[Humanist] 30.192 tools

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Jul 21 07:59:43 CEST 2016


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 192.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (21)
        Subject: tools and tooling

  [2]   From:    Carmen Brando <carmen.brando at gmail.com>                   (61)
        Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?

  [3]   From:    John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>                         (36)
        Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?

  [4]   From:    Bill Pascoe <bill.pascoe at newcastle.edu.au>                (40)
        Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?

  [5]   From:    Seth Denbo <sdenbo at gmail.com>                             (60)
        Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?

  [6]   From:    "Martin, Worthy N. (wnm)" <martin at virginia.edu>           (36)
        Subject: RE:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 07:17:59 +0100
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: tools and tooling


In a panel session at the Jerusalem meeting of what was then called the
International Conference of Computing in the Humanities (ICCH) in 1988, the
organizer, Yaacov Choueka, suddenly and mischievously put me in charge of a
panel whose topic was, "The tools are here. Where are the results?" Then I
fumbled for an answer and, as I recall, came up with nothing worth
remembering. 

I've pondered that question repeatedly ever since. Recently, asked to
contribute to a three-volume Festschrift in Choueka's honour, Language,
Culture, Computation (2014), I went at it again and entitled the result,
"The tooling is here. Where are the results?" For it seems to me that tools,
at least in the usual sense, i.e. applications, are not the point, rather
the ability to make and remake tools. This, to my mind, is where (to borrow
Bill Benzon's word and argument) "real" computing happens, in the humanities
as elsewhere.

Comments?

Yours,
WM
--
Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
Humanities, King's College London; Adjunct Professor, Western Sydney
University


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 09:16:55 +0200
        From: Carmen Brando <carmen.brando at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
        In-Reply-To: <20160720055321.059D9787B at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear Adja,

Thanks for the initiative.
I believe the DIRT website (http://dirtdirectory.org/) would be a good
place to start, maybe you knew about it already. However, this is not a
code source repository, I guess you'd like to set up something similar for
the DH.

Also, thanks for the link to the machine learning tools site, I was exactly
looking for that kind of repository.

Kind regards,
Carmen.

--
Carmen Brando
Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), Paris
Centre de recherches historiques (CRH UMR 8558)
Github: https://github.com/cvbrandoe

On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 7:53 AM, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 30, No. 190.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>         Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 14:55:07 +0000
>         From: "Pretnar, Ajda" <Ajda.Pretnar at fri.uni-lj.si>
>         Subject: Curated list of digital humanities tools
>
>
> Dear DH community,
>
> There was an idea at the recent DH2016 conference in Krakow to set up a
> list of available digital humanities tools, frameworks, libraries, perhaps
> even data sets. The idea was inspired by awesome-machine-learning <
> https://github.com/josephmisiti/awesome-machine-learning>, which is a
> curated list of machine learning tools. Awesome-digital-humanities <
> https://github.com/ajdapretnar/awesome-digital-humanities> is a digital
> humanities version of it. Currently it is in a set-up stage and you are
> very welcome to contribute your own tools or the tools you use to the list.
> I will review and merge pull requests as soon as possible.
>
> Thank you very much for contributions.
>
> Best wishes
>
> Ajda Pretnar,
> Laboratory for Bioinformatics,
> Faculty for Computer and Information Science, University of Ljubljana


--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 08:29:20 +0100
        From: John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>
        Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
        In-Reply-To: <20160720055321.059D9787B at digitalhumanities.org>

On 20/07/2016 06:53, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>         Subject: Curated list of digital humanities tools
>

Aren't there already a number of such lists? Eg the unfortunately 
acronymed DIRT (not sure if this is being maintained):
http://dirtdirectory.org/
GeoDirt for DH GIS tools:
http://geohumanities.org/geodirt
DH Tools:
http://dhresourcesforprojectbuilding.pbworks.com/w/page/69244319/Digital%20Humanities%20Tools
and numerous pages on universiy libraries directed mainly towards their 
own students.

Of course the major problem is the boundaries of the list, esp. if 
you're including frameworks & libraries, of which there are thousands, 
and wading through hundreds of thousands of listings to find the think 
you want, without spending too much time considering options one then 
finds unsuitable.

Best

John


-- 
John Levin
http://www.anterotesis.com
http://twitter.com/anterotesis



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 12:42:43 +0000
        From: Bill Pascoe <bill.pascoe at newcastle.edu.au>
        Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
        In-Reply-To: <20160720055321.059D9787B at digitalhumanities.org>


Hi,

Unfortunately I was unable to attend the DH2016 conference. There are so many DH tools, frameworks, APIs, websites, repositories, datasets etc now that it's hard to get a sense of what is out there. It's likely that we are all missing the existance of something we would have loved to know about. Almost every day I discover another DH site that astonishes me. A comprehensive, categorised list that people could submit to seems like the natural solution. I've started similar lists myself only to realise there are already many such lists.

Some of the results of a google search

https://www.google.com.au/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=digital%20humanities%20tools

include lists of links to lists of DH tools.

The problem then is not that there aren't any such lists, but that there are too many and none are comprehensive, and mainly that none have come to be generally accepted as the de facto standard resource. Because of this they aren't circulated as 'common knowledge.' This is a consequence of DH still being a young and booming area. Without wanting to reduce DH to economic terms, it is analogous to an new industry that has not yet consolidated into the usual oligopoly.

This is an exciting time, where everyone has an opportunity in a sprawling, rapidly evolving ecosystem, not yet calcified into accepted practices and controlled by large players protected by scale as a barrier to entry. Ideas are *relatively* unconstrained by established preconceptions so there is a chance to define your own activity. I would like to think this anarchic environment is more conducive to innovation, exploration and discovery than a thoroughly systematised environment.

As much as I would like to have a clear overview of all there is in this field, so that I could make use of others work, not replicate work, and to see where there are gaps to fill in or ways to build on something, or just so that I didn't miss something amazing, I think we need to recognise we live at a time when, with ever more people than ever before in the world, it's becoming impossible for anyone to have a comprehensive idea of the state of the art around the world. Something like a 'literature review' could only ever be incomplete and ephemeral. We can only float in an ocean of links without beginning or end, situated in a structure always in the process of assembly and decay, in part planned and subverted as we go. Only 6 years ago it was feasible to maintain a comprehensive list of DH but now, as with anything else on the internet, there is no end to it. Tag, link and search will work better than collection and taxonomy.

I suppose the only generalised knowledge/overview we can expect is statistics and DH moments that spread as memes among the DH community. Perhaps then, some distant reading on DH projects/tools/frameworks/repos/datasets would be useful. Most likely there's more than one person working on that already that I haven't happened upon about yet.

Kind regards,

Dr Bill Pascoe
eResearch Consultant
C21CH Speculative Web Space http://hri.newcastle.edu.au
Centre for 21st Century Humanities<http://www.newcastle.edu.au/research-and-innovation/centre/centre-for-21st-century-humanities/about-us>

T: 0435 374 677
E: bill.pascoe at newcastle.edu.au

The University of Newcastle (UON)
University Drive
Callaghan NSW 2308
Australia



--[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 09:05:09 -0400
        From: Seth Denbo <sdenbo at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
        In-Reply-To: <20160720055321.059D9787B at digitalhumanities.org>


While I think there's room for more than one site that provides ways to
find tools and other digital resources that are of use to digital humanists
and others, it's worth pointing out that a well-developed initiative of
this kind has been in existence for over five years. DiRT Directory
 http://dirtdirectory.org/  (initially based upon the excellent work that
Lisa Spiro did on the Digital Research Tools Wiki) lists hundreds of tools
and has a committed editorial and development community. It also has an
API, integration with other DH projects such as TaPoR and Commons in a Box,
and is currently being translated into Spanish.

We encourage everyone to get involved and contribute new tools or update
and add to existing listings.

Best wishes,

Seth Denbo
American Historical Association



--[6]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 16:28:39 +0000
        From: "Martin, Worthy N. (wnm)" <martin at virginia.edu>
        Subject: RE:  30.190 list digital humanities tools?
        In-Reply-To: <20160720055321.059D9787B at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear DH Community,
  Hello. Of course, this is a perennial quest. Check out Quinn Dombrowski's excellent work at:
http://dirt.projectbamboo.org

Cheers,
  Worthy

_______________
W.N. Martin
Department of Computer Science
and
Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities
University of Virginia




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