the theories and methods informing textual scholarship can be extended to all forms of texts, verbal, visual, or oral.

By bringing together scholars from the two fields we will explore a series of theoretical and practical issues pertaining to the creation, annotation, and publication of virtual worlds with the ultimate aim to marry the practices of both communities in the creation of  new three-dimensional editions that will address the following:

  *   How do we consider virtual worlds as texts?
  *   What is the textuality of the virtual world?
  *   How do we retain the immersion of virtual worlds while providing comprehensive in-world documentation?
  *   How do we document ambiguity?
  *   How do we make the process of production transparent?
  *   What does an apparatus look like in a virtual world?
  *   If virtual worlds are the new editions, how are they going to be reviewed and evaluated?

Participation

This MasterClass is aimed at people with experience in the fields of Heritage 3D Modelling and Visualisation and Digital Scholarly Editing. Submissions are especially encouraged from early career researchers with past and current projects that would benefit from knowledge and skills on the creation of virtual worlds as digital scholarly editions. Participants should bring a laptop and should ensure that their projects will be accessible to other participants - either online or by bringing 3D files to the masterclass.

The MasterClass will be limited to 12 participants. Preference will be given to applicants whose area of expertise falls under one or more of the topics covered during the Masterclass and those who work or have worked in the past on Digital Scholarly Editions or 3D visualisation projects. The event is open to Irish, European, and international applicants. Accommodation and transportation will be covered for all selected participants up to a maximum of €250 for participants based in the Republic of Ireland and up to €500 for participants outside Ireland. Meals for all days of the event will also be covered.

Application Process

Please send by the April 19th using the Google Form<https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf7LQGQMs3BzhDdEQZKXpEExQYPDhNUsUj4aK8Pkxea2Ih-cA/viewform>

  *   CV clearly highlighting the projects related to the theme of the Masterclass
  *   Personal statement outlining the ways that this Masterclass could benefit your current work and research interests

All applicants will be notified by April 24th.

The Masterclass is funded by
Digital Scholarly Editions Initial Training Network







--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2017 17:00:21 +0000
        From: Jack Kavanagh <Jack.Kavanagh at nuim.ie>
        Subject: Participatory Engagement in Digital Humanities Projects - June 29th - 30th 2017 


This two-day masterclass, supported by DARIAH and Humanities at Scale, will explore how participatory engagement is increasingly being considered a key component in the design of digital humanities projects. As a concept and method, it has a wider reach than crowdsourcing, and signals a more collaborative relationship between researchers, the research process, and the community it serves. While this mode of engagement can be empowering and impactful, it also raises a number of concerns:

  *   Identifying the stakeholders;
  *   Ethics and exploitation;
  *   Legal environments;
  *   Resources and project sustainability;
  *   Measuring the impact;
  *   From participation to scholarly output

This masterclass will offer a platform for discussion of these ideas bringing together those interested in these topics, as both practitioners and theorists. A goal of this Masterclass will be to arrive at a classification of various forms of participation and knowledge production, providing a window onto the issues of creating and managing a participatory engagement digital humanities projects.

Participation

This masterclass is aimed individuals who have an active and/or demonstrable interest in public engagement projects and/or citizen science initiatives. Submissions are especially encouraged from early career researchers and from those from European countries the Humanities at Scale project serves. i.e., countries who do not have a strong tradition of digital humanities research.

It will be limited to 12 participants. Preference will be given to applicants whose area of expertise falls under one or more of the topics covered during the Masterclass and who are currently working or who have worked in the past on participatory engagement projects. The event is open to Irish, European, and international applicants. Accommodation and transportation will be covered for all selected participants up to a maximum of €250 for participants based in the Republic of Ireland and up to €500 for participants outside Ireland. Meals for all days of the event will also be covered.

Application Process

Interested applicants should send a current CV and an expression of interest here <https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScIQU1cOyBEex-jxgyn2QvKMLlyLtTJ7vfLzgzVfhNEjcMoog/viewform>. Deadline for applications is April 30 2017.

This Masterclass is funded by
Humanities at Scale








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