[Humanist] 28.185 on collaborative writing

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Jul 8 01:59:03 CEST 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 185.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 08:48:18 +0000
        From: David Berry <D.M.Berry at sussex.ac.uk>
        Subject: Re:  28.184 on collaborative writing
        In-Reply-To: <20140707021539.4CB6E6222 at digitalhumanities.org>


Hi

I thought I might draw your attention to an interesting writing method called "Book Sprints" which I have been involved in. It is extremely creative and a rapid writing process that is a useful complement to the "slow" and single author writing that humanities scholars typically engage in. More info here:

http://data.booksprints.net/books/On_Book_Sprints_v1_1.pdf

Best

David

Sent from my iPhone

Sent from my iPhone
> On 7 Jul 2014, at 03:32, "Humanist Discussion Group" <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:
> 
> 
>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 184.
>            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> 
> 
> 
>        Date: Mon, 07 Jul 2014 12:06:27 +1000
>        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>        Subject: on collaborative writing
> 
> Those here who collaborate or are only interested in the subject of 
> collaboration will be interested in the CRASSH blog posting by Joe 
> Parent and Joe Uscinski for 19 June, "Of Coauthoring" 
> (http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/blog/post/of-coauthoring). These co-authors 
> note six "things that worked for us--many of which worked for us after 
> not doing them definitely didn't work":
> 
> 1. Ground rules first ("nailing down how the labor and credit will be 
> split")
> 2. Things fall apart (projects tend to get out of hand; life intervenes)
> 3. It's not about you (managing relationships is the key to success)
> 4. Trust your partner ("Coauthors come together because they're 
> complements")
> 5. The infinite veto ("authors can block any material they're 
> uncomfortable with")
> 6. Don't track changes ("the track changes function... bears the cloven 
> stamp of Satan")
> 
> Comments? How much of this applies to collaborative project
> work?
> 
> Yours,
> WM
> -- 
> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
> Humanities, King's College London, and Research Group in Digital
> Humanities, University of Western Sydney





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