[Humanist] 31.239 legal decisions and legal reasoning

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Aug 10 07:24:39 CEST 2017


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 31, No. 239.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Mark Davies <Mark_Davies at byu.edu>                         (18)
        Subject: Re:  31.231 legal decisions?

  [2]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (22)
        Subject: earlier thoughts on computing and legal reasoning


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2017 11:55:06 +0000
        From: Mark Davies <Mark_Davies at byu.edu>
        Subject: Re:  31.231 legal decisions?
        In-Reply-To: <20170808051027.358546D4B at digitalhumanities.org>


At BYU, we've been doing a lot with using corpora for studies of the law, especially with the BYU suite of corpora: http://corpus.byu.edu.

Both Stephen Mouritsen and Tom Lee, the authors of the Washington Post articles, are affiliated with the BYU Law School. And Gordon Smith, dean of the law school, has been quite active in the field as well.

For more information:

http://lawcorpus.byu.edu/
http://digitalcommons.law.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2561&context=lawreview
http://davies-linguistics.byu.edu/personal/#legal

Mark Davies

============================================
Mark Davies
Professor of Linguistics / Brigham Young University
http://davies-linguistics.byu.edu/

** Corpus design and use // Linguistic databases **
** Historical linguistics // Language variation **
** English, Spanish, and Portuguese **


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 10 Aug 2017 06:18:49 +0100
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: earlier thoughts on computing and legal reasoning
        In-Reply-To: <20170808051027.358546D4B at digitalhumanities.org>

On the law and computing, the following smattering should be of interest:

Lee Loevinger, Jurimetrics: The Next Step Forward. Minnesota Law Review 
33.5 (April 1949), pp. 455-493. Cited by Busa in Annals of Humanities 
Computing. CHum 14 (1980).

William B. Eldridge and Sally F. Dennis, The Computer as a Tool for 
Legal Research. Law and Contemporary Problems, Vol. 28, No. 1, 
Jurimetrics, (Winter, 1963), pp. 78- 99

John R. Brown, Electronic Brains and the Legal Mind: Computing the Data. 
Computer's Collision with Law. The Yale Law Journal, Vol. 71, No. 2 
(Dec., 1961), pp. 239-254

Zenon Bankowski et al, eds. Informatics and the Foundations of Legal 
Reasoning. Springer, 1995.

Then there's the stuff on analogy and legal reasoning. Since models are 
analogical, indeed both digital and analog machines by are design, this 
literature should be relevant.

Yours,
WM

-- 
Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor emeritus, Department of
Digital Humanities, King's College London; Adjunct Professor, Western
Sydney University and North Carolina State University; Editor,
Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (www.tandfonline.com/loi/yisr20)




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