[Humanist] 29.700 events: art & archaeology; documentary edns; methods for media

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Feb 9 07:15:12 CET 2016


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 700.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Darrell Meadows <darrell.meadows at nara.gov>                (59)
        Subject: Webinar: Publishing Historical Records in Documentary
                Editions

  [2]   From:    "Wells, Sarah P. (spw4s)" <spw4s at eservices.virginia.edu>  (23)
        Subject: Duke Symposium on Digital Pedagogy & Research in Art,
                Archaeology

  [3]   From:    Jason Ensor <J.Ensor at westernsydney.edu.au>                (20)
        Subject: CFP : ANZCA 2016 Panel : The state of digital methods for
                media and communication research


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 09:05:16 -0500
        From: Darrell Meadows <darrell.meadows at nara.gov>
        Subject: Webinar: Publishing Historical Records in Documentary Editions


The National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) of the
National Archives supports projects that promote access to America's
historical records to encourage understanding of our democracy, history,
and culture. Potential applicants to the NHPRC’s Publishing Historical
Records in Documentary Editions program are invited to attend an upcoming
webinar on the program and application process. Webinar times and
instructions appear at the end of this message.

The webinar is intended for both currently-funded and new applicants
preparing for the upcoming June 15, 2016 deadline, as well as those who may
be considering preparation of an application for the fall cycle (deadline
October 6, 2016).

The NHPRC seeks proposals to publish documentary editions of historical
records. Projects may focus on the papers of major figures from American
history or cover broad historical movements in politics, military,
business, social reform, the arts, and other aspects of the national
experience. The historical value of the records and their expected
usefulness to broad audiences must justify the costs of the project.

The goal of this program is to provide access to, and editorial context
for, the historical documents and records that tell the American story. The
NHPRC encourages projects, whenever possible and appropriate, to provide
access to these materials in a free and open online environment, without
precluding other forms of publication.

Grants are awarded for collecting, describing, preserving, compiling,
transcribing, annotating, editing, encoding, and publishing documentary
source materials in print and online. Because of the focus on documentary
sources, grants do not support preparation of critical editions of
published works unless such works are just a small portion of the larger
project.

A grant is for one year and for up to $200,000. The Commission expects to
make up to 25 grants in this category for a total of up to $2,500,000.
Grants begin no earlier than January 1, 2017.

First Deadline: Any currently funded NHPRC documentary edition project:
Funding Opportunity Number: EDITIONS-201606. Draft (optional): April 4,
2016. Final Deadline: June 15, 2016. NHPRC support begins no earlier than
January 1, 2017.

Second Deadline: Any currently funded NHPRC documentary edition project and
any project seeking first time support: Funding Opportunity Number:
EDITIONS-201610. Draft (optional): August 1, 2016. Final Deadline: October
6, 2016. NHPRC support begins no earlier than July 1, 2017.

The webinar will be held on the following date and time:

Wednesday, 24 February @ 3:00 p.m. Eastern

Webinar attendees will need to click on the following link:
https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?ExEventID=89909710 and enter their
name and email address. You do not need to pre-register for the webinar.
Please email darrell.meadows at nara.gov if you have any questions.

To view the FY2017 Publishing Historical Records in Documentary Editions
announcement in full, visit:
http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/editions.html.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
R. Darrell Meadows, Ph.D.
Director for Publishing
National Historical Publications and Records Commission
National Archives and Records Administration
700 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 114
Washington, DC 20408
P: 202.357.5321
F: 202.357.5914
darrell.meadows at nara.gov
www.archives.gov/nhprc



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 18:54:40 +0000
        From: "Wells, Sarah P. (spw4s)" <spw4s at eservices.virginia.edu>
        Subject: Duke Symposium on Digital Pedagogy & Research in Art, Archaeology


"Apps, Maps & Model: Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology & Visual Studies."
Duke University
22 February

The Wired! Group (www.dukewired.org) at Duke University is hosting a one-day symposium on "Apps, Maps & Model: Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology & Visual Studies." It will be held from 8:30am-6:30pm on February 22 at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke. Speakers will discuss how digital tools are prompting new approaches to teaching and research and transforming how scholars and museums communicate to the public. Speakers include Suzanne Preston Blier, Donal Cooper, Ingrid Daubechies, Michael T. Davis, Pamela Fletcher, Paul B. Jaskot, C. Griffith Mann, Fabrizio Nevola, Philip Stinson, and UVA's Dorothy Wong.

Registration is free. For more information, see <http://sites.duke.edu/digsymposium/>.

Sincerely yours,
Sarah

---------------------------

Sarah Wells
Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities
spw4s at virginia.edu    434-924-4370

O proud left foot, that ventures quick within
Then soon upon a backward journey lithe.
Anon, once more the gesture, then begin:
Command sinistral pedestal to writhe.
Commence thou then the fervid Hokey-Poke,
A mad gyration, hips in wanton swirl.
To spin! A wilde release from Heavens yoke.
Blessed dervish! Surely canst go, girl.
The Hoke, the poke -- banish now thy doubt
Verily, I saw, 'tis what it's all about.

(Jeff Brechlin, Potomac Falls.
Stolen from the Washington Post's Style Invitational Week CLXI)



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 23:31:12 +0000
        From: Jason Ensor <J.Ensor at westernsydney.edu.au>
        Subject: CFP : ANZCA 2016 Panel : The state of digital methods for media and communication research


[via aaDH]

Call for Papers, ANZCA 2016

Scraping the Political, Economical and Social: The state of digital methods for media and communication research

Media and communication researchers have embraced the computational and digitisation turns (Rogers, 2014), which have notably seen the multidisciplinary inclusion of computer science with the humanities. From early methods that some argued over-claimed their impact, towards contemporary approaches that have been nuanced and improved by researchers and specialists, digital media methods are a useful collection of ‘how to’ tools to research social, economical and political sites. Globally, multiple researchers and institutions have developed cutting edge technologies that enable a large proportion of media and communication researchers to interrogate existing research sites in new ways. Additionally, these digital media methods have enabled researchers to find new research environments through data repositories, big data, digital media platforms, and social media, for example. Our interest in digital data will increase further as we see new cultural practices emerge through activities associated with drones, autonomous automobiles, sensors, and the internet of things.

There remains a significant gap, however, in our current media and communication methodologies and current research technology. While we are able to identify conversations of public concern and how they inform ‘issues’ (Burgess & Matamoros, 2016), there remains a problem of how to integrate cultural context (humour, geography, history, etc.) into our understanding of large social media data sets. Further, the increasing shift away from text-based communication towards visual methods, i.e. Instagram, instigates a methodological conundrum (Highfield and Leaver, 2016). Finally, while the efforts of Wills (2016), Fordyce et al. (2016), Bruns et al. (2016) and Dowd (2016) advance our understanding of ontologies and typographies of social media data, further work needs to be undertaken to standardise our collection and analysis methods of digital media. Collectively, these issues present problems in data gathering techniques, research design, university ethics and access for digital media research methods.

We are seeking contributions from scholars for a ‘progression session’ at the 2016 Australia and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA) that can address one or many of the following:

1.       What are the cutting edge examples of digital media methods in media and communication research?

2.       How can we integrate cultural contexts into the broad computational approach of digital platform research?

3.       How can we as media and communication researchers access digital media tools for our own projects?

4.       How should we approach ontologies and/or typologies for digital media research?

5.       How do we negotiate these emerging research areas with our university ethics boards?

Contributions to this panel will form the basis for a collected edition on digital media research methods.

Please send your 400 word abstract, noting which area you are addressing, to Jonathon Hutchinson at jonathon.hutchinson at sydney.edu.au<mailto:jonathon.hutchinson at sydney.edu.au> before 26 February, 2016.

--
For inquiries about this list, please contact:
Dr Jason Ensor | Research & Technical Development, Digital Humanities
School of Humanities and Communication Arts
Western Sydney University
P +61 2 9685 9891 | F + 61 2 9685 9075
westernsydney.edu.au





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