[Humanist] 29.751 events: scope & reach of DH; classics; mss crowdsourcing

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Feb 29 14:52:10 CET 2016


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 751.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Neil Coffee <ncoffee at BUFFALO.EDU>                         (36)
        Subject: SCS 2017 Call for Papers: "Digital Classics and the Changing
                Profession"

  [2]   From:    Gabriele Civiliene <gabrielemucho at gmail.com>              (66)
        Subject: 2nd DDH Student Conference "Mapping the scope and reach of
                the digital humanities", 20 May 2016, King's College London

  [3]   From:    Tessa Whitehouse <m.t.whitehouse at qmul.ac.uk>               (8)
        Subject: EEBO for manuscripts? 1 March seminar


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 29 Feb 2016 07:46:32 -0500
        From: Neil Coffee <ncoffee at BUFFALO.EDU>
        Subject: SCS 2017 Call for Papers: "Digital Classics and the Changing Profession"



Call for Papers for the Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting,
Toronto, January 5-8, 2017
[Reminder: deadline March 9, 2016]

"Digital Classics and the Changing Profession"

Sponsored by the Digital Classics Association

Organized by Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY

The growth of the digital humanities is increasingly affecting the
professional life of classicists. Job ads have begun to ask for digital
humanities experience. Job seekers who have digital skills face an expanded
employment landscape, including not only to academic teaching positions, but
also post-docs on funded research projects, work at NGOs, and jobs at
private technology firms. Graduate students and graduate programs must
decide what sort of digital training is necessary for a career. Tenure and
promotion evaluators face the challenge of accounting for digital
scholarship. Abstracts are invited for presentations addressing how digital
methods are changing the shape of the profession in these and other ways,
and how students and faculty can respond.

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent to
digitalclassicsassociation at gmail.com, with identifying information in the
email. Abstracts will be refereed anonymously in accordance with SCS
regulations. Submitters should confirm in their emails that they are SCS
members in good standing. Abstracts should follow the formatting guidelines
of the instructions for individual abstracts on the SCS website. The
deadline for the submission of abstracts is **March 9, 2016**.

Note: All past DCA sessions have been joint colloquia of the Society for
Classical Studies and the Archaeological Institute of America. This panel
has been approved by SCS, with the application for a joint AIA colloquium
pending. AIA members are encouraged to submit, though there is no guarantee
at this point that the panel will be approved by AIA.

Links to this announcement on the DCA  http://dca.drupalgardens.com/   and
SCS
<https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2017/148/digital-classics-and-c
hanging-profession-afg-2017https:/classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2017/1
48/digital-classics-and-changing-profession-afg-2017%23sthash.c7mE0LSJ.dpuf>
websites.



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 29 Feb 2016 12:52:50 +0000
        From: Gabriele Civiliene <gabrielemucho at gmail.com>
        Subject: 2nd DDH Student Conference "Mapping the scope and reach of the digital humanities", 20 May 2016, King's College London


Call for papers: second Digital Humanities early career conference

Mapping the scope and reach of the digital humanities

20 May 2016 | King’s College London, Strand Campus

This year’s conference theme is: Mapping the scope and reach of the
digital humanities. Since computing in the humanities was renamed to what
it is nowadays called ‘digital humanities’ (DH), the field has shifted
significantly in its scope and has gained importance as an academic
discipline. The DH is envisaged to encompass a range of interests and tasks
such as “refurbishing the humanities for an electronic age” (McCarty 2005),
manipulating texts (Bradley 2004), gathering big data for macroanalysis
(Jockers 2013), distant reading (Moretti 2013), building rather than
writing for algorithmic criticism (Ramsay 2011), speculative computing and
visual forms (Drucker 2008), to name a few.

The digital has undoubtedly cut across the humanities disciplines, but how
wide is its reach? Is the DH inclusive enough as “a trading zone and a
meeting place”, as defined by Svensson (2012)? What do the other
disciplines have to teach digital humanities? Are we capable of inventing
any new functions of the digital within and for the traditional scope of
the humanities? How responsive are the institutions to the new demands and
ideas of researching the digital? What forms and areas of collaborative
research have been missing? Do the collaborative projects overshadow a
single scholar’s effort and will in any way? Are the digital tools going
hand in hand with the needs of humanities research, theory and pedagogy?

We would like to put these and many other historical, empirical and
pedagogical aspects of the digital in the humanities on the agenda of the
DDH Student Conference 2016 at King’s. We invite humanists, regardless of
their technical background, to share their ideas and research on the past,
present and future issues of the digital in and for the humanities.

Keynote sessions include:

   - “Quality in Quantity? Stylometry on Ever Bigger Data” | Jan Rybicki,
   Assistant Professor of English Studies at the Jagiellonian University
   of Kraków, Poland
   - “Community Building in the Digital Humanities” | James Cummings,
   Senior Digital Research Specialist for the IT Services of the University of
   Oxford
   - “Open Access and Multi-media Monographs” | Rupert Gatti,
   co-founder and Director of Open Book Publishers and Director of Studies in
   Economics at Trinity College, Cambridge
   - “Researching Born-digital Data” | Jane Winters, Professor of
   Digital History and Head of Publications at the Institute of Historical
   Research

The event will also feature a roundtable discussion chaired by Professor
Willard McCarty, Professor of Humanities Computing in the Department of
Digital Humanities at King's College London.

The conference committee seeks proposals for:

   - Research paper presentations - submissions should include: a title,
   author list (including names, email addresses and institutional
   affiliations) and an abstract for the proposed presentation (no more than
   250 words in length). Presentations on the day should last no more than 15
   minutes and will be followed by five minutes of discussion time.
   - Poster or digital art presentations - submissions should include: a
   title, author list (including names, email addresses and institutional
   affiliations) and an abstract for the proposed poster or digital art
   exhibit (no more than 250 words in length). Please note: creativity is
   greatly encouraged in these presentations. Your work does not need to be in
   the form of a traditional poster and can include digital elements (for
   example animation or design) - please email us to propose your idea.

Further information will be made available through the conference website
(TBC), Twitter feed <https://twitter.com/KCLDHCONF> and Facebook page
<https://www.facebook.com/kcldhconf/>. Submissions should be made by midnight
on 11 April 2016 by emailing kcldhconf at gmail.com. Please indicate in
your email whether you wish to propose a presentation, poster or both.
Decisions on acceptance of abstracts will be communicated to applicants no
later than 18 April 2016.

Gabriele Salciute Civiliene
PhD Student, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College

E-mail: gabriele.salciute-civiliene at kcl.ac.uk

--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 29 Feb 2016 12:40:52 +0000
        From: Tessa Whitehouse <m.t.whitehouse at qmul.ac.uk>
        Subject: EEBO for manuscripts? 1 March seminar


A reminder about the next QMUL Digital Humanities Seminar, taking place tomorrow – all very welcome!

Victoria Van Hyning (Oxford), 'Crowdsourcing early modern manuscript transcription, or, Can we really have an EEBO for manuscripts?'

Tuesday 1 March
ArtsTwo, 2.17
5.15-6.45pm

"Early modernists working on English language material have experienced a seismic change in their research landscape with the ability to conduct full text search of printed works in Early English Books Online, Eighteenth Century Collections Online, Googlebooks and other resources. Hardly an essay, article or seminar paper goes by without reference to word frequency within the EEBO or ECCO corpus. But what of the endless acres of manuscript material that have never been edited and which are not machine-readable? At precisely the moment when basic quantitative methodologies in the humanities are becoming more normative—and when we could take further steps to introduce deeper quantitative approaches in our work—we are in danger of leaving the lion’s share of material out of the reach of quantitative analysis.

This talk will provide an overview of ‘Shakespeare’s World’: a collaboration between the world-leading academic crowdsourcing group called Zooniverse.org, the Folger Shakespeare Library which heads up the Early Modern Manuscripts Online project, and the Oxford English Dictionary. ‘Shakespeare’s World’, which launched in December 2015, invites members of the public to transcribe manuscript material from the Folger collection. The site has been designed to enable people to transcribe as little as one word on a page, and does not force users to guess or misread for the sake of page completion. Multiple volunteers transcribe independently, and their transcriptions are then compared using an in-house algorithm that detects differences between transcriptions as well as outputting an aggregated reading as well as a list of variant readings.

The project will have launched with two genres available for transcription: recipes and letters, totaling c. 8,5000 pages. The Zooniverse crowd of ~1.4 million people will likely see several thousand try the project, and a few hundred stay for the longer term. Victoria hopes to identify material suitable for her British Academy postdoctoral fellowship work, which concerns early modern English Catholic women’s life-writing. In addition to tracing the rationale and trajectory of this crowdsourcing project, the talk will present early finding as to the suitability of crowdsourced transcriptions for facilitating basic quantitative approaches to early modern manuscript studies."





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