[Humanist] 23.305 new publications: communicating knowledge; vision

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Sep 18 07:52:33 CEST 2009


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 305.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "GLIMPSE | the art + science of seeing"                   (54)
                <editor at glimpsejournal.com>
        Subject: GLIMPSE vols 2.1 and 2.2, "China Vision, Parts I and II" now
                available

  [2]   From:    "Gentleman, Sarah" <Sarah.Gentleman at RIN.AC.UK>            (19)
        Subject: Communicating knowledge: how and why UK researchers publish
                and disseminate their findings


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 16 Sep 2009 15:58:33 -0700
        From: "GLIMPSE | the art + science of seeing" <editor at glimpsejournal.com>
        Subject: GLIMPSE vols 2.1 and 2.2, "China Vision, Parts I and II" now available


GLIMPSE vols 2.1 and 2.2, "China Vision, Parts I and II"
are now available at http://www.glimpsejournal.com
 
GLIMPSE is a quarterly, interdisciplinary journal that examines the
functions, processes, and effects of vision and its implications for
being, knowing, and constructing our world(s). Each theme-focused issue
features articles, visual essays,interviews, and reviews spanning the
physical sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities.
 
"China Vision, Part II" vol 2.2, summer 2009 
 
-The Dandelion School Transformation Project: A Conversation with Lily
Yeh
-Politically and Geographically Colorful: Revolution, Regime and Color
in China, by Han-Teng Liao, D.Phil. candidate
-What Will Happen Next? Envisioning a Personal Future in China, Dr.
Charles Stafford
-Myth and Modernity, Mary Ting, artist 
-Retro(spect): On Chinese Divination by Dissecting Written Characters,
by J.J.M de Groot
-Situ Panchen, 1700-1774: Tibetan Encampment Revivalist Painter, Glimpse
interviews Dr. David Jackson 
-Seeing History: Rediscovering the Art of Tibet Through Modern Imaging
Technology, by Dr. Chandra Reedy
-(Re)View:"Mahjong" at the Peabody Essex Museum (art exhibit), by Lauren
Cross
-(Re)Views: "Not One Less" and "Green Snakes" (films), by Ivy Moylan

"China Vision, Part I" vol 2.1, spring 2009
 
-Between Text and Image: The Ambiguity of Chinese Written Characters, by
Dr. Yuehping Yen
-Are Chinese Characters Modern Enough? An Essay on Their Role Online, by
Han-Teng Liao, D.Phil. candidate 
-Retro(spect): Chinese Magic Mirrors in "Chinese Art, Volume I" (1914),
Dr. S.W. Bushell
-Harvesting Cosmic Spectra: China's Large Area Multi-Object
Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), by M. Hurst with C. Arcabascio and N.
Giroux
-East Meets West, by Yang Liu, graphic designer
-Show Me the Yuan, Dr. Alan Baumler 
-Design for Commerce: Chinese Label Art for Common Goods, by Andrew
Cahan, collector 
-Desire of the Other: Perceptions of Beauty in Modern China, by Dr.
William Jankowiak and Dr. Peter Gray
-(Re)View: "Chinese Ghost Story" and "Frozen" (films), by Andy Hughes
-Chinatown, Boston, MA, 1993, Anthony Owens, photographer
 
 ________________________________________
 
 Contribute your work
 Upcoming issues:
 o Visions (due 10.15.09)
 o Cartography (due 11.15.09)
 o http://www.glimpsejournal.com/contribute.html



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 15:05:39 +0100
        From: "Gentleman, Sarah" <Sarah.Gentleman at RIN.AC.UK>
        Subject: Communicating knowledge: how and why UK researchers publish and disseminate their findings


A new report Communicating knowledge: how and why UK researchers publish and disseminate their findings<http://www.rin.ac.uk/communicating-knowledge> published by the Research Information Network (RIN) and JISC shows how researchers are concerned by what they perceive as mixed messages about the channels they should use to communicate their research findings. The report highlights the need for more consistent and effective guidance from funders and higher educational institutions. If they wish to encourage researchers to disseminate their work through a variety of channels as well as in high-status journals, they must give stronger and more positive messages about how those channels will be valued when it comes to assessing researchers’ performance they must give stronger and more positive messages about how those channels will be valued when it comes to assessing researchers’ performance.

The rise in investment in research over the last ten years has been accompanied by an increasing emphasis on measuring, assessing and evaluating research, its outputs and impact. Commissioned by the RIN in conjunction with JISC, this report investigates how researchers’ perceptions of how they are being assessed affects their decisions on when, where and how to publish and disseminate their findings.  It demonstrates the significant variations between researchers in different disciplines not only in the dissemination channels they use, but also in their patterns of collaboration (and how they acknowledge the contributions that members of a team have made), and in how they decide cite the work of others.

All these patterns of behaviour are changing, in part as a result of technological developments. And there are signs that the citation practices, for example, of younger researchers are different from those of their more senior colleagues. But the readiness with which outputs in the form of scholarly journal articles can be assessed and measured has underpinned their increasing dominance over all other forms of publication and dissemination. Researchers’ perceptions and understanding of the messages they receive from funders and from universities may often be mistaken, but they influence what researchers publish and how, and they give rise to real concerns. Many researchers see a damaging tension between their desire to communicate via channels which enable them to reach and influence their intended audiences – often beyond academia – as rapidly as possible, and the pressures to publish in high-status journals. Changes in assessment procedures, whether via the Research Excellence Framework (REF) or from other sources, will change researchers’ behaviour further. Many are already considering citing their colleagues’ work more often.

The report provides important evidence for funders and policy makers, as well as for the research community, in the continuing consultations about the future mechanisms for assessing research performance. It also shows that it is necessary for this to be an ongoing process to keep monitoring the changes in technology and research practices. It is important that changes in those mechanisms are based on a detailed understanding of both the behaviours and the motivations of researchers across the full range of disciplines and subjects.

The report and a briefing are available at www.rin.ac.uk/communicating-knowledge<http://www.rin.ac.uk/communicating-knowledge>

A short podcast interviewing Michael Jubb, Director of the RIN and Neil Jacobs, Programme Manager Information Environment at JISC is also available at www.jisc.ac.uk/news/stories/2009/09/podcast88communicatingknowledge.aspx<http://www.jisc.ac.uk/news/stories/2009/09/podcast88communicatingknowledge.aspx>

------------
Sarah Gentleman
Communications Officer
Research Information Network
96 Euston Road
London NW1 2DB

telephone: 020 7412 7241

Follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/research_inform
RIN Facebook group http://en-gb.facebook.com/pages/City-of-London-United-Kingdom/Research-Information-Network/29441497954

email: sarah.gentleman at rin.ac.uk<mailto:sarah.gentleman at rin.ac.uk>
website: www.rin.ac.uk<http://www.rin.ac.uk/>


Listen to our podcasts at www.rin.ac.uk/podcasts<http://www.rin.ac.uk/podcasts>





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