[Humanist] 30.195 tools

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Jul 22 08:30:56 CEST 2016


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 195.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 12:42:27 +0200
        From: Andrea Bolioli <abolioli at celi.it>
        Subject: Re:  30.192 tools
        In-Reply-To: <20160721055943.5E3EE7B7E at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear all

I agree with Willard McCarty.
Making a list of tools or using a tool is not a interesting research
activity, to my mind. Challenging goals are imagining new scenarios, creating
new applications, obtaining new results (" to make and remake tools").

If I have to learn how to use a tool like Gephi, for example, in order to
make social network analysis of literature, I can read Gephi's manual or go
to a teacher's lesson or have the support of a sw developer.
The point for me is why I'm making this analysis, the results I achieve,
how I achieve these results, what I could find out through this research in
the future.

Sometimes in DH I use Machine learning algorithms and ML libraries, but I
think that to include a list of ML libraries in a list of DH tools is not
particularly useful. When you have finished making the catalogue of tools,
the tools have already changed, because somebody worked on them.

Have a nice day !

2016-07-21 7:59 GMT+02:00 Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>:

>
>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 192.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>   [1]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>   (21)
>         Subject: tools and tooling
>
>   [2]   From:    Carmen Brando <carmen.brando at gmail.com>
>  (61)
>         Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
>
>   [3]   From:    John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>
>  (36)
>         Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
>
>   [4]   From:    Bill Pascoe <bill.pascoe at newcastle.edu.au>
>   (40)
>         Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
>
>   [5]   From:    Seth Denbo <sdenbo at gmail.com>
>  (60)
>         Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
>
>   [6]   From:    "Martin, Worthy N. (wnm)" <martin at virginia.edu>
>  (36)
>         Subject: RE:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
>
>
>
> --[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 07:17:59 +0100
>         From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>         Subject: tools and tooling
>
>
> In a panel session at the Jerusalem meeting of what was then called the
> International Conference of Computing in the Humanities (ICCH) in 1988, the
> organizer, Yaacov Choueka, suddenly and mischievously put me in charge of a
> panel whose topic was, "The tools are here. Where are the results?" Then I
> fumbled for an answer and, as I recall, came up with nothing worth
> remembering.
>
> I've pondered that question repeatedly ever since. Recently, asked to
> contribute to a three-volume Festschrift in Choueka's honour, Language,
> Culture, Computation (2014), I went at it again and entitled the result,
> "The tooling is here. Where are the results?" For it seems to me that
> tools,
> at least in the usual sense, i.e. applications, are not the point, rather
> the ability to make and remake tools. This, to my mind, is where (to borrow
> Bill Benzon's word and argument) "real" computing happens, in the
> humanities
> as elsewhere.
>
> Comments?
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
> Humanities, King's College London; Adjunct Professor, Western Sydney
> University
>
>
>
> --[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 09:16:55 +0200
>         From: Carmen Brando <carmen.brando at gmail.com>
>         Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
>         In-Reply-To: <20160720055321.059D9787B at digitalhumanities.org>
>
>
> Dear Adja,
>
> Thanks for the initiative.
> I believe the DIRT website (http://dirtdirectory.org/) would be a good
> place to start, maybe you knew about it already. However, this is not a
> code source repository, I guess you'd like to set up something similar for
> the DH.
>
> Also, thanks for the link to the machine learning tools site, I was exactly
> looking for that kind of repository.
>
> Kind regards,
> Carmen.
>
> --
> Carmen Brando
> Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), Paris
> Centre de recherches historiques (CRH UMR 8558)
> Github: https://github.com/cvbrandoe
>
> On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 7:53 AM, Humanist Discussion Group <
> willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:
>
> >                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 190.
> >             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
> >                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
> >                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> >
> >
> >
> >         Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 14:55:07 +0000
> >         From: "Pretnar, Ajda" <Ajda.Pretnar at fri.uni-lj.si>
> >         Subject: Curated list of digital humanities tools
> >
> >
> > Dear DH community,
> >
> > There was an idea at the recent DH2016 conference in Krakow to set up a
> > list of available digital humanities tools, frameworks, libraries,
> perhaps
> > even data sets. The idea was inspired by awesome-machine-learning <
> > https://github.com/josephmisiti/awesome-machine-learning>, which is a
> > curated list of machine learning tools. Awesome-digital-humanities <
> > https://github.com/ajdapretnar/awesome-digital-humanities> is a digital
> > humanities version of it. Currently it is in a set-up stage and you are
> > very welcome to contribute your own tools or the tools you use to the
> list.
> > I will review and merge pull requests as soon as possible.
> >
> > Thank you very much for contributions.
> >
> > Best wishes
> >
> > Ajda Pretnar,
> > Laboratory for Bioinformatics,
> > Faculty for Computer and Information Science, University of Ljubljana
>
>
>
> --[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 08:29:20 +0100
>         From: John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>
>         Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
>         In-Reply-To: <20160720055321.059D9787B at digitalhumanities.org>
>
> On 20/07/2016 06:53, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>
> >         Subject: Curated list of digital humanities tools
> >
>
> Aren't there already a number of such lists? Eg the unfortunately
> acronymed DIRT (not sure if this is being maintained):
> http://dirtdirectory.org/
> GeoDirt for DH GIS tools:
> http://geohumanities.org/geodirt
> DH Tools:
>
> http://dhresourcesforprojectbuilding.pbworks.com/w/page/69244319/Digital%20Humanities%20Tools
> and numerous pages on universiy libraries directed mainly towards their
> own students.
>
> Of course the major problem is the boundaries of the list, esp. if
> you're including frameworks & libraries, of which there are thousands,
> and wading through hundreds of thousands of listings to find the think
> you want, without spending too much time considering options one then
> finds unsuitable.
>
> Best
>
> John
>
>
> --
> John Levin
> http://www.anterotesis.com
> http://twitter.com/anterotesis
>
>
>
>
> --[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 12:42:43 +0000
>         From: Bill Pascoe <bill.pascoe at newcastle.edu.au>
>         Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
>         In-Reply-To: <20160720055321.059D9787B at digitalhumanities.org>
>
>
> Hi,
>
> Unfortunately I was unable to attend the DH2016 conference. There are so
> many DH tools, frameworks, APIs, websites, repositories, datasets etc now
> that it's hard to get a sense of what is out there. It's likely that we are
> all missing the existance of something we would have loved to know about.
> Almost every day I discover another DH site that astonishes me. A
> comprehensive, categorised list that people could submit to seems like the
> natural solution. I've started similar lists myself only to realise there
> are already many such lists.
>
> Some of the results of a google search
>
>
> https://www.google.com.au/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=digital%20humanities%20tools
>
> include lists of links to lists of DH tools.
>
> The problem then is not that there aren't any such lists, but that there
> are too many and none are comprehensive, and mainly that none have come to
> be generally accepted as the de facto standard resource. Because of this
> they aren't circulated as 'common knowledge.' This is a consequence of DH
> still being a young and booming area. Without wanting to reduce DH to
> economic terms, it is analogous to an new industry that has not yet
> consolidated into the usual oligopoly.
>
> This is an exciting time, where everyone has an opportunity in a
> sprawling, rapidly evolving ecosystem, not yet calcified into accepted
> practices and controlled by large players protected by scale as a barrier
> to entry. Ideas are *relatively* unconstrained by established
> preconceptions so there is a chance to define your own activity. I would
> like to think this anarchic environment is more conducive to innovation,
> exploration and discovery than a thoroughly systematised environment.
>
> As much as I would like to have a clear overview of all there is in this
> field, so that I could make use of others work, not replicate work, and to
> see where there are gaps to fill in or ways to build on something, or just
> so that I didn't miss something amazing, I think we need to recognise we
> live at a time when, with ever more people than ever before in the world,
> it's becoming impossible for anyone to have a comprehensive idea of the
> state of the art around the world. Something like a 'literature review'
> could only ever be incomplete and ephemeral. We can only float in an ocean
> of links without beginning or end, situated in a structure always in the
> process of assembly and decay, in part planned and subverted as we go. Only
> 6 years ago it was feasible to maintain a comprehensive list of DH but now,
> as with anything else on the internet, there is no end to it. Tag, link and
> search will work better than collection and taxonomy.
>
> I suppose the only generalised knowledge/overview we can expect is
> statistics and DH moments that spread as memes among the DH community.
> Perhaps then, some distant reading on DH
> projects/tools/frameworks/repos/datasets would be useful. Most likely
> there's more than one person working on that already that I haven't
> happened upon about yet.
>
> Kind regards,
>
> Dr Bill Pascoe
> eResearch Consultant
> C21CH Speculative Web Space http://hri.newcastle.edu.au
> Centre for 21st Century Humanities<
> http://www.newcastle.edu.au/research-and-innovation/centre/centre-for-21st-century-humanities/about-us
> >
>
> T: 0435 374 677
> E: bill.pascoe at newcastle.edu.au
>
> The University of Newcastle (UON)
> University Drive
> Callaghan NSW 2308
> Australia
>
>
>
>
> --[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 09:05:09 -0400
>         From: Seth Denbo <sdenbo at gmail.com>
>         Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
>         In-Reply-To: <20160720055321.059D9787B at digitalhumanities.org>
>
>
> While I think there's room for more than one site that provides ways to
> find tools and other digital resources that are of use to digital humanists
> and others, it's worth pointing out that a well-developed initiative of
> this kind has been in existence for over five years. DiRT Directory
>  http://dirtdirectory.org/  (initially based upon the excellent work that
> Lisa Spiro did on the Digital Research Tools Wiki) lists hundreds of tools
> and has a committed editorial and development community. It also has an
> API, integration with other DH projects such as TaPoR and Commons in a Box,
> and is currently being translated into Spanish.
>
> We encourage everyone to get involved and contribute new tools or update
> and add to existing listings.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Seth Denbo
> American Historical Association
>
>
>
>
> --[6]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 16:28:39 +0000
>         From: "Martin, Worthy N. (wnm)" <martin at virginia.edu>
>         Subject: RE:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
>         In-Reply-To: <20160720055321.059D9787B at digitalhumanities.org>
>
>
> Dear DH Community,
>   Hello. Of course, this is a perennial quest. Check out Quinn
> Dombrowski's excellent work at:
> http://dirt.projectbamboo.org
>
> Cheers,
>   Worthy
>
> _______________
> W.N. Martin
> Department of Computer Science
> and
> Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities
> University of Virginia
>
>
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-- 

Andrea Bolioli
Research & Innovation
CELI - Language Technologyhttps://www.celi.it
+39 333 7405664
@CELI_NLP





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