[Humanist] 29.796 pubs: Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 31.1; Moneyball

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Mar 19 09:21:18 CET 2016


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 796.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Ken Friedman <ken.friedman.sheji at icloud.com>              (18)
        Subject: Moneyball for Book Publishers: A Detailed Look at How We
                Read

  [2]   From:    "oxfordjournals-mailer at alerts.highwire.org"               (93)
        Subject: Digital Scholarship Humanities Table of Contents for April
                1, 2016; Vol. 31, No. 1


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sat, 19 Mar 2016 08:51:40 +0100
        From: Ken Friedman <ken.friedman.sheji at icloud.com>
        Subject: Moneyball for Book Publishers: A Detailed Look at How We Read

Dear Willard,

This article in the New York Times has interesting implications for the digital humanities.

Moneyball for Book Publishers: A Detailed Look at How We Read

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/15/business/media/moneyball-for-book-publishers-for-a-detailed-look-at-how-we-read.html

Opening section:

—snip—

Andrew Rhomberg wants to be the Billy Beane of the book world.

Mr. Beane used analytics to transform baseball, famously recounted in “Moneyball,” a book by Michael Lewis. Now Mr. Rhomberg wants to use data about people’s reading habits to radically reshape how publishers acquire, edit and market books.

“We still know almost nothing about readers, especially in trade publishing,” said Mr. Rhomberg, the founder of Jellybooks, a reader analytics company based in London.

While e-books retailers like Amazon, Apple and Barnes & Noble can collect troves of data on their customers’ reading behavior, publishers and writers are still in the dark about what actually happens when readers pick up a book. Do most people devour it in a single sitting, or do half of readers give up after Chapter 2? Are women over 50 more likely to finish the book than young men? Which passages do they highlight, and which do they skip?

Mr. Rhomberg’s company is offering publishers the tantalizing prospect of peering over readers’ shoulders. Jellybooks tracks reading behavior the same way Netflix knows what shows you binge-watch and Spotify knows what songs you skip.

—snip—

Best regards,

Ken

Ken Friedman, PhD, DSc (hc), FDRS | Editor-in-Chief | 设计 She Ji. The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation | Published by Tongji University in Cooperation with Elsevier | URL: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/she-ji-the-journal-of-design-economics-and-innovation/

Chair Professor of Design Innovation Studies | College of Design and Innovation | Tongji University | Shanghai, China ||| University Distinguished Professor | Centre for Design Innovation | Swinburne University of Technology | Melbourne, Australia 

--
 



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sat, 19 Mar 2016 07:23:57 +0000
        From: "oxfordjournals-mailer at alerts.highwire.org"
        Subject: Digital Scholarship Humanities Table of Contents for April 1, 2016; Vol. 31, No. 1


Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 
Table of Contents Alert
Vol. 31, No. 1
April 2016
http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1?etoc

-----------------------------------------------------------------
 Original Articles
-----------------------------------------------------------------

  Stylometric model for detecting oath expressions: A case study for 
  Quranic texts
  Ahmad Alqurneh, Aida Mustapha, Masrah Azrifah Azmi Murad, and Nurfadhlina
  Mohd Sharef
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 1-20
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/1.abstract?etoc

  Finite-state transducer for Amazigh verbal morphology
  Fadoua Ataa Allah
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 21-29
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/21.abstract?etoc

  Identifying translationese at the word and sub-word level
  Ehud Alexander Avner, Noam Ordan, and Shuly Wintner
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 30-54
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/30.abstract?etoc

  Automatically identifying blend splinters that are morpheme candidates
  David Correia Saavedra
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 55-71
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/55.abstract?etoc

  A Brazilian contribution to teaching Geolinguistics from a tool for 
  generating and for visualizing linguistic maps
  Rodrigo Duarte Seabra, Valter Pereira Romano, Vanderci de Andrade 
  Aguilera, and Nathan Oliveira
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 72-83
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/72.abstract?etoc

  The Essay/ontology Workflow, Challenges in Combining Formal and 
  Interpretive Methods
  Miguel Escobar Varela
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 84-94
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/84.abstract?etoc

  Vafa spell-checker for detecting spelling, grammatical, and real-word 
  errors of Persian language
  Heshaam Faili, Nava Ehsan, Mortaza Montazery, and Mohammad Taher Pilehvar
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 95-117
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/95.abstract?etoc

  ANNIS3: A new architecture for generic corpus query and visualization
  Thomas Krause and Amir Zeldes
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 118-139
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/118.abstract?etoc

  A dependency treebank of Chinese Buddhist texts
  John Lee and Yin Hei Kong
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 140-151
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/140.abstract?etoc

  Knowledge-rich, computer-assisted composition of Chinese couplets
  John Lee, Ying Cheuk Hui, and Yin Hei Kong
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 152-163
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/152.abstract?etoc

  Towards the construction of a field: The developments and implications of
  mobile assisted language learning (MALL)
  Gi-Zen Liu, Hui-Ching Lu, and Chun-Ting Lai
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 164-180
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/164.abstract?etoc

  Semantic role induction in Persian: An unsupervised approach by using 
  probabilistic models
  Parisa Saeedi, Heshaam Faili, and Azadeh Shakery
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 181-203
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/181.abstract?etoc

  The sense of a connection: Automatic tracing of intertextuality by 
  meaning
  Walter Scheirer, Christopher Forstall, and Neil Coffee
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 204-217
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/204.abstract?etoc

-----------------------------------------------------------------
 Reviews
-----------------------------------------------------------------

  Information 2.0: New Models of Information Production, Distribution and 
  Consumption, 2nd Edition. Martin De Saulles.
  Harriett E. Green
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 218-219
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/218.extract?etoc

  Martin Paul Eve, Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies 
  and the Future.
  Lisa Spiro
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 219-221
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/219.extract?etoc

  Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities. Jim Ridolfo and William 
  Hart-Davidson (eds.).
  Ken S. McAllister
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 221-223
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/221.extract?etoc

  Cultural Heritage Information: Access and Management. Ian Ruthven and G. 
  G. Chowdhury (eds).
  Kathleen M. Smith
  Digital Scholarship Humanities 2016 31: 223-225
  http://dsh.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/223.extract?etoc







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