[Humanist] 31.365 events: modelling; undergraduate research; a beautiful friendship?

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Oct 18 08:56:31 CEST 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 365.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Antonio Rojas Castro <rojas.castro.antonio at gmail.com>     (15)
        Subject: Register for ‘Questioning Models’ (Köln, November 8-10)

  [2]   From:    "Salciute Civiliene, Gabriele"                            (17)
                <gabriele.salciute_civiliene at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: seminar by Jan Rybicki 10th November 2017

  [3]   From:    Angie Beiriger <beiriger at reed.edu>                        (11)
        Subject: CFP: Transforming student research in the digital age
                Conference, Reed College


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2017 23:20:21 -0700
        From: Antonio Rojas Castro <rojas.castro.antonio at gmail.com>
        Subject: Register for ‘Questioning Models’ (Köln, November 8-10)


Dear all,

The Cologne Centre for eHumanities (CCeH)  http://cceh.uni-koeln.de  is
organizing a two-day symposium and a one-day workshop at the University
of Cologne. The event aims at exploring intersectional approaches to
textual scholarship and Digital Humanities theories, practices, and tools.

The full programme, and registration are now open:
http://questioningmodels.uni-koeln.de/

We are looking forwards to seeing you in Köln!

Antonio Rojas Castro
On behalf to the Organizing Committee

-- 
​Dr. Antonio Rojas Castro
Researcher, Cologne Center for eHumanities
Communication coordinator, EADH
 http://www.antoniorojascastro.com



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2017 13:54:30 +0000
        From: "Salciute Civiliene, Gabriele" <gabriele.salciute_civiliene at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: seminar by Jan Rybicki 10th November 2017


"Harper Lee, Elena Ferrante and Some Other Less Sensational 
but Equally Interesting Cases in Authorship Attribution / 
Stylometry / Macroanalysis / Distant Reading"

Jan Rybicki (Kraków)

Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
Strand Campus K6.63
10 November 2017
15.00-16.00

Speaker:

Jan Rybicki is Assistant Professor at the Institute of English Studies, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. His research expanded from traditional literary and translation studies into stylometry and distant reading. A founding member of Computational Stylistics Group, the makers of the stylo R package that has since become a major tool in quantitative textual analysis, he has published in this field in Literary and Linguistic Computing/Digital Scholarship in the Humanities, The R Journal and in Information Sciences. Rybicki is also an active literary translator with more than 30 novels translated from English into Polish; he is now working on his 8th book by John le Carré, A Legacy of Spies.

Abstract:

Reading literature with computers seems to oscillate back and forth between the micro and the macro scales. As more and more texts become available, per fas or per nefas, in the electronic medium, machines allow us to count anything that is countable in texts, literary or otherwise. But then these minute details of literary creation are combined into big datasets to provide new outlooks on individual authors and on entire literary traditions; on literature in the original or in translation or both. 

Stylometrists seem to be trying to do two things at once: one relatively small thing and one pretty big. The small thing – authorship attribution of individual writings – has always been their main if not their only raison d’être in mainstream literary studies. But the big thing is that they take giant leaps into classification of as many literary texts as their digital collections and their computers can handle. Can the twain: close and distant reading come together in “a beautiful friendship”?
-----

*** Attachments:
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1508251021_2017-10-17_gabriele.salciute_civiliene@kcl.ac.uk_18787.2.pdf


--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2017 20:59:58 +0000
        From: Angie Beiriger <beiriger at reed.edu>
        Subject: CFP: Transforming student research in the digital age Conference, Reed College


Dear colleagues,

Proposals are now being accepted for the conference "Collaborating to transform undergraduate research: evolving modes of scholarly practice in the digital age" to be held March 14-16, 2018 at Reed College in Portland, OR. This is the capstone event of a five-year project that focused on collaboration among faculty, librarians, and instructional technologists to better support students as they become researchers, and particularly as they engage with digital sources, tools, and methods. We are especially welcome proposals from collaborative teams.

For details on submissions or to read more about the conference, visit http://www.reed.edu/e2s/conference/index.html. The submission deadline is October 30; general registration will open in early December.

Hope to see you in March!

Angie Beiriger

--
Angie Beiriger
Humanities and Digital Scholarship Librarian
Reed College
Portland, OR
beiriger at reed.edu<mailto:beiriger at reed.edu>





More information about the Humanist mailing list