[Humanist] 27.313 historical documents on project management

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Sep 4 07:11:12 CEST 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 313.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Joris van Zundert <joris.van.zundert at huygens.knaw.nl>     (29)
        Subject: Re:  27.311 historical documents on project management

  [2]   From:    Amanda French <amanda at amandafrench.net>                   (48)
        Subject: Re:  27.308 historical documents on project management


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 3 Sep 2013 12:09:52 +0200
        From: Joris van Zundert <joris.van.zundert at huygens.knaw.nl>
        Subject: Re:  27.311 historical documents on project management
        In-Reply-To: <20130903061249.3FB473044 at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear Geoffrey,

Just to add to what was said about the Agile Manifesto… That manifesto was
a major backlash to the ubiquity of 'Waterfall' style project management
methods rising in the 70s and 80s. 'Waterfall' being the illusion that
projects will be nicely planned and managed in a single pass set of
neat knowable steps towards a guaranteed result. Experience has it that
no such projects nor planning exist.

There is some proof that the popularity of waterfall models is actually due
to a massive and critique-less misinterpretation of a paper by Winston
Royce: "Managing Large Software Systems", Proceedings of IEEE Westcon,
1970. Craig Larman in "Agile & Iterative Development: A Manager's Guide"
(Addison-Wesley, 2004) has an interesting account on that infamous
misinterpretation, and does justice to Royce's actual inclination towards
more flexible management principles (pp.102–107).

Best
--Joris



-- 
Drs. Joris J. van Zundert
*Researcher & Developer Digital and Computational Humanities
*
Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands
*Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences
*
www.huygens.knaw.nl/en/vanzundert/

-------
*Jack Sparrow: I thought you were supposed to keep to the code.
Mr. Gibbs: We figured they were more actual guidelines.
*



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 03 Sep 2013 14:49:16 -0400
        From: Amanda French <amanda at amandafrench.net>
        Subject: Re:  27.308 historical documents on project management
        In-Reply-To: <mailman.1.1378202402.21501.humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org>


Hi Geoffrey et al.,

The project management workshop that Tom Scheinfeldt taught a few times 
at THATCamp has one of the most detailed set of collaborative notes 
taken in Google Docs that I've ever seen: "Project Management BootCamp," 
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uofGfhCDpu2DK1bKstkEqyK2hwbV4PNy4S-PmfPIWvk/edit?usp=sharing 

See also a shorter and narrower document titled "The Four P's of Digital 
Project Outreach" written by CHNM's Sheila Brennan for the recent One 
Week One Tool institute: 
http://www.lotfortynine.org/2013/08/four-ps-of-digital-project-outreach/

When I was in college, I worked at a department store, and we were shown 
one of those John Cleese management videos, all about how to give good 
customer service. It has definitely stuck with me, and I wouldn't swear 
that it hasn't affected my work on THATCamp ...

Cheers,

Amanda

Amanda L. French, Ph.D.
http://amandafrench.net

Email: amanda at amandafrench.net
Cell: 720-530-7515
Twitter: @amandafrench
Skype: amandafrenchphd
AIM: habitrailgirl

>>
>>        Date: Fri, 30 Aug 2013 13:01:13 -0600
>>        From: Geoffrey Rockwell <grockwel at ualberta.ca>
>>        Subject: Historical Documents for Project Management
>>
>> Dear Humanists,
>>
>> Can anyone suggest interesting readings for a course on project
>> management in the digital humanities. I am not looking so much for
>> contemporary advice on how to manage projects - there is certainly plenty
>> of that. I am looking for documents of historical importance in the
>> evolution of our thinking about project management or documents important
>> to the ways the digital humanities has come to think of itself as
>> involved in projects.
>>
>> Some examples I have found include "The Mythical Man-Month" essay by Fred
>> Brooks. Another is "The Project Manager" by Paul Gaddis which was
>> published in 1959 in The Harvard Business Review.
>>
>> To be frank I would welcome any suggestions that are well written,
>> accessible to graduate students, and which promote reflection on project
>> management and its discourses.
>>
>> Yours,
>>
>> Geoffrey Rockwell




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