[Humanist] 27.846 events: many & various

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Mar 5 09:21:47 CET 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 846.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Alan Liu <ayliu at english.ucsb.edu>                         (23)
        Subject: 4Humanities livestreamed event on "Global Humanities," March
                12, 2014

  [2]   From:    EAGLE Project <info at EAGLE-NETWORK.EU>                     (37)
        Subject: EAGLE to hold a conference on Digital Cultural Heritage in
                Paris. CfP and Registration open

  [3]   From:    "E. Natalie Rothman" <rothman at utsc.utoronto.ca>          (131)
        Subject: Deadline extended on Call for Participants: Roots & Routes
                Summer Institute

  [4]   From:    Leif Isaksen <leifuss at googlemail.com>                     (68)
        Subject: CfP - Telling stories with maps: the geoweb, qualitative GIS
                and narrative mapping, Hestia2 @Birmingham, 30 April 2014

  [5]   From:    "Young, John K" <youngj at MARSHALL.EDU>                     (12)
        Subject: 2014 STS Conference Registration


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2014 08:36:50 -0800
        From: Alan Liu <ayliu at english.ucsb.edu>
        Subject: 4Humanities livestreamed event on "Global Humanities," March 12, 2014


GLOBAL HUMANITIES?

4Humanities.org will host a live-streamed event on "Global Humanities?" on
March 12, 2014, noon-1:30 pm Pacific Standard Time. The featured
participant will be Rens Bod, professor of digital humanities at University
of Amsterdam, who will engage online with Alan Liu, David Marshall (Dean of
Humanities & Fine Arts, University of California, Santa Barbara ), and
others at UC Santa Barbara on the question of the humanities and global
humanities.  The questions are:

How can we think comparatively about what the humanities mean in multiple
areas of the world with educational and funding systems not necessarily
commensurable with U.S.-style "liberal arts"?  For example, how are the
humanities and arts talked about elsewhere?  How are their histories and
traditions different?  How are they positioned relative to other
disciplines, institutions, and social sectors?  How are their different
functions interrelated--memorial, educational, critical, research-oriented,
etc.?  In both the past and the contemporary moment, how are humanities and
arts differently valued or challenged around the world?

The event will be livestreamed on YouTube from the event page at
http://bit.ly/1bfikOs

Suggested readings from Rens Bod's book and Geoffrey Galt Harpham's *The
Humanities and the Dream of America* are available from the event page
(request a login to download the readings from Lindsay Thomas:
lindsaythomas at umail.ucsb.edu ).



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2014 16:59:33 +0100
        From: EAGLE Project <info at EAGLE-NETWORK.EU>
        Subject: EAGLE to hold a conference on Digital Cultural Heritage in Paris. CfP and Registration open
        In-Reply-To: <N0T07G$4C3E192C25FB00E534071138ABB7DD72 at eagle-network.eu>


International Conference on Information Technologies for 
Epigraphy and Digital Cultural Heritage in the Ancient World

We warmly invite you to the EAGLE 2014 International Conference on
Information Technologies for Epigraphy and Digital Cultural Heritage in the
Ancient World. Hosted by EAGLE Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin
Epigraphy, École Normale Supérieure and Collège de France, Chaire
Religion, institutions et société de la Rome antique, it is the second in
a series of international events planned by this European and international
consortium.

The conference will be held September 29-30 and October 1, 2014, in Paris.
Keynote lectures will be delivered by Susan Hazan (The Israel Museum), Tom
Elliott (New York University) and Thomas Jaeger (European Commission).

Please post and distribute widely, and feel free to address any questions to
info at eagle-network.eu. For more information or to submit a proposals, visit
the conference website at http://tinyurl.com/prklbr9.

Thank you and Best Wishes!

The Eagle2014 Organisers

*** *** ***

Conference Web-Page: http://tinyurl.com/prklbr9

Call for Participation: http://tinyurl.com/ooajhzs

Important dates:

Submission of Panel proposals: 31 March 2014
Submission of Papers (full, short): 30 April 2014
Submission of Posters, projects, demos: 30 April 2014
Response to the Authors: 7 June 2014
Camera-ready versions: 30 June 2014
 

Follow EAGLE on Facebook and Twitter!

*** *** ***

EAGLE – Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy, will be a
new online archive for epigraphy in Europe, co-funded through the ICT -
Policy Support Programme of the European Commission. The EAGLE Best Practice
Network is part of Europeana, a multi-lingual online collection of millions
of digitised items from European museums, libraries, archives and
multi-media collections

*** Attachments:
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1393954921_2014-03-04_info@eagle-network.eu_8860.2.x-zip



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2014 11:50:46 -0500
        From: "E. Natalie Rothman" <rothman at utsc.utoronto.ca>
        Subject: Deadline extended on Call for Participants: Roots & Routes Summer Institute
        In-Reply-To: <N0T07G$4C3E192C25FB00E534071138ABB7DD72 at eagle-network.eu>


Roots & Routes: Summer Institutes on knowledge production 
in the premodern Mediterranean and in the Digital Age

**Please note that the deadline for applications has been extended to March
21.**

Dear colleagues and students,
 
We are delighted to announce the third of three annual Roots & Routes
Summer Institutes on knowledge production in the premodern Mediterranean and in
the Digital Age. The Institute, which will take place at the University of
Toronto Scarborough  from May 26th to June 3rd, 2014, is generously supported
by the University of Toronto's Connaught Fund and is completely free of charge
to all participants. We hope you can join us! Please read on for details on the
Institute's format, theme, and application procedure (or go directly to http://
ocs.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/utsc/RRSI3/ to apply).
 
 
Format:
 
Unlike traditional academic conferences, the Roots & Routes Summer
Institute features a combination of informal presentations, seminar-style
discussions of shared materials, hands-on workshops on a variety of digital
tools, and small-group project development sessions. Hosted by the University
of Toronto Scarborough, the institute welcomes participants from a range of
disciplines interested in engaging with digital scholarship; technical
experience is not a requirement. Graduate students (MA and PhD), postdoctoral
fellows and faculty are all encouraged to apply.
 
Through its exciting roster of activities the Institute encourages participants
to develop a more coherent and explicitly transdisciplinary analytical
framework for their scholarship using digital tools and methodologies.
Participants will explore new formats for conducting research and communicating
their findings. By teaming up with information technology specialists and
digital scholarship experts working outside the Mediterranean, participants
will have a chance to build long-term collaborative projects to enhance their
ongoing individual research agendas. In order to maximize the potential for
future collaboration and broad, thematic conversations, groups will be composed
of participants from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and at different
stages of their scholarly careers, from senior scholars to advanced
undergraduates. Participants are encouraged to engage each other's materials,
bring insights from their own fields of expertise to a broader methodological
and conceptual discussion, and begin to draw out connections between what are
often seen as disparate fields of knowledge.
 
 
Annual Theme:
 
This year's theme, "Sociability and Materiality," aims to capture a range of
historical problems and their attendant methodological and epistemological
challenges. Participants are invited to define and approach this theme from the
position of their individual disciplines and research interests. For example,
what place does "the Mediterranean" have in discussions about manuscript,
print, and digital cultures and their interpretation? What can historians, art
historians, archaeologists, and other scholars learn from one another when
tackling these problems? (How) are themes such as sociability and materiality
useful in the study of the premodern Mediterranean? How does the recent
resurgence in the history of material culture speak to longer-term interest
among historians of the book in the materiality of textual artifacts?How can
attention to materiality and sociability make salient the various practices of
knowledge production of different disciplinary traditions, and what do such
practices entail? What new ways of envisioning archives (as processes as well
as products) are being facilitated by digital technologies? How do digital
media and methodologies change the ways in which we identify, access, and
interpret historical records? What might "collaborative research" in digital
environments have to learn from (and teach) the history of earlier forms of
scholarly sociability?
 
 
Bottom of Form
Application Guidelines:
 
To apply, please go to our online registration site, http://
ocs.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/utsc/RRSI3/. Applicants should submit
by March 21, 2014 a CV and a brief proposal (up to 600 words) that includes a
discussion of their current research and a specific object they would like to
present and further develop digitally. This object may be a text, an artifact,
a dataset, or a cluster of any of the above. Once accepted, participants will
be asked to compile a bibliography of relevant readings to share with others in
advance, as well as to install and become familiar with a few digital tools
(e.g. Zotero), to allow us to explore more advanced features and digital skills
at the institute itself. Participants are not expected to have prior
programming knowledge or other advanced digital skills, but should be genuinely
interested in the potential of digital tools to challenge and transform current
research practices. 
 
Selection announcements will be made by March 30, 2014.
 
**Participation in the Institute is free of charge. Travel and accommodation
bursaries may be available for out-of-town graduate students. ** 
 
For more information about the Institute, check out our website: http://
serai.utsc.utoronto.ca/rrsi2014.
 
Please contact the organizers at rrsi2014[at]utsc.utoronto.ca for further
information or to get involved in the organizing process.
 
 
Concurrent Local Events:
 
We encourage and aim to facilitate interaction between the Roots and Routes
Summer Institute attendees and the following concurrent local events. Details
to follow.
 
Berkshire_Conference_of_Women_Historians
"Histories on the Edge / Histoires sur la br?che"
May 22-25, 2014 
Toronto, Canada
http://berks2014.com
 
In addition to an exciting roster of sessions on all aspects of the history of
women, gender, and sexuality, this year's Berks will feature a Digital Lab
where attendees will have an opportunity to interact with the people behind a
range of international digital history projects. Detailed program coming soon.
 
 
Congress_of_the_Humanities_and_Social_Sciences
"Borders without Boundaries"
May 24-30, 2014   
Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
http://congress2014.ca
 
In addition to over seventy scholarly associations meeting at Congress, this
year's Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI at Congress) will convene
Wednesday, May 28 to Friday, May 30 2014. For more details go to: http://
dhsi.org/events.php

___________
E. Natalie Rothman
Associate Professor of History
University of Toronto
rothman at utsc.utoronto.ca
http://blog.utsc.utoronto.ca/rothman
 



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2014 15:45:49 -0500
        From: Leif Isaksen <leifuss at googlemail.com>
        Subject: CfP - Telling stories with maps: the geoweb, qualitative GIS and narrative mapping, Hestia2 @Birmingham, 30 April 2014
        In-Reply-To: <N0T07G$4C3E192C25FB00E534071138ABB7DD72 at eagle-network.eu>


Telling stories with maps: the geoweb, qualitative GIS and narrative mapping
Digital Humanities Hub, University of Birmingham, 30 April 2014

Dear all

The third Hestia 2 workshop may well be of interest to folks on the list.

All the best

Leif

________________________________________

Call for papers

We are inviting contributions to this one-day workshop, organized as part
of the AHRC-funded Hestia2 initiative – a public engagement project based
on the spatial reading and visualizing of texts (http://hestia.open.ac.uk).
Among other activities, Hestia2 includes a seminar series aimed at
exploring the different ways in which humanistic approaches to data
visualization challenge and transform existing mapping practices. The first
two seminars covered network analysis techniques and digital
representations of data, respectively; this third seminar of the series
will examine the specific role of GIS in mapping texts of different kinds.

As Caquard (2013, 135) has noted, there has been considerable interest in
‘the relationship between maps and narratives’, especially in the context
of the spatial turn among literary and film scholars.  In many ways this
field is being driven by technological innovation, particularly the rise of
easy-to-use online mapping tools developed by companies like Google to
exploit location-based data; everyone can now map their story.
 Nonetheless, the standard critique of GIS is that it replicates a
Cartesian, positivist conception of the world through allocating geospatial
coordinates to objects.  This brings the temptation to ignore a technology
closely associated with domination and control, to see mapping purely as
metaphor rather than geospatial ‘grid’.  Geographers, particularly those
working in critical and qualitative GIS (e.g. Cope and Elwood 2009) have
dissected this critique and highlight the analytical potential of GIS for
those interested in qualitative data.  Just what does it mean then, to use
geospatial technologies to map people’s stories?

This one-day workshop seeks contributions exploring the intersection of GIS
technologies and qualitative data, in particular text and storytelling.
 Themes include but are not limited to:
-       Participatory GIS in narratives of community
-       Co-construction and GIS
-       The spatial turn and GIS
-       Storytelling and the geoweb
-       GIS and temporality
-       Network analysis and GIS
-       GIS and literary mapping

Abstracts of up to 250 words should be emailed to Phil Jones (
p.i.jones at bham.ac.uk) or Stefan Bouzarovski (
stefan.bouzarovski at manchester.ac.uk) by 14 March 2014.

best wishes,

elton

References
Caquard S 2013 Cartography I: mapping narrative cartography Progress in
Human Geography 37;1 135-144
Cope M and Elwood S (eds.) 2009 Qualitative GIS: a mixed methods approach
Sage, London

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Elton Barker, Reader in Classical Studies, The Open University, Milton
Keynes MK7 6AA

Newly published (with Joel Christensen): A Beginner's Guide to Homer (One
World publishers)
http://www.oneworld-publications.com/pbooks/homer-9781780742298

Follow me on twitter: @eltonteb
http://hestia.open.ac.uk/
 twitter: @hestiaproject
http://googleancientplaces.wordpress.com/
http://gap.alexandriaarchive.org/gapvis/index.html
http://pelagios-project.blogspot.com/
 twitter: @Pelagiosproject
http://www.classicsconfidential.co.uk/
twitter: @classicsconfide




--[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2014 23:06:54 +0000
        From: "Young, John K" <youngj at MARSHALL.EDU>
        Subject: 2014 STS Conference Registration
        In-Reply-To: <N0T07G$4C3E192C25FB00E534071138ABB7DD72 at eagle-network.eu>


Society for Textual Scholarship
2014 conference

Dear members of the STS community,

For those of you attending our 2014 conference in Seattle March 20-22, please note that this will be the final reminder to register in advance of the conference itself. You can do so online at: http://textualsociety.org/conference-registration-forms-and-information/. Those waiting to register on-site will not be able to guarantee their meal preferences for the banquet.

Thanks, and I hope to see you in Seattle,
John

Dr. John Young
Professor, Department of English
Marshall University
(304) 696-2349
youngj at marshall.edu<mailto:youngj at marshall.edu>
www.marshall.edu/english http://www.marshall.edu/english





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