[Humanist] 31.210 pubs: undergrad programs cfp; tools; computationalism & information cfp

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Jul 27 07:34:36 CEST 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 210.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    RLUK <info at rluk.ac.uk>                                    (16)
        Subject: RLUK publishes report on Digital Humanities Tools

  [2]   From:    "William J. Moner" <wjmoner at gmail.com>                    (29)
        Subject: Call for Chapters: Innovative Program Design for the 21st
                Century Undergraduate Education

  [3]   From:    Fintan Nagle <fsnlists at GMAIL.COM>                         (46)
        Subject: Third Call for Papers (submission date: 1 Sep): RoPP special
                issue on Computationalism and Philosophy of Information


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 26 Jul 2017 09:46:48 +0000
        From: RLUK <info at rluk.ac.uk>
        Subject: RLUK publishes report on Digital Humanities Tools


Digital Humanities Tools report
Research Libraries UK (http://www.rluk.ac.uk/)


RLUK has published a report on The role of Research Libraries in the creation, archiving, curation, and preservation of tools for the Digital Humanities, which we hope will be of interest to you.

Download the report from the RLUK website (http://rluk.us5.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=ae16178f19ce6399c5a3bcb7f&id=172677b377&e=6857f2e4ce)

The report revealed the important role that research libraries in the UK and Ireland play in facilitating academic research and teaching in Digital Humanities. More specifically, several of the participating libraries were found to be not only supporters of scholarship in the field, but active collaborators in projects where the creation, archiving, curation, and preservation of tools for Digital Humanities were involved.

It is worth mentioning that as the majority of previous studies looks at the role of libraries in supporting scholarship rather than in their role as collaborators in its production and is conducted with US libraries as their main focus, the UK academic library landscape was largely unexplored.

This report may be of interest as it is focused towards organisations which may:

* play a significant part in supporting/advocating for research libraries as well as influencing strategic planning and policy making nationally/internationally
* frequently support and collaborate with research libraries
* provide a space for discussion on issues around the role of libraries in Digital Humanities scholarship
* disseminate and discuss issues that concern the Digital Humanities community and its partners, such as research libraries
* raise awareness of the issues within the area of Digital Humanities and Librarianship and promote relevant work

Please do share this report with anyone who may be interested within your organisation or with your community members.

You may wish to contact the author, Christina Kamposiori (mailto:christina.kamposiori at rluk.ac.uk?subject=Digital%20Humanities%20Tools%20report) , if you have any questions concerning the report.

Download RLUK's Digital Humanities Tools report (http://rluk.us5.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=ae16178f19ce6399c5a3bcb7f&id=03ae4c5e34&e=6857f2e4ce)



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 26 Jul 2017 13:51:09 -0400
        From: "William J. Moner" <wjmoner at gmail.com>
        Subject: Call for Chapters: Innovative Program Design for the 21st Century Undergraduate Education


My colleagues and I are putting together an edited collection called
Redesigning the Liberal Arts: Innovative Program Design for the 21st
Century Undergraduate Education. We are seeking chapter contributions of
case studies in program design that cut across disciplines and emphasize
the role of liberal education in society. The full call is available at the
document link. Please consider sharing the CFP widely (or contributing!).

Excerpt from call:

"While many recent texts defend the value of a liberal education, this
proposed edited collection will take the next step and address how
institutions are rising to this challenge and developing liberal arts
programs that prepare students for the relentless pace of change and
innovation in the 21st century. Expanding on the AAC&U’s 2012 report, A
Crucible Moment: College Learning and Democracy’s Future, this collection
will explore best practices in revitalizing the liberal arts in higher
education by showcasing how forward-thinking colleges and universities of
all sizes and types are 'redesigning' with an eye to 21st century skills.
Our collection will highlight institutions of all types and sizes pursuing
creative (co)curricular innovations to design learning experiences that
support students’ personal and professional development in liberal arts
mindsets and skills."

I hope the call is of interest to you, and we look forward to reading about
your university's innovative practices in the liberal arts.

Regards,
William

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ZE_g-tTK60xXjjy5uPL4_
nuXdoEb7qAFC5qMTREZ-8k

-------------------------
William J. Moner, Ph.D.
wjmoner at gmail.com



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 26 Jul 2017 15:52:14 +0100
        From: Fintan Nagle <fsnlists at GMAIL.COM>
        Subject: Third Call for Papers (submission date: 1 Sep): RoPP special issue on Computationalism and Philosophy of Information


THIRD CALL FOR PAPERS

Subsequent to our first and CfPs, Review of Philosophy and Psychology invites
submissions for a special issue titled ‘Computationalism Meets the
Philosophy of Information’.

The view that the human mind is a kind of computational machine began to
make waves with the advent of the first computers in the middle of the last
century. McCulloch and Pitts suggested early on that the mind may be
something like a Turing machine. This view came to be known as ‘classical
computationalism’. It was quickly met with an onslaught of objections, and
in reaction a number of liberalisations ensued.

 One view that has recently been gaining ground attempts to articulate the
notion of computation in terms of information and information-processing.
Interest in these two areas, i.e. computationalism and the philosophy of
information, is on the ascendancy. This special issue is devoted to the
intersection between them, especially to papers that engage in a meaningful
way with recent work in cognitive science.

Accepted papers will complement invited contributions from:

   - Rosa Cao (NYU)
   - Nir Fresco (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)
   - Michael Rescorla (UCLA)
   - Mark Sprevak (Edinburgh)

Suitable papers may address such questions as:

   - What species of information are there, and which, if any, are
   processed by the mind?

   - Is there any evidence from neuroscience to support e.g. the claim that
   the brain operates with Shannon-information?

   - What is computation and how is it related to information processing?

   - Do certain theories of information privilege classical vs
   connectionist computationalism?

   - Can computation and/or information illuminate representational content?

   - Do measures of information flow capture learning?

   - How are human and deep learning analogous?

   - Can Bayesian models provide an adequate account of our cognitive
   capacities?

Answers to these and related questions promise to extend our understanding
of computation, information, the human mind, and its neural underpinning.

Submissions and refereeing

Submissions, no more than 8,000 words in length, are to be made through the
online editorial manager https://www.editorialmanager.com/ropp/default.aspx,
by September 1, 2017. Each submission will be peer-reviewed by no less
than two referees.

Guest Editors

Brian Ball (Philosophy, NCH and Oxford), Fintan Nagle (Psychology, NCH and
UCL), and Ioannis Votsis (Philosophy, NCH and LSE). Enquiries can be made
to the Guest Editors at firstname.lastname at nchlondon.ac.uk.

End of Call





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