[Humanist] 30.416 friendly introductions

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Oct 18 07:11:58 CEST 2016


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 416.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Ken Kahn <toontalk at gmail.com>                             (52)
        Subject: Re:  30.412 friendly introductions?

  [2]   From:    "Helena Barbas" <hbarbas at gmail.com>                       (62)
        Subject: RE:  30.412 friendly introductions?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 17 Oct 2016 07:45:48 +0100
        From: Ken Kahn <toontalk at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  30.412 friendly introductions?
        In-Reply-To: <a050dce5-c4f6-4716-b4a2-50aaa480e1dd at HUB01.ad.oak.ox.ac.uk>


How about Danny Hillis' The Pattern On The Stone: The Simple Ideas That
Make Computers Work or is 1998 too late?

On 17 October 2016 at 06:22, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>
>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 412.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>         Date: Mon, 17 Oct 2016 06:13:48 +0100
>         From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>         Subject: friendly introductions
>
> This question will only be answerable by those old enough to have been
> an academic when computers were relatively new to the humanities. I'm
> looking for recommendations of introductory texts -- specifically books,
> chiefly monographs -- that attempted to make "the computer" approachable
> and understandable to those who were or might have been somewhat
> tentative about computers. Examples are Feldman and Norman, The
> Wordworthy Computer  (1987); Shore, The Sachertorte Algorithm (1985);
> Evans, The Mighty Micro (1979); Laver, An Introduction to the Uses of
> Computers (1976); Schneider, Travels in Computerland (1974); Shorter,
> The historian and the computer (1962).
>
> The category of book I am interested in does not include books such as
> Abercrombie, Computer programs for literary analysis (1984), or Oakman,
> Computer methods (1980), or any of Susan Hockey's fine introductory
> texts. These address people who have put behind them, or into a robustly
> locked closet, any such tentativeness. They want to get started.
>
> I am also not looking for studies that report on or discuss specific
> research done with a computer, such as Hymes, The use of computers in
> anthropology (1962), or Bowles, Computers in humanistic research (1967).
> Nor does it include books focusing on or speaking from an interest in
> artificial intelligence, such as Sluckin, Minds and machines (1954), or
> Feigenbaum and Feldman, Computers and thought (1963).
>
> But if you have or know of books which take the temperature of former
> times with respect to computing please let me know what these are.
>
> Many thanks.
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
> Humanities, King's College London; Adjunct Professor, Western Sydney
> University




--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 17 Oct 2016 15:32:02 +0100
        From: "Helena Barbas" <hbarbas at gmail.com>
        Subject: RE:  30.412 friendly introductions?
        In-Reply-To: <20161017052205.447678176 at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear Willard - I'm old enough to answer your question :-) - I started as a
COBOL programmer before moving to the Literary-Humanistic side. I began
teaching Literature and new technologies/new media in 2002. My two books to
help the computer' scared were (and still are): Murray, Janet, Hamlet on the
Holodeck (1997) and Johnson, Steven, Interface Culture: How New Technology
Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate (1997). Good hunting, regards
Helena 

Helena Barbas (PhD)
D.E.P. – CICS.Nova
Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas
Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Gab. B 2 - 0.24
Av. de Berna, 26-C
Lisboa 1069-061 – Portugal
Tel.: +351-217908300
Mob.: +351-937020249
e-mail: hebarbas at fcsh.unl.pt  
homepage: http://www.helenabarbas.net


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