[Humanist] 27.307 historical documents on project management

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sun Sep 1 09:55:31 CEST 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 307.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Susan Ford <susan.ford at anu.edu.au>                        (14)
        Subject: RE:  27.304 historical documents on project management?

  [2]   From:    "Alvarado, Rafael (rca2t)"                                (51)
                <rca2t at eservices.virginia.edu>
        Subject: Re:  27.304 historical documents on project management?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sat, 31 Aug 2013 09:09:45 +0000
        From: Susan Ford <susan.ford at anu.edu.au>
        Subject: RE:  27.304 historical documents on project management?
        In-Reply-To: <20130831080823.D239E3023 at digitalhumanities.org>


"Parkinson's Law" by C Northcote Parkinson 1958 is important for (public)
administration and hence project management. Wikipedia, at least, describes
it as a best seller and I remember its being on the bookshelf of my father -
a career public servant and earnest man - who recommended it to me (all his
daughters ended up in the Public Service) saying that he did not think the
principle had quite taken over in the APS yet.

Edward Tufte "Visual Explanations" 1997 contains a devastating analysis of
the sometimes pernicious effects of software on thinking, in this case of MS
Powerpoitn on engineering presentations for the NASA 1986 Challenger
project.

Susan
PhD candidate, Classics, Australian National University



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sat, 31 Aug 2013 14:11:53 +0000
        From: "Alvarado, Rafael (rca2t)" <rca2t at eservices.virginia.edu>
        Subject: Re:  27.304 historical documents on project management?
        In-Reply-To: <20130831080823.D239E3023 at digitalhumanities.org>


Geoff,

I would consider selections from Eric Raymond's _The Cathedral and the
Bazaar_ and Paul Graham's _Hackers and Painters_. Although these two
collections are not about project management per se -- they speak more
broadly to what I'd call the social organization of software development
-- I think they would be nice additions to your syllabus, even if each is
responsible for some cliched thinking about software development and the
hacking life. Each author speaks to many of the same issues that face DH
coders and coding projects, and I find them very sympathetic to the
synthetic project that underlies the digital humanities. They are
historically significant as well.

Raf

Rafael C. Alvarado, Ph.D.
Associate Director, SHANTI
University of Virginia
Alderman Library, Room 323
434 982 1029 | rca2t at virginia.edu

On 8/31/13 4:08 AM, "Humanist Discussion Group"
<willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 304.
>            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>        Date: Fri, 30 Aug 2013 13:01:13 -0600
>        From: Geoffrey Rockwell <grockwel at ualberta.ca>
>        Subject: Historical Documents for Project Management
>
>Dear Humanists,
>
>Can anyone suggest interesting readings for a course on project
>management in the digital humanities. I am not looking so much for
>contemporary advice on how to manage projects - there is certainly plenty
>of that. I am looking for documents of historical importance in the
>evolution of our thinking about project management or documents important
>to the ways the digital humanities has come to think of itself as
>involved in projects.
>
>Some examples I have found include "The Mythical Man-Month" essay by Fred
>Brooks. Another is "The Project Manager" by Paul Gaddis which was
>published in 1959 in The Harvard Business Review.
>
>To be frank I would welcome any suggestions that are well written,
>accessible to graduate students, and which promote reflection on project
>management and its discourses.
>
>Yours,
>
>Geoffrey Rockwell




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