[Humanist] 31.111 pubs: From Tool to Partner

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Jun 17 07:24:47 CEST 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 111.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2017 12:53:28 +0100
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: tool to partner

This is to alert you to a newly published book:

Jonathan Grudin, From Tool to Partner: The Evolution of Human-Computer 
Interaction. Synthesis Lectures on Human-Centered Informatics, January 
2017, Vol. 10, No. 1 , Pages i-183. Morgan & Claypool 
(http://www.morganclaypool.com/).

> Abstract.
>
> This is the first comprehensive history of human-computer interaction
> (HCI). Whether you are a user-experience professional or an academic
> researcher, whether you identify with computer science,human factors,
> information systems, information science, design, or communication,
> you can discover how your experiences fit into the expanding field of
> HCI. You can determine where to look for relevant information in
> other fields—and where you won't find it.
>
> This book describes the different fields that have participated in
> improving our digital tools. It is organized chronologically,
> describing major developments across fields in each period. Computer
> use has changed radically, but many underlying forces are constant.
> Technology has changed rapidly, human nature very little. An
> irresistible force meets an immovable object. The exponential rate of
> technological change gives us little time to react before technology
> moves on. Patterns and trajectories described in this book provide
> your best chance to anticipate what could come next.
>
> We have reached a turning point. Tools that we built for ourselves to
> use are increasingly influencing how we use them, in ways that are
> planned and sometimes unplanned. The book ends with issues worthy of
> consideration as we explore the new world that we and our digital
> partners are shaping.

Yours,
WM

-- 
Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
Humanities, King's College London; Adjunct Professor, Western Sydney
University and North Carolina State University; Editor,
Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (www.tandfonline.com/loi/yisr20)




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