[Humanist] 31.415 pubs: teaching; digital dissertations; data; slides; physics

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Nov 10 09:51:35 CET 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 415.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Andrew Russell <arussell at arussell.org>                     (9)
        Subject: 2017 Mahoney Prize: Erica Robles-Anderson and Patrik
                Svensson, "One Damn Slide After Another"

  [2]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (13)
        Subject: importance of physics

  [3]   From:    virginia kuhn <vkuhn at cinema.usc.edu>                      (63)
        Subject: CFP: The Digital Dissertation: History, Theory, Practice (an
                e-book and database project)

  [4]   From:    Matthew Steven Hayler <M.S.Hayler at bham.ac.uk>             (12)
        Subject: Collection on Teaching Digital Cultures

  [5]   From:    "Tanya E. Clement" <tclement at utexas.edu>                  (66)
        Subject: CFP: "Data Cultures, Culture as Data" - Special Issue of
                Cultural Analytics


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2017 10:44:18 -0500
        From: Andrew Russell <arussell at arussell.org>
        Subject: 2017 Mahoney Prize: Erica Robles-Anderson and Patrik Svensson, "One Damn Slide After Another"


Dear colleagues - 

Last weekend at the SHOT and SIGCIS meeting in Philadelphia, the winner of the 2017 Mahoney Prize was announced.  I’m delighted to share that news and the prize citation with this list.  Congratulations Erica Robles-Anderson and Patrik Svensson!

Winner:

Erica Robles-Anderson and Patrik Svensson. “’One Damn Slide After Another’: PowerPoint at Every Occasion for Speech.”  Computational Culture (January 15, 2016). <http://computationalculture.net/2016/01/11/one-damn-slide-after-another-powerpoint-at-every-occasion-for-speech/>

Prize Citation:

In “’One Damn Slide After Another’: PowerPoint at Every Occasion for Speech,” Erica Robles-Anderson and Patrik Svensson provide a highly original and insightful history of PowerPoint’s design, development, and use.  They convincingly argue how PowerPoint has become a dominant and indispensable medium for communication, yet like many other forms of ubiquitous software programs and packages it has undergone minimal critical analysis.  As such, the conditioning of knowledge production with PowerPoint is overlooked, and once distinct situations and settings such as classrooms, press conferences, and church sermons become more alike.  Overall, their article stands out for astutely engaging with communication theory, as well as making significant IT history and historiographical contributions by analyzing PowerPoint within the context of precursor technologies such as the DuPont Chart Room, white boards, and overhead projectors.

About the Mahoney Prize:
The Mahoney Prize recognizes an outstanding article in the history of computing and information technology, broadly conceived. The Mahoney Prize commemorates the late Princeton scholar Michael S. Mahoney, whose profound contributions to the history of computing came from his many articles and book chapters. The prize consists of a $500 award and a certificate. For the 2017 prize, articles published in the preceding three years (2014, 2015, and 2016) are eligible for nomination. The Mahoney Prize is awarded by the Special Interest Group in Computers, Information, and Society (SIGCIS) and is presented during the annual meeting of our parent group, the Society for the History of Technology.

For more information and list of previous winners, please visit: http://www.sigcis.org/node/405  http://www.sigcis.org/node/405


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2017 07:43:03 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: importance of physics


James W. Cortada, author e.g. of The Digital Hand: How Computers Changed 
the Work of American Manufacturing, Transportation, and Retail 
Industries (2004) and two subsdquent volumes (2006, 2008), has published 
a blog, "The importance of physics for humanists and historians" at the 
OUP site, Academic Insights for the Thinking World, 
https://blog.oup.com/2017/11/physics-for-humanists-historians/. 

Yours,
WM
-- 
Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor emeritus, Department of
Digital Humanities, King's College London; Adjunct Professor, Western
Sydney University and North Carolina State University; Editor,
Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (www.tandfonline.com/loi/yisr20)


--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2017 12:57:26 -0700
        From: virginia kuhn <vkuhn at cinema.usc.edu>
        Subject: CFP: The Digital Dissertation: History, Theory, Practice (an e-book and database project)


Have you completed or advised a digital dissertation or know someone who
has? Then please consider this project. We’re looking for submissions from
across the Humanities internationally. Please share widely!

Call for Participation:

The Digital Dissertation: History, Theory, Practice

A database and ebook project: http://bit.ly/2hxIiUe
 http://bit.ly/2hxIiUe 

Abstract submission: 12 January 2018

Virginia Kuhn, Kathie Gossett (eds.)

Humanities scholars recognize the growing importance of digital media in
knowledge production and distribution. However, recognition does not imply
acceptance. How does one negotiate digital scholarship in an academy that
remains largely print based in its outputs? The most valued scholarship is
still the book, monograph, or journal article, and this not only limits the
audience for humanities research to university scholars, but also limits
its forms of argumentation to a primarily Western, linearly structured way
of thinking. That is, relying on one mode of communication limits what can
be said and to whom it can be said, making the humanities insular rather
than allowing it to take advantage of opportunities to communicate with the
broader public. In their study, The Responsive PhD, The Woodrow Wilson
National Fellowship Foundation, argues that “scholarship is the heart of
the doctorate” and that programs need to ask “What encourages adventurous
scholarship? What retards and discourages it?” Adventurous scholarship
requires “new paradigms,” which demand an examination of the often
unarticulated philosophies that govern what qualifies as legitimate
scholarship.

How do these “new paradigms” play out in the context of the dissertation?
While digital dissertations have been around for twenty years or more, the
precise processes by which they are defined, created and defended remain
something of a mystery. Is an interactive pdf significantly different than
its paper-based counterpart? What specific possibilities can a digitally
networked environment offer that are impossible without its affordances?
How are dissertation committees able to gauge the quality of natively
digital work? What support systems and processes do students need to
complete these types of projects? How do precedents prove helpful in
defending one’s choice to create a digital dissertation? How do digital
projects change the ways faculty members advise dissertations?

This project, The Digital Dissertation: History, Theory, Practice, will
consist of a definitive database of digital dissertation projects as well
as an ebook whose chapters explore the larger implications of digital
scholarship across institutional, geographic and disciplinary divides. Have
you completed or advised a digital dissertation? Then please consider this
project.

There are two ways to participate:

1. Complete this brief survey about the work (which will form a database)
by January 12, 2018.

2. Complete this brief survey about the work (which will form a database
for others) and submit a 300--500 word proposal by January 12, 2018 for a
chapter in the e-book which responds to the most salient issue/s
surrounding the digital dissertation and the ways that students and
committee members managed the possibilities and obstacles inherent in this
type of work. We imagine these chapters as being 3000 to 5000 words in
length and due on May 11, 2018. Authors will be notified in early February.

Please send proposals and/or any  questions about the project to  Kathie
Gossett (kegossett at ucdavis.edu <kegossett at ucdavis.edu>) and Virginia Kuhn
(vkuhn at cinema.usc.edu <vkuhn at cinema.usc.edu>).

_______

Virginia Kuhn, PhD
Associate Professor of Cinema
Media Arts + Practice Division
School of Cinematic Arts
University of Southern California
http://virginiakuhn.net/
Twitter: @vkuhn

--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 5 Nov 2017 00:45:52 +0000
        From: Matthew Steven Hayler <M.S.Hayler at bham.ac.uk>
        Subject: Collection on Teaching Digital Cultures


Dear All,

I'm editing a collection on teaching digital cultures and we're currently seeking further articles - https://www.nature.com/palcomms/for-authors/call-for-papers#digital-cultures

If you teach/have taught any aspect of digital culture then we'd love for you to share your experience as the field develops - the collection will act as a state of the field, and also as a source of inspiration for tutors new to this area. If you have any queries please do get in contact, but full details are at the link above.

Best

_m
Dr. Matt Hayler
University of Birmingham
Director of the Centre for Digital Cultures
Challenging the Phenomena of Technology (out in paperback<http://www.palgrave.com/gb/book/9781137377852>)
Twitter - @cryurchin<https://twitter.com/cryurchin>
AHRC Ambient Literature http://ambientlit.com/  project
COST Evolution of REading in the Age of Digitisation (E-READ) European action http://ereadcost.eu/



--[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2017 10:10:00 -0600
        From: "Tanya E. Clement" <tclement at utexas.edu>
        Subject: CFP: "Data Cultures, Culture as Data" - Special Issue of Cultural Analytics
        In-Reply-To: <CADvdmv7zZPs2h1RT=hDjJgJMfDkdBvYrT44AeuNofQBKbAx+0Q at mail.gmail.com>


CFP: "Data Cultures, Culture as Data" - Special Issue of Cultural Analytics
Guest editors - Amelia Acker & Tanya Clement, University of Texas at Austin

"Mathematically, visually, and narratively, it matters which figures figure
figures, which systems systematize systems" Donna Haraway Environmental
Humanities 6 (2015), p. 160.

http://culturalanalytics.org/2017/10/cfp-data-cultures-
culture-as-data-special-issue/

Data have become pervasive in research in the humanities and the social
sciences. New areas, objects, and situations for study have developed; and
new methods for working with data are shepherded by new epistemologies and
(potential) paradigms shifts. But data didn't just happen to us. We have
happened to data. Karen Barad writes that "We are responsible for the world
in which we live not because it is an arbitrary construction of our
choosing, but because it is sedimented out of particular practices that we
have a role in shaping" (102).

Yet where is our agency in that responsibility? What is the role we play in
the data cultures/culture as data we form around sociomaterial practices?
How can we better understand how these practices effect, and affect, the
materialization of subjects, objects, and the relations between them? How
can we engage our data culture in practical, critical, and generative ways?

In every field, boundaries have been drawn between data and human as if
making meaning with data is innocent work, but these boundaries are never
innocent. Questions are emerging about data cultures and culture as
data—urgent questions that range across concerns with the datafication of
culture including the codification (or code-ification) of social and
cultural bias; the integrity of data and of human agency, subjectivity, and
identity. This special issue of Cultural Analytics invites responses to
these concerns.

We invite submissions related (but not limited) to:

*Proximity and distance between the creation of data and its collection
*The nature of data as object or content
*Modes of data circulation; dissemination and preservation
*Data audiences
*Histories and imaginary data futures
*Data expertises and folkways
*The environmental impact of data work
*Data and technological progressivism
*Data Accessibility and ethics
*Data ontologies
*The cultivation, taming, cleaning, and standardization of data
*The ethical and social implications of data mining
*The cultures, communities, and consciousness of data production
*Data literacies

Contribution Types
Research or theory articles (7,000 to 8,000 words)
Data reviews or Case studies of datasets (2,000 to 3,000 words, including
visualizations or demonstrations)
Opinion pieces (4,000 to 5,000 words)

Timetable for Submissions
Deadline for abstracts (250-500) -- early November 15, 2017
Deadline for paper submissions - June 15, 2018
Deadline review papers - August 15, 2018
Deadline revised papers - October 15, 2018
Publication of special issue December 1, 2018

Submission Details
Send abstracts and submissions to:
cultures.data at gmail.com

Contact
For more information please contact: Amelia Acker aacker [at]
ischool.utexas.edu or Tanya Clement tclement [at] utexas.edu

-- 
Tanya E. Clement
Associate Professor
Graduate Advisor
School of Information
University of Texas at Austin




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