[Humanist] 31.419 pubs: Brazilian literature; abstract patterns; data cultures

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Nov 13 08:28:14 CET 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 419.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    William L. Benzon <bbenzon at mindspring.com>                (13)
        Subject: Abstract Patterns in Stories: From the intellectual legacy
                of David G. Hays | Bill Benzon - Academia.edu

  [2]   From:    "Rivero, Alicia" <arivero at unc.edu>                         (5)
        Subject: Call for Papers: science and Brazilian literature, etc.,
                vol. 24 (2018) _Ometeca_ journal; deadline for abstracts,
                Dec. 15, 2017

  [3]   From:    "Andrew Piper, Prof." <andrew.piper at mcgill.ca>             (9)
        Subject: CFP: Data Cultures Special Issue of Cultural Analytics


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2017 05:51:21 -0500
        From: William L. Benzon <bbenzon at mindspring.com>
        Subject: Abstract Patterns in Stories: From the intellectual legacy of David G. Hays | Bill Benzon - Academia.edu


I prepared this paper for the first Workshop on the History of Expressive Systems (HEX01), November 14, 2017:

Abstract Patterns in Stories
 https://www.academia.edu/34975666/Abstract_Patterns_in_Stories_From_the_intellectual_legacy_of_David_G._Hays 

Alternatively you can get it at SSRN: Abstract Patterns in Stories: From the Intellectual Legacy of David G. Hays <https://ssrn.com/abstract=3060605>

Abstract: Coleridge's " Kubla Khan " exhibits nested structures suggesting an underlying computational process. Seeking to understand that process I joined the computational linguistics research group of David G. Hays in 1974, which was investigating a scheme whereby abstract concepts were defined over patterns in stories. Hays examined concepts of alienation; Mary White examined the beliefs of a millenarian community; and Brain Phillips implemented a system that analyzed short stories for the theme of tragedy. I examined Shakespeare's sonnet 129, " The Expense of Spirit " , but was unable to apply the system to " Kubla Khan ". In 1976 Hays and I imagined a future system capable of 'reading' a Shakespeare play in some non-trivial manner. Such a system had not yet materialized, nor is it in the foreseeable future. Meanwhile, I have been identifying texts and films that exhibit ring-composition, which is similar to the nesting evident in " Kubla Khan ". Do any story generators produce such stories?

Bill Benzon
bbenzon at mindspring.com

646-599-3232

http://new-savanna.blogspot.com/  http://new-savanna.blogspot.com/
http://www.facebook.com/bill.benzon  http://www.facebook.com/bill.benzon
http://www.flickr.com/photos/stc4blues/  http://www.flickr.com/photos/stc4blues/
https://independent.academia.edu/BillBenzon <https://independent.academia.edu/BillBenzon>
http://www.bergenarches.com/#image1  http://www.bergenarches.com/#image1



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2017 13:32:30 +0000
        From: "Rivero, Alicia" <arivero at unc.edu>
        Subject: Call for Papers: science and Brazilian literature, etc., vol. 24 (2018) _Ometeca_ journal; deadline for abstracts, Dec. 15, 2017


CALL FOR PAPERS/CHAMADA DE TRABALHOS, 
OMETECA, VOL. 24 (2018): 
focus, Brazil/foco, Brasil

–abstract, December 15, 2017/resumo, 15 de dezembro de 2017

(http://ometeca.org).



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2017 17:21:39 +0000
        From: "Andrew Piper, Prof." <andrew.piper at mcgill.ca>
        Subject: CFP: Data Cultures Special Issue of Cultural Analytics

CFP: "Data Cultures, Culture as Data" - Special Issue of Cultural Analytics<http://culturalanalytics.org>
Guest editors - Amelia Acker & Tanya Clement, University of Texas at Austin

**Abstract Deadline Extended to Nov. 30, 2017**


Data have become pervasive in research in the humanities and the social sciences. New areas, objects, and situations for study have developed; and new methods for working with data are shepherded by new epistemologies and (potential) paradigms shifts. But data didn't just happen to us. We have happened to data. Karen Barad writes that "We are responsible for the world in which we live not because it is an arbitrary construction of our choosing, but because it is sedimented out of particular practices that we have a role in shaping" (102).

Yet where is our agency in that responsibility? What is the role we play in the data cultures/culture as data we form around sociomaterial practices? How can we better understand how these practices effect, and affect, the materialization of subjects, objects, and the relations between them? How can we engage our data culture in practical, critical, and generative ways?

In every field, boundaries have been drawn between data and human as if making meaning with data is innocent work, but these boundaries are never innocent. Questions are emerging about data cultures and culture as data—urgent questions that range across concerns with the datafication of culture including the codification (or code-ification) of social and cultural bias; the integrity of data and of human agency, subjectivity, and identity. This special issue of Cultural Analytics invites responses to these concerns.

To read the full invitation, please go here<http://culturalanalytics.org/2017/10/cfp-data-cultures-culture-as-data-special-issue/>.







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