[Humanist] 29.641 pubs: code; rhetoric; projects

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Jan 20 08:22:07 CET 2016


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 641.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Andrew Russell <arussell at stevens.edu>                      (5)
        Subject: new issue of Computational Culture on rhetoric and
                computation

  [2]   From:    Laura Hartmann <hartmann.la at husky.neu.edu>                (17)
        Subject: Call for Projects for the Issue 2 of the DHCommons Journal

  [3]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (34)
        Subject: "Where Code Comes From" -- new CACM column on the origins of
                computer programs


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2016 22:33:54 +0000
        From: Andrew Russell <arussell at stevens.edu>
        Subject: new issue of Computational Culture on rhetoric and computation


Colleagues - 

A new issue of the open access journal “Computational Culture” is now available at http://computationalculture.net/issue-five.  

For those who don’t know it, Computational Culture focuses on software and “cultural computational objects, practices, processes, and structures.”  While the journal’s scope does not explicitly name the history of computing or IT (see http://computationalculture.net/computational-culture), I am sure that many of the articles will be of interest to SIGCIS members.  

All the best,

Andy


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2016 14:10:49 -0500
        From: Laura Hartmann <hartmann.la at husky.neu.edu>
        Subject: Call for Projects for the Issue 2 of the DHCommons Journal


We are pleased to announce a Call for Projects for the Issue 2 of the
DHCommons Journal!

http://dhcommons.org/blog/2016/01/15/dhcommons-survey-and-cfp

Also, following the launch of its first issue
(http://dhcommons.org/journal/issue-1), DHCommons is seeking feedback from
the digital humanities community. Please see this survey
http://goo.gl/forms/9XMqxTIaEI  for input.

Padmini Ray Murray
Managing Editor of the *DHCommons* Journal

--
Laura Hartmann-Villalta
Editorial assistant at DHCommons  http://dhcommons.org/journal , the
official journal of centerNet
Instructor / Ph.D. Candidate
English Department
Northeastern University




--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 20 Jan 2016 06:20:56 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: "Where Code Comes From" -- new CACM column on the origins of computer programs
        In-Reply-To: <00fe01d1533c$f2b24e90$d816ebb0$@computer.org>



-------- Forwarded Message --------
> Subject: 	[SIGCIS-Members] "Where Code Comes From" -- new CACM column on
the origins of computer programs
> Date: 	Tue, 19 Jan 2016 22:42:19 -0600
> From: 	Thomas Haigh <thaigh at computer.org>
> Reply-To: 	thaigh at computer.org

Hello SIGCIS,

Hope you all had a pleasant New Year and enjoyed our unexpected moment
of global togetherness around the death of David Bowie.

I've just uploaded to my website a copy of the recent CACM column I
wrote with Mark Priestley. This is a kind of sequel to our previous
"Innovators Assemble" (now approaching 10,000 downloads), but with a
more technical focus. We wrote that Ada Lovelace's table of operations
was not, when looked at closely, a computer program. This, and our
current investigation of Colossus as a "programmable computer," made us
realize that the concepts of program and programmability have not been
very carefully defined in the current historical literature. The main
exception has been David Alan GrierÂ’s short articles in Annals on the
linguistic origins of "program" in the ENIAC project, with which we find
ourselves in general but not complete agreement.

The new article, "Where Code Comes From: Architectures of Automatic
Control from Babbage to Algol" tries to link the concept of "program" in
computing to its broader meaning as a sequence of things done over time
(as in a program of study, a concert program, or a washing machine
program). The analysis includes both a recapitulation of the early
history of automatic computing from this viewpoint and a discussion of
the adoption of the terms"program" and "programming."

You can find the article in the ACM Digital Library at
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2846088

If you do not have access, there's an unsecured copy at
http://www.tomandmaria.com/Tom/Writing/WhereCodeComesFromCACM.pdf

Best wishes,

Tom




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