[Humanist] 27.343 learning from the DHO

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sun Sep 15 09:44:41 CEST 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 343.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Joris van Zundert <joris.van.zundert at huygens.knaw.nl>     (58)
        Subject: Re:  27.341 what can we learn from the DHO's disappearance?

  [2]   From:    "Jim O'Donnell" <cassiodorus at gmail.com>                   (48)
        Subject: Re:  27.341 what can we learn from the DHO's disappearance?

  [3]   From:    Jacque Wernimont <jacque.wernimont at gmail.com>             (49)
        Subject: Re:  27.341 what can we learn from the DHO's disappearance?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2013 12:26:57 +0200
        From: Joris van Zundert <joris.van.zundert at huygens.knaw.nl>
        Subject: Re:  27.341 what can we learn from the DHO's disappearance?
        In-Reply-To: <20130914101121.A5E52306B at digitalhumanities.org>


I know this is the extremely easy take, but still: isn't this as simple as
initial funding running out? Weren't most centres based on one off funding
for 4 or 5 years, with institutional hand waiving about further funding if
etc.? The question then is: why were many centres not able to transfer to a
sustainable business model? I can't blame them. Humanities based
researchers and professionals are not exactly power money people able to
pay, nor afforded by their home institutions to pay the contributions
needed to sustain e.g. training curricula, digital data archiving,
e-publications.

Best
--Joris

On Saturday, September 14, 2013, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>
>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 341.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org<javascript:;>
>
>
>
>         Date: Fri, 13 Sep 2013 12:44:40 +0100
>         From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk<javascript:;>
> >
>         Subject: disappearance of the DHO
>
> I'm almost certainly not the only one to wonder why it is that
> institutional units of digital humanities have for decades failed to
> last. Several greats of the past (e.g. Oxford, Bergen, Toronto,
> Princeton-Rutgers) and many smaller, more local centres have come and
> gone. Some of us have talked about organizing a session for one of the
> DH conferences to unearth and discuss the reasons. Since these reasons
> would involve living persons and academic politics the issues are
> sensitive. But surely this should not put us off the trail of a rather
> important question for the survival of new centres today.
>
> Alan Liu has asked, "Where is the cultural criticism in digital
> humanities?"
> Perhaps some variety of cultural criticism should be applied to the
> question of the DHO. What can we learn from its disappearance?
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
> Humanities, King's College London, and Research Group in Digital
> Humanities, University of Western Sydney

-- 
Drs. Joris J. van Zundert
*Researcher & Developer Digital and Computational Humanities
*
Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands
*Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences
*
www.huygens.knaw.nl/en/vanzundert/

-------
*Jack Sparrow: I thought you were supposed to keep to the code.
Mr. Gibbs: We figured they were more actual guidelines.
*



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2013 08:58:45 -0400
        From: "Jim O'Donnell" <cassiodorus at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  27.341 what can we learn from the DHO's disappearance?
        In-Reply-To: <20130914101121.A5E52306B at digitalhumanities.org>


So make the case for the DHO.  For the list, then, a canvass:  what
are the three or five most significant works of original scholarship
produced in the digital humanities?  That is to say, works of original
research or criticism that have made a difference to the way scholars
working in the field and those influenced by them beyond the field
know or think about some domain of humanistic inquiry.  Where is the
Art of Shakespeare's Sonnets or Renaissance Self-Fashioning or
Surprised by Sin or Poetic Closure or Edel's Henry James or
Epistemology of the Closet or Syme's Roman Revolution or Brown's
Through the Eye of a Needle or Worldly Goods or Proust's Lesbianism or
Voyagers to the West or The Mediterranean or The Corrupting Sea, as
begotten and made in the domain of digital humanities?

Second question:  is my first question a fair question to ask?

Jim O'Donnell



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2013 15:29:29 -0700
        From: Jacque Wernimont <jacque.wernimont at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  27.341 what can we learn from the DHO's disappearance?
        In-Reply-To: <20130914101121.A5E52306B at digitalhumanities.org>


Willard,

I think this is a great question and certainly one that came up for me when
I read the news. We're in the process of envisioning a center for the
Claremont Consortium and our conversations often entail long-term planning
processes. I sometimes find myself wondering if we need to be creating
something that will last forever (or even for a long while). Is there no
way that Kathleen Fitzpatrick's notion of planned obsolescence might be
helpful even when thinking about institutional structures?

It seems more difficult to imagine asking various funding sources for
support for something designed to end, but I also think it's a useful
thought experiment, if nothing else. I'm eager to hear the thoughts of
others as well.

Warmly,
Jacqueline



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