[Humanist] 30.45 visualisation of timelines

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sun May 22 08:41:56 CEST 2016


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 45.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Katherine Faull <faull at bucknell.edu>                     (104)
        Subject: Re:  30.44 pubs: visualisation of timelines; DSH 31.2

  [2]   From:    Robert B Allen <rba at boballen.info>                        (58)
        Subject: visualization of timelines

[Apologies for the error noted in [1] below. For a working link, which 
I just verified, try http://research.kraeutli.com]


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------


        Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 22:22:31 -0400
        From: Katherine Faull <faull at bucknell.edu>
        Subject: Re:  30.44 pubs: visualisation of timelines; DSH 31.2
        In-Reply-To: <20160521083632.BDF1466F4 at digitalhumanities.org>


Unfortunately, the link
http://researchonline.rca.ac.uk/1774/1/kräutli_florian_thesis_phd_2016.pdf.
is not working.  I would love to read the thesis!

On Sat, May 21, 2016 at 4:36 AM, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 44.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
[...]
> --[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 08:57:55 +0100
>         From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>         Subject: visualisation of timelines
>
>
> Many here will, I suspect, be interested in Florian Kräutli's doctoral
> thesis, "Visualising Cultural Data: Exploring Digital Collections
> Through Timeline Visualisations" (Royal College of Art, 2016), online at
> http://researchonline.rca.ac.uk/1774/1/kräutli_florian_thesis_phd_2016.pdf
> .
> A brief overview was presented yesterday in my Department's fine Early
> Careers Conference. From what I heard and saw this work is more than
> equal to e.g. the research of the Harvard metaLAB as presented last
> year at DH2015 by Jeffrey Schnapp in his keynote. Kräutli quoted from
> L. B. Archer's "The Nature of Research":
>
> > One has to ask, was the practitioner activity an enquiry whose goal
> > was knowledge? Was it systematically conducted? [...] Were the data
> > and the outcome validated in appropriate ways?
>
> The abstract follows.
>
> > This thesis explores the ability of data visualisation to enable
> > knowledge discovery in digital collections. Its emphasis lies on
> > time-based visualisations, such as timelines.
> >
> > Although timelines are among the earliest examples of graphical
> > renderings of data, they are often used merely as devices for linear
> > storytelling and not as tools for visual analysis. Investigating this
> > type of visualisation reveals the particular challenges of digital
> > timelines for scholarly research. In addition, the intersection
> > between the key issues of time-wise visualisation and digital
> > collections acts as a focal point. Departing from authored temporal
> > descriptions in collections data, the research examines how
> > curatorial decisions influence collections data and how these
> > decisions may be made manifest in timeline visualisations.
> >
> > The thesis contributes a new understanding of the knowledge embedded
> > in digital collections and provides practical and conceptual means
> > for making this knowledge accessible and usable.
> >
> > The case is made that digital collections are not simply
>  > representations of physical archives. Digital collections record not
> > only what is known about the content of an archive. Collections data
> > contains traces of institutional decisions and curatorial biases, as
> > well as data related to administrative procedures. Such '˜hidden data'
> > --“ information that has not been explicitly recorded, but is
> > nevertheless present in the dataset – is crucial for drawing informed
> > conclusions from digitised cultural collections and can be exposed
> > through appropriately designed visualisation tools.
> >
> > The research takes a practice-led and collaborative approach,working
> > closely with cultural institutions and their curators. Functional
> > prototypes address issues of visualising large cultural datasets and
> > the representation of uncertain and multiple temporal descriptions
> > that are typically found in digital collections.
> >
> > The prototypes act as means towards an improved understanding of and
> > a critical engagement with the time-wise visualisation of collections
> > data. Two example implementations put the design principles
> > that have emerged into practice and demonstrate how such tools may
> > assist in knowledge discovery in cultural collections.
> >
> > Calls for new visualisation tools that are suitable for the purposes
> > of humanities research are widespread in the scholarly community.
> > However, the present thesis shows that gaining new insights into
> > digital collections does not only require technological advancement,
> > but also an epistemological shift in working with digital
> > collections. This shift is expressed in the kind of questions that
> > curators have started seeking to answer through visualisation.
> > Digitisation requires and affords new ways of interrogating
> > collections that depart from putting the collected artefact and its
> > creator at the centre of humanistic enquiry. Instead, digital
> > collections need to be seen as artefacts themselves. Recognising this
> > leads curators to address self-reflective research questions that
> > seek to study the history of an institution and the influence that
> > individuals have had on the holdings of a collection; questions that
> > so far escaped their areas of research.
>
> Read it tonight!
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
> Humanities, King's College London


-- 
Katherine M. Faull, Ph.D.
Professor of German and Humanities
Director, Program in Comparative Humanities
Senior Fellow, Languages and Cultures Residential College 2014-15

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 19:29:20 +0900
        From: Robert B Allen <rba at boballen.info>
        Subject: visualization of timelines


Dear Willard,
 
About the discussion about visualization of timelines, I thought
HUMANIST readers might also be interested in this stream of research:
 
 Allen, R.B., Visualization, Causation, and History, *iConference*,
 2011, PDF[1], ACM[2], DOI[3]
 
Allen, R.B., and Nalluru, S., Exploring History with Narrative
Timelines. *HCII*, 2009, LNCS 5617, pp 333-338, 2009. PDF[4],
LNCS[5], DOI[6]
 
 Allen, R.B., A Focus-Context Timeline for Browsing Historical
 Newspapers. *ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries*, 2005, 260-
 261. PDF[7], DOI[8], ACM[9]
 
Allen, R.B., A Focus-Context Timeline for Browsing Historical
Newspapers. *ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries*, 2005, 260-
261. PDF[10], DOI[11], ACM[12],
 
Allen, R.B., Using Information Visualization to Support Access of
Archival Records. *Journal of Archival Organization*, 3(1), 2005, 37-49.
JAODL[13], DOI[14],Extract_About_Process_Preservation[15]
 
 Allen, R.B., Timelines as Information System Interfaces. *Proceedings
 International Symposium on Digital Libraries* (Tsukuba, Japan, Aug.
 1995), 175-180. HTML[16]  PDF[17],ProceedingsFrontMatter[18]
 
Sincerely,
Bob Allen
 
 
Dr. Robert (Bob) Allen
Department of Library and Information Science, Yonsei University
rballen at yonsei.ac.kr, rba at boballen.info
http://yslis.info/rba/
 
 
 

Links:

   1. http://boballen.info/RBA/PAPERS/ICONF2011/VCH.pdf
   2. http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1940835&CFID=9840151&CFTOKEN=80042112
   3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1940761.1940835
   4. http://boballen.info/RBA/PAPERS/HCII2009/narrativeTimelines.pdf
   5. http://www.springerlink.com/content/g242286162t844qu/
   6. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02556-3_38
   7. http://boballen.info/RBA/PAPERS/JCDL2005/focuscontext.pdf
   8. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1065385.1065445
   9. http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1065445&coll=ACM&dl=ACM&CFID=54981118&CFTOKEN=13438853
  10. http://boballen.info/RBA/PAPERS/JCDL2005/focuscontext.pdf
  11. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1065385.1065445
  12. http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1065445&coll=ACM&dl=ACM&CFID=54981118&CFTOKEN=13438853
  13. http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a902735393~frm=abslink
  14. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J201v03n01_04
  15. http://boballen.info/RBA/PAPERS/JAO/ProcessPreservation.pdf
  16. http://boballen.info/RBA/PAPERS/TL/tl.html
  17. http://boballen.info/RBA/PAPERS/TL/isdl.pdf
  18. http://boballen.info/RBA/PAPERS/TL/FrontMatter.pdf





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