[Humanist] 31.751 events: oral history of British computing; data science; digital assets

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Apr 7 11:06:30 CEST 2018


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 751.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Meaghan Brown <mbrown at folger.edu>                         (21)
        Subject: Digital Rough Magic: Advancing the Miranda Digital Asset
                Platform

  [2]   From:    DATA Secretariat <cfps at scitevents.net>                    (18)
        Subject: Call For Papers - DATA 2018 (Porto / Portugal)

  [3]   From:    Gabrielė <gabrielemucho at gmail.com>                        (8)
        Subject: ORAL HISTORY OF BRITISH COMPUTING -- Tuesday 10 April 2018,
                6.30pm - 8.30pm


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 4 Apr 2018 18:09:21 +0000
        From: Meaghan Brown <mbrown at folger.edu>
        Subject: Digital Rough Magic: Advancing the Miranda Digital Asset Platform


Hello folks,

The Folger is inviting applications to Digital Rough Magic: Advancing the Miranda Digital Asset Platform, Sept. 21-22, 2018.

This two-day workshop aims to bring together a variety of participants from early modern studies, digital humanities, and libraries and archives for a behind-the-scenes look at the Folger's new digital asset platform, Miranda. Participants will get a first-hand tour of Miranda and a chance to explore its future development and potential outcomes. Conversations will be framed in the context of current tools and the trajectory of digital scholarship with a keen eye towards efficacy and practical use. Participants will contribute to small, collaborative working groups and provide guidance to the Folger for current and future development.
Applicants are invited to consider the role of platforms such as Miranda in early modern studies and digital humanities from a variety of perspectives, including but not limited to its ability to facilitate:

  *   Transcription and annotation (both of texts and images)
  *   Textual analysis
  *   Display and manipulation of Audiovisual materials
  *   Project management and support.

Applicants should mention specific area(s) of interest in their essays.
This workshop is jointly held by the Folger Digital Media & Publications and Folger Institute divisions, and is generously supported through an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant for the construction of the Miranda digital asset platform. Questions regarding the workshop or application process can be directed to DigitalConf at folger.edu<mailto:DigitalConf at folger.edu>.

More information can be found at: https://folgerpedia.folger.edu/Digital_Rough_Magic:_Advancing_the_Miranda_Digital_Asset_Platform_(workshop).

Applications are due April 20th. Please let me know if I can answer any questions.

Cheers,
Meaghan

--
Dr. Meaghan J. Brown
Digital Production Editor
202 548 8778

Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol St., SE
Washington, DC 2003


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2018 18:10:13 +0000
        From: DATA Secretariat <cfps at scitevents.net>
        Subject: Call For Papers - DATA 2018 (Porto / Portugal)


CALL FOR POSITION PAPERS

7th International Conference on Data Science, Technology and Applications

Submission Deadline:  April 27, 2018

http://www.dataconference.org/

July 26 - 28, 2018
Porto - Portugal

What is a position paper?

A position paper presents an arguable opinion about an issue. The goal of a position paper is to convince the audience that your opinion is valid and worth listening to, without the need to present completed research work and/or validated results.

"Value of Data in a Data-Driven Economy" is the theme of the 7th International Conference on Data Science, Technology and Applications (DATA) which purpose is to bring together researchers, engineers and practitioners interested on databases, big data, data mining, data management, data security and other aspects of information systems and technology involving advanced applications of data.

[...]

Proceedings will be submitted for indexation by:
DBLP, Thomson-Reuters Conference Proceedings Citation Index, INSPEC, EI and SCOPUS.

All papers presented at the conference venue will also be available at the SCITEPRESS Digital Library.

Kind regards,
Marina Carvalho
DATA Secretariat

Address: Av. D. Manuel I, 27A 2Esq, 2910-595 Setubal, Portugal

Tel: +351 265 100 033

Web:   http://www.dataconference.org/

--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 6 Apr 2018 12:22:10 +0100
        From: Gabrielė <gabrielemucho at gmail.com>
        Subject: ORAL HISTORY OF BRITISH COMPUTING -- Tuesday 10 April 2018, 6.30pm - 8.30pm


COLLECTING AN ORAL HISTORY OF BRITISH COMPUTING
Faraday Lecture Theatre, Singleton Campus, 6:30-8:30pm (admission free)

http://www.bcs.org/content/conWebDoc/59010

This talk will be given in English

Speaker: Dr Thomas Lean, British Library

“We thought there would be scope for another one, or perhaps two, big computers in the UK, and three or four in Europe:" Collecting an Oral History of British Computing.

Since 2009 An Oral History of British Science, run by National Life Stories at the British Library, has recorded over 150 figures from the history of science and engineering in Britain. Amongst them were figures from the history of computing, people whose work stretched from the electronic brains of the 1940s to today's information driven world, along with many others who had used computers in other branches of science and technology. In this talk Dr Tom Lean, project interviewer on “An Oral History of British Science”, explores what interviews with computer developers can reveal about the history of computing in Britain, using this collection of insights to tell the personal stories behind computing developments and explore how the use of computers has impacted on work in other areas.

Tom Lean is project interviewer on “An Oral History of British Science” and “An Oral History of the Electricity Supply Industry”, at National Life Stories at the British Library. Since starting on the project he has recorded life story interviews with over a hundred British scientists and engineers from a wide range of different disciplines and backgrounds. His research interests include the oral history of science and technology, history of computing (the subject of his PhD thesis and 2016 book 'Electronic Dreams: How 1980s Britain learned to love the computer') and the history of the electricity supply industry.





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