[Humanist] 25.210 events: TEI; palaeography; cultural histories

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Aug 3 22:27:02 CEST 2011


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 25, No. 210.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Susan Brown <sbrown at uoguelph.ca>                         (102)
        Subject: CFP: Cultural Histories: Emergent Theories, Methods,and the
                Digital Turn

  [2]   From:    Shawn Day <day.shawn at GMAIL.COM>                           (18)
        Subject: TEI Members Meeting and Conference 2011

  [3]   From:    "Brookes, Stewart" <stewart.brookes at KCL.AC.UK>            (51)
        Subject: 'Digital Resources for Palaeography' Symposium: 5th
                September 2011...


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2011 23:16:22 -0400
        From: Susan Brown <sbrown at uoguelph.ca>
        Subject: CFP: Cultural Histories: Emergent Theories, Methods,and the Digital Turn


Dear colleagues,

Please find below a CFP for a conference next spring that I hope some of 
you will find it of interest. Please feel free to circulate to others.

All the best,
Susan Brown

Cultural Histories: Emergent Theories, Methods, and the Digital Turn
Organized by TransCanada Institute & Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory
University of Guelph
March 2 - 4, 2012

Keynotes: Alan Liu (University of California, Santa Barbara) 
Steven High (Concordia)

In both history and literary studies, critical theory and the cultural 
turn have called into question the role of narratives and metanarratives
of teleology and causation, and of monological or hegemonic voices in
scholarly constructions of the past. Be it a reading of the problems
of the past with an eye to possibilities in the future, a genealogical
analysis of the remains of the past, cultural ethnography channeled
through archives, or a critical rendering of a discipline's formation,
historical projects help us understand ourselves and the sites we
inhabit at the same time that they can cause ruptures and
discontinuities that unmoor familiar regimes of truth and the
instrumental and rational models that produce them. Writing cultural 
history has been progressively challenged by a range of intellectual
developments since the latter part of the twentieth-century. Critical
theory and the cultural turn have called into question the roles of
narratives and metanarratives, of teleology and causation, and of 
monological or hegemonic voices in scholarly constructions of the past.
The contemporary accelerated pace of change, the ephemerality of
eventful experience, and the relentless remediation of representations
of events in the age of digital information networks present new kinds
of challenges in relating the present to events of the recent past.
The shift towards digital scholarship further complicates historical
projects by offering a much larger potential "archive" of sources and
new tools for scholarly engagement. The current fascination with the
archive and its application to uncommensurable referents itself points
to a sea change in how we engage with, attempt to access, and inscribe
the past. Digital tools offer the chance to engage with the past using 
evidence on a much larger scale, as well as different modes of
representation than those possible with print media. Yet engaging with
the potential and perils of digital media requires dialogue with 
"analog" debates over how to engage in cultural history. This conference
aims to bring together literary scholars and historians to discuss the
impact of recent theoretical and methodological developments in our
fields and think of new directions.

This interdisciplinary conference is jointly sponsored by the
TransCanada Institute (www.transcanada.ca) and the Canadian Writing
Research Collaboratory /Le Collaboratoire scientifique des Écrits du
Canada (www.cwrc.ca) to foster debate on new modes and methods of
history and historiography, especially those employed or theorized by
cultural historians, literary historians, and critics.

Examples of topics or questions to be considered:
-- Historiography, historicism, and epistemic shifts
-- Cultural histories in the context of post/colonialism, diasporas, 
minoritized communities, and globalization
-- Writing about mega events (e.g., Olympics, G20 protests)
-- The writing of histories of literature, text technologies, and modes 
of cultural production
-- Digital interfaces for historical argument
-- Historicizing critical concepts, or institutional and/or 
disciplinary formations
-- Genres of cultural histories (e.g., literary history, chronicle, 
biography)
-- The histories of cities, of space, or place
-- Non-positivist histories, or speculative histories
-- Cultural histories of crisis and/or trauma, truth or reconciliation 
commissions
-- Activist historiography
-- Archives as sources, as textual constructs, as problems
-- Digital archive structures and their implications for cultural 
history
-- Histories of the ephemeral, the popular, or the representative

We invite proposals of no more than 300 words for twenty-minute papers
or panel proposals of three or more papers (nontraditional formats such
as 10-minute position papers or project demonstrations are welcome).

Organizing Committee: Susan Brown and Smaro Kamboureli (University of 
Guelph), co-chairs;
Catherine Carstairs (University of Guelph); Paul Hjartarson (University 
of Alberta); Katherine McLeod (Postdoctoral fellow, TransCanada Institute).

Deadline for abstracts: September 30, 2011
Notification of acceptance: October 30, 2011
Submission address: transcan at uoguelph.ca, or
Cultural Histories Conference, TransCanada Institute, 9 University 
Avenue East, University of
Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 1M8

A pdf version of this cfp is available at http://www.cwrc.ca


____________________________________________________________________

Susan Brown
Director, Orlando Project; Project Leader, Canadian Writing Research 
Collaboratory
Professor                  				
Visiting Professor
School of English and Theatre Studies  	English and Film Studies
University of Guelph          			
University of Alberta
Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 Canada     	Edmonton, Alberta T6G 
2E5

519-824-4120 x53266 (office)      		780-862-0155
519-766-0844 (fax)

sbrown at uoguelph.ca           			
susan.brown at ualberta.ca
http://orlando.cambridge.org http://www.ualberta.ca/ORLANDO

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 11:26:22 +0100
        From: Shawn Day <day.shawn at GMAIL.COM>
        Subject: TEI Members Meeting and Conference 2011
        In-Reply-To: <4E2FBAD9.30905 at gmail.com>

We invite you to the 2011 Annual Conference and Members' Meeting of the 
Text Encoding Initiative which will be held at the University of 
Wuerzburg, Germany, 10-16 October. The theme of this years' conference 
is "Philology in the Digital Age". The academic program features keynote 
lectures, parallel sessions of papers, posters and micropapers and is 
accompanied by workshops, tutorials, meetings of the Special Interest 
Groups and excursions.

Keynote lectures will be given by Edward Vanhoutte (Gent): "So You Think 
You Can Edit? The Masterchef Edition" and Andrea Rapp (Darmstadt): "From 
text technology to cultural technology: the role of the TEI in Virtual 
Research Environments".

The full program is available on the conference website where you can 
also register online and find information about travel and lodging.

Conference website: http://www.zde.uni-wuerzburg.de/tei_mm_2011/



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 12:21:08 +0100
        From: "Brookes, Stewart" <stewart.brookes at KCL.AC.UK>
        Subject: 'Digital Resources for Palaeography' Symposium: 5th September 2011...
        In-Reply-To: <4E2FBAD9.30905 at gmail.com>


'Digital Resources for Palaeography' Symposium
--------

Monday 5th September 2011, 9.30am-5.30pm

King's College London, Council Room, Strand WC2R 2LS

The 'Digital Resource for Palaeography' (http://digipal.eu<http://digipal.eu/>) at the
Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London, is delighted
to announce that registration is now open for our one-day symposium
on digital resources for palaeography.

Attendance is free and open to all, but places are limited and so
registration is essential.

-----------
Registering
-----------

To register, email your details as you would like them to appear
on your name badge to digipal [at] kcl.ac.uk http://kcl.ac.uk/  by Monday 22nd August 2011.
Refreshments and a sandwich-style lunch will be provided, so do let
us know if you are vegetarian.

A flyer is available from http://digipal.eu/blogs/news/registration

--------
Speakers
--------

Elaine Treharne (Florida State University), 'A Site for Sore Eyes: Digital,
Visual  and Haptic Manuscript Studies'

Peter Stokes (King's College London), 'DigiPal in Theory'

Stewart Brookes (King's College London), 'DigiPal in Practice'

Wim Van-Mierlo (University of London), 'How to Work with Modern
Manuscripts in a Digital Environment — Some Desiderata'

Franck Le Bourgeois (Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon),
'Overview of Image Analysis Technologies'

Erik Kwakkel (Leiden University), 'The Digital Eye of the Paleographer:
Using Databases to Identify Scribes and Date their Handwriting'

John McEwan and Elizabeth New (Aberystwyth University), 'The Seals in
Medieval Wales Project: Towards a New Standard in Digital Sigillography'

Els De Paermentier (Ghent University), 'Diplomata Belgica: Towards a More
Creative and Comparative Palaeographical Research on Medieval Charters'

James Brusuelas (University of Oxford) and John Wallin (Middle Tennessee
State University), 'The Papyrologist in the Shell'

Ben Outhwaite and Huw Jones (Cambridge University Library), 'Navigating
Cambridge's Digital Library: the Cairo Genizah and Beyond'

Closing discussion with Michelle Brown (University of London), Donald Scragg
(University of Manchester) and Marc Smith (École Nationale des Chartes)

Hope to see you there,

Stewart
--
Dr Stewart J Brookes
Research Associate
Digital Resource for Palaeography
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London

Blog: http://digipal.eu/





More information about the Humanist mailing list