[Humanist] 28.905 Content Mine: humani nihil a me alienum puto?

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Apr 24 07:27:46 CEST 2015


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 905.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 15:32:53 +0200
        From: John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>
        Subject: Content Mine launches

Dear Humanists,

The Content Mine has launched:
contentmine.org
@TheContentMine
For a good intro to it:
http://blogs.ch.cam.ac.uk/pmr/2015/04/16/thecontentmine-is-ready-for-business-and-will-make-scientific-and-medical-facts-available-to-everyone-on-a-massive-scale/

As stated in title of that post, the aim is to make "scientific and 
medical facts available to everyone on a massive scale." This will be 
done through automated text mining of scientific literature for facts, 
and then connecting and organizing these facts.

The obvious question is: (how) can this relate to the humanities?

The political aspect, that the right to read is the right to mine, is 
obviously a very welcome point of concurrence for both STEM and 
humanities, as is the stress on open source and open access, i.e. 
general access to the tools and the data.

The investigative aspect is another matter. Of course, there is 
numerical data in, for example, history journals; this can be extracted, 
and perhaps related where there are common dimensions (time, place, metric).

But beyond that I'm not sure.* Thoughts?

*(I may well be guilty of wanting to play with the shiny new toy.)

John

-- 
John Levin
http://www.anterotesis.com
http://twitter.com/anterotesis





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