[Humanist] 31.316 URL for archaeology blog

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Sep 22 19:07:11 CEST 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 316.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2017 13:34:49 +0000
        From: "Burke, Robin" <rburke at cs.depaul.edu>
        Subject: Re: Humanist Digest, Vol 108, Issue 14
        In-Reply-To: <mailman.9.1506074403.12079.humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org>

The URL for reading (rather than editing) the Brughmans blog post referred to below is:

https://archaeologicalnetworks.wordpress.com/2017/09/21/the-romans-and-calculators-discuss-debate-published-in-antiquity/


———————————————————————————————
Robin Burke, Professor
School of Computing, DePaul University
rburke at cs.depaul.edu

 
--[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Date: Thu, 21 Sep 2017 17:37:34 +0000
            From: Tom Brughmans <000000f86040a99e-dmarc-request at JISCMAIL.AC.UK>
            Subject: Formal approaches in Roman Studies
            In-Reply-To: <20170917214505.65A277C61 at digitalhumanities.org>
    
    
    [from Digital Classics list]
    
    Dear all,
    
    Apologies for this blatant self-advertising, but I thought the following would be of particular interest to the Digital Classicist community.
    
    Today, a pair of discussion papers was published in Antiquity on the topic of the role of formal computational approaches in Roman studies. It was sparked by our paper on computational modelling, which was discussed by Van Oyen, and we finally wrote a reply to this discussion. The discussion concerns in particular the use of computational simulation models, the use of large digitised datasets, and the theoretical challenges this poses. We very much hope that this will lead to more discussions about the role of formal approaches in Roman studies, and more critical formal studies.
    
    The original paper sparking the discussion:?https://www.academia.edu/24250074/Brughmans_T._and_Poblome_J._2016_._Roman_bazaar_or_market_economy_Explaining_tableware_distributions_through_computational_modelling._Antiquity_350_393_408._DOI_10.15184_aqy.2016.35
    
    The discussion piece by Astrid Van Oyen: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/agents-and-commodities-a-response-to-brughmans-and-poblome-2016-on-modelling-the-roman-economy/3BE57BBBFB2EBF3CBCACDCD7B13932B2
    
    Our reply to this discussion: https://www.academia.edu/34635477/The_case_for_computational_modelling_of_the_Roman_economy_a_reply_to_Van_Oyen
    
    A summary of the debate on my blog: https://wordpress.com/post/archaeologicalnetworks.wordpress.com/2425
    
    Kind regards,
    Tom Brughmans?School of Archaeology
    University of OxfordSecretary of CAA International
    Project MERCURY:http://oxrep.classics.ox.ac.uk/affiliated%20projects/mercury/
    Blog:
    https://archaeologicalnetworks.wordpress.com/
    






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