[Humanist] 29.711 events: semantic web; visualisation & the arts; Roman trials

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Feb 15 07:46:58 CET 2016


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 711.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Olivier Bruneau <olivier.bruneau at UNIV-LORRAINE.FR>        (45)
        Subject: Workshop on Semantic Web for Scientific Heritage, may 30

  [2]   From:    Jason Ensor <J.Ensor at westernsydney.edu.au>                (19)
        Subject: Electronic Visualisation and the Arts 2016

  [3]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (20)
        Subject: Roman Republican trials


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 14 Feb 2016 20:59:01 +0100
        From: Olivier Bruneau <olivier.bruneau at UNIV-LORRAINE.FR>
        Subject: Workshop on Semantic Web for Scientific Heritage, may 30


Second Int. Workshop on Semantic Web for Scientific Heritage, SW4SH 2016

http://www.cepam.cnrs.fr/zoomathia/sw4sh/  

Important dates:
- Due date for paper submission: March 11, 2016
- Notification of paper acceptance : April 1, 2016
- Camera-ready version of accepted papers: April 15, 2016
- Workshop: May 30, 2016

SW4SH 2016 will be held in conjunction with the 13th ESWC 2016 Conference which takes place between 29th May and 2nd June in Heraklion, Crete, Greece.

SW4SH 2016 is a continuation of the SW4SH workshop series initiated at ESWC 2015 which aims to provide a leading international and interdisciplinary forum for disseminating the latest research in the field of Semantic Web for the preservation and exploitation of our scientific heritage, the study of the history of ideas and their transmission.

Classicists and historians are interested in developing textual databases, in order to gather and explore large amounts of primary source materials. For a long time, they mainly focused on text digitization and markup. They only recently decided to try to explore the possibility of transferring some analytical processes they previously thought incompatible with automation to knowledge engineering systems, thus taking advantage of the growing set of tools and techniques based on the languages and standards of the semantic Web, such as linked data, ontologies, and automated reasoning. The iconographic data, which are also relevant in history of science and arise similar problematic could be addressed as well and offer suggestive insights for a global methodology for diverse media.

On the other hand, Semantic Web researchers are willing to take up more ambitious challenges than those arising in the native context of the Web in terms of anthropological complexity, addressing meta-semantic problems of flexible, pluralist or evolutionary ontologies, sources heterogeneity, hermeneutic and rhetoric dimensions. Thus the opportunity for a fruitful encounter of knowledge engineers with computer-savvy historians and classicists has come. This encounter may be inscribed within the more general context of digital humanities, a research area at the intersection of computing and the humanities disciplines which is gaining an ever-increasing momentum and where the Linked Open Data is playing an increasingly prominent role.

The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for discussion about the methodological approaches to the specificity of annotating “scientific” texts (in the wide sense of the term, including disciplines such as history, architecture, or rhetoric), and to support a collaborative reflection, on possible guidelines or specific models for building historical ontologies. The iconographic data, which are also relevant in history of science and arise similar problematic could be addressed as well and offer suggestive insights for a global methodology for diverse media. A key goal of the workshop, focusing on research issues related to pre-modern scientific texts, is to emphasize, through precise projects and up-to-date investigation in digital humanities, the benefit of a multidisciplinary research to create and operate on relevantly structured data. One of the main interests of the very topic of pre-modern historical data management lies in historical semantics, and the opportunity to jointly consider how to identify and express lexical, theoretical and material evolutions. Dealing with historical texts, a major problem is indeed to handle the discrepancy of the historical terminology compared to the modern one, and, in the case of massive, diachronic data, to take into account the contextual and theoretical meaning of terms and segments of texts and their semantics.

Topics covered by the workshop include but are not limited to:
- Ontologies and vocabularies in Ancient Science
- Semantic annotation of ancient and medieval scientific texts
- Information/knowledge extraction from archaeological objects and texts
- Semantic integration of heterogeneous and contradicting knowledge
- Representation of the historical dimension of Scientific Knowledge
- Impact of Semantic Web technologies on Digital Humanities
- Knowledge Engineering for ancient zoological science and literature
- Social Web, collaborative systems, tagging, and user feedback

Paper Submission:
We invite short position papers (4-6 pages) and regular research papers (8-12 pages) describing innovative ideas covering the topics of the workshop.
Submissions must be written in English and follow the LNCS guidelines. For details see the Springer LNCS Author Instructions page.
Papers must be submitted via Easychair:https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sw4sh2016  .
Accepted papers will be published in the CEUR workshop proceedings series.

Workshop organizers:
Isabelle Draelants, IRHT
Catherine Faron Zucker, Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis
Alexandre Monnin, Inria
Arnaud Zucker, Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis

Contact:
For any question, please contact the organizers via email:sw4sh2016 at easychair.org

-- 
Olivier Bruneau

Maître de conférences à l'UFR Maths-Info de l'Université de Lorraine
Pôle Lorrain de Gestion
13, Rue Michel Ney
CO 75
54037 Nancy Cedex

Chercheur au LHSP-Archives Poincaré (UMR 7117)
91 avenue de la Libération - BP 454
F-54001 NANCY Cedex

03 72 74 15 68




--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 14 Feb 2016 23:59:36 +0000
        From: Jason Ensor <J.Ensor at westernsydney.edu.au>
        Subject: Electronic Visualisation and the Arts 2016


Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVAA) is an interdisciplinary conference on visual technologies in culture, the arts and humanities to be held in Canberra on 5th to 6th March, 2016 to coincide with the Canberra Enlighten festival. EVAA welcome scholars, practitioners and professionals from fields including digital humanities, computer and information science, design, media, art practice, GLAM and heritage. In all these fields data and its representations are transforming practice and scholarship: this conference is about how we respond to this challenge.

Speakers at the conference include:

·         Sarah Kenderdine,

·         Deb Verhoeven,

·         Mitchell Whitelaw,

·         Tim Sherratt,

·         Chris McDowall and

·         Deborah Lupton

In addition to these wonderful presenters, there is a line-up of papers from scholars in the field.  Full details, including conference program and registration details are on the web at:

http://evaa.com.au

-----

Dr Jason Ensor<http://www.uws.edu.au/staff_profiles/uws_profiles/doctor_jason_ensor>
Research & Technical Development Manager, Digital Humanities
Chief Investigator: Mapping Print, Charting Enlightenment<http://fbtee.uws.edu.au/mpce/> (ARC DP160103488)
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University, Australia
P +61 2 9685 9891 | F  + 61 2 9685 9075
www.jasonensor.com http://www.jasonensor.com/




--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 15 Feb 2016 06:26:09 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: Roman Republican trials


Workshop: Roman Republican Trials: a Digital Edition
Venue: Skutsch Room, Gordon House, University College London
Date: Friday 19th February 2016, 2-6.30pm

Programme attached. Of particular interest to those here is the session 
at the end of the workshop:

5.10 Alice Borgna (University of Piemonte Orientale, Italy)
"˜Let's go digital: Classics and Digital Humanities, some case-studies"™

5.50 Michael Sperberg-McQueen (Black Mesa Technologies LLC, USA)
"˜Technical challenges of TLRR2: infrastructure on a shoe-string for a 
distributed project"™

6.30 drinks
All welcome!

For information please contact Valentina Arena (v.arena at ucl.ac.uk)
-- 
Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
Humanities, King's College London, and Digital Humanities Research
Group, Western Sydney University

*** Attachments:
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1455517921_2016-02-15_willard.mccarty@mccarty.org.uk_18846.2.pdf




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