[Humanist] 31.357 events: born-digital records; the Saussurean parole; network histories

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Oct 12 10:08:12 CEST 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 357.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Enrico Natale <enrico.natale at infoclio.ch>                 (23)
        Subject: Conference: Computer Networks Histories, Lugano, 14-15 Dec.
                2017

  [2]   From:    Lise Jaillant <l.jaillant at gmail.com>                      (11)
        Subject: Reminder: CFP Workshop 2 “After the Digital Revolution:
                Bringing together archivists and scholars to preserve born-
                digital records and produce new knowledge”

  [3]   From:    Francesco Borghesi <francesco.borghesi at sydney.edu.au>     (14)
        Subject: Sydney Digital Humanities: John Burrows -The Three Pillars
                of a Saussurean Parole - 20th of October


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 11 Oct 2017 11:54:08 +0200
        From: Enrico Natale <enrico.natale at infoclio.ch>
        Subject: Conference: Computer Networks Histories, Lugano, 14-15 Dec. 2017


Dear colleagues, 

The association History and Computing, The Institute of Media and Journalism & the China Media Observatory at the USI Università della Svizzera italiana, and infoclio.ch are thrilled to invite you to the International Conference 

«Computer Networks Histories: Local, National and Transnational Perspectives » (Lugano, Switzerland, 14th -15th December 2017). 

28 speakers coming from 13 countries will present and discuss the multiple trajectories of computer networks histories worldwide. 

Keynote speakers: prof. Ben Peters (University of Tulsa); prof. Hu Yong (Peking University). The conference program is available online and in attachment (the participation is free of charge!): http://www.cnh.usi.ch/programme

Best regards, 

Enrico Natale
Infoclio.ch
Hirschengraben 11
Postfach 6811
3001 Bern
Tel: +41 31 311 75 72
Fax:+41 31 311 75 74
info at infoclio.ch

Colloque infoclio.ch 2017: Histoire du son & documents sonores
Berne, 24 novembre 2017
Programme <https://www.infoclio.ch/fr/infoclioch-colloque-2017-%E2%80%93-histoire-du-son-et-documents-sonores> / Inscription <https://www.infoclio.ch/fr/inscription> 

infoclio.ch Tagung 2017: Sound History & Tondocumente
Bern, 24. November 2017
Programm <https://www.infoclio.ch/de/infoclioch-tagung-2017-sound-history-tondokumente> / Anmeldung <https://www.infoclio.ch/de/anmeldung>

*** Attachments:
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1507715821_2017-10-11_humanist-owner@lists.digitalhumanities.org_3000.1.1.html
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1507715821_2017-10-11_humanist-owner@lists.digitalhumanities.org_3000.1.2.pdf


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 11 Oct 2017 10:01:59 +0000
        From: Lise Jaillant <l.jaillant at gmail.com>
        Subject: Reminder: CFP Workshop 2 “After the Digital Revolution: Bringing together archivists and scholars to preserve born-digital records and produce new knowledge”


Reminder: the deadline for sending an abstract for Workshop 2, "After the Digital Revolution," is 30 October 2017. For more information, see: http://www.afterthedigitalrevolution.com/ 

The workshop will be in London (25-26 Jan. 2018).

Workshop Highlights:
• Internationally-recognised experts including the Chairs of the Email Archives Task Force funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Digital Preservation Coalition: Kate Murray (Library of Congress) and Christopher Prom (U of Illinois)
• Keynote speaker: David McKnight (Director of Special Collections, University of Pennsylvania)
• Networking opportunities – be part of the conversation and mingle with world-class scholars, archivists and decision makers

[...]

Best wishes,

Dr Lise Jaillant | Lecturer (Assistant Professor)
School of the Arts, English and Drama | Loughborough University, UK

Cheap Modernism: Expanding Markets, Publishers’ Series and the Avant-Garde (Edinburgh UP, April 2017)



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 00:50:16 +0000
        From: Francesco Borghesi <francesco.borghesi at sydney.edu.au>
        Subject: Sydney Digital Humanities: John Burrows -The Three Pillars of a Saussurean Parole - 20th of October


Sydney Digital Humanities Research Group Seminar

The Three Pillars of a Saussurean Parole
Presenter: John Burrows, University of Newcastle

<https://wordvine.sydney.edu.au/files/2376/18679>

Much of the quantitative work undertaken in stylistic analysis has to do with word frequencies-usually the relative frequencies of an appropriate set of word-types. The underlying postulate is that, by virtue of human individuality, our styles of writing form distinctive idiolects or Saussurean paroles, personal (though not necessarily conscious) selections from langue as a general system. These paroles display multifarious properties. Among them three major features, all quantifiable, enable us to model the style of written texts with considerable accuracy and to compare them with each other.

The three are measures of abundance, of consistency, and of interrelationship. Relative abundance, ranging from high frequencies down to zero, is easily calculated and can yields potent contrasts. But abundance is of little use for our purposes unless it is consistently sustained across a range of texts. Taken together, these two determinants carry a good deal of weight. Their limitation, however, is that they treat the language as a mere list of chosen word-types or, at best, as an aggregation of them. But, as everybody knows, language functions through the interrelationship of words. Those who have sought to go further by choosing word-types that tend to ‘go together’ have taken sequence and close proximity as their criteria. But many words display similar patterns of frequency without necessarily meeting those criteria: sets of grammatical associates, syntactic partnerships, and deixis among the function words or of features, like archaism, colloquialism, Latinism, and many others among the lexical words. Such sets, moreover, often have negative corollaries, the alternatives consistently not chosen. 

Across a range of texts appropriate to whatever case may be in hand, both positive resemblances and direct contrasts of frequency can be identified by Spearman’s method of correlation. The coefficients (or rho-scores) for many of the pairs united in this way show very high levels of statistical significance. These pairs can be gathered in sets embracing all the partners of a given member, with separate subsets for positives and negatives. When, for example, ‘the’ is taken as a ‘headword,’ it yields positive and negative sets, ‘THE_p’ and ‘THE_n.’ Such ‘rho-sets,’ as I call them, can then be treated as compound variables and employed as data in much the same ways as we customarily use single-word variables. The trials undertaken (and illustrated here) suggest that this approach gives unusually accurate measures of stylistic difference, especially with short texts. Many of the sets themselves are of considerable philological interest and help to explain how the study of word frequencies can be so rich in stylistic information.

-----
John Burrows (MA Sydney & Cambridge, PhD London) is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Newcastle, where he has been the director of the Centre for Literary and Linguistic Computing, and which he joined in 1976 after having spent the previous fifteen years at the University of Sydney. Since he took up literary computing in 1979, he has published a book and over fifty articles in that field. The last to appear was in January 2017, a collaborative article in the Authorship Companion volume of the New Oxford Shakespeare. The most recent of all was submitted for publication in August, 2017. He has also given invited lectures in leading universities in Australia, the UK, and North America. These include Cambridge, Oxford, London, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Yale, and Toronto. Since 1989, he is Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, and since 2010 Member of the Order of Australia. In 2001, he received the Busa Award for Computing in the Humanities.

For further information please see the Sydney Digital Humanities Research Group page http://sydney.edu.au/intellectual-history/sdh/index.shtml  or contact the Research Group Leader Francesco Borghesi francesco.borghesi at sydney.edu.au<mailto:francesco.borghesi at sydney.edu.au>

Date: Friday, 20th of October 2017
Time: 2 pm
Location: Quad Latin 1 S224, Quadrangle Building, The University of Sydney

Free and open to all




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