[Humanist] 29.291 cfp: JADH journal; literary boundaries; intertextuality in ancient languages

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Sep 16 10:01:08 CEST 2015


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 291.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Charles Muller <acmuller at l.u-tokyo.ac.jp>                 (17)
        Subject: CFP: Journal of the Japanese Association of Digital
                Humanities

  [2]   From:    Hugh Houghton <h.a.g.houghton at BHAM.AC.UK>                 (22)
        Subject: Call for Contribution: Special Issue on Computer-Aided
                Processing of Intertextuality in Ancient Languages

  [3]   From:    Scott Kushner <scott.kushner at gmail.com>                   (27)
        Subject: CFP--Literary Boundary Work: Big Data and Comparative Non-
                Literature,  ACLA 2016, abstracts 9/23


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 15 Sep 2015 18:29:47 +0900
        From: Charles Muller <acmuller at l.u-tokyo.ac.jp>
        Subject: CFP: Journal of the Japanese Association of Digital Humanities
        In-Reply-To: <55EA7FB8.9040405 at l.u-tokyo.ac.jp>

Dear Colleagues,

Having successfully completed our first volume, we are now seeking
submissions for Volume 2 of the JJADH. Please see

http://www.jadh.org/journals/index.php/jjadh/announcement/view/1

Regards,

Charles

---------------------------
A. Charles Muller

Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology
Faculty of Letters
University of Tokyo
7-3-1 Hongō, Bunkyō-ku
Tokyo 113-8654, Japan

Office Phone: 03-5841-3735

Web Site: Resources for East Asian Language and Thought
http://www.acmuller.net

Twitter: @H_Buddhism



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 15 Sep 2015 09:54:24 +0000
        From: Hugh Houghton <h.a.g.houghton at BHAM.AC.UK>
        Subject: Call for Contribution: Special Issue on Computer-Aided Processing of Intertextuality in Ancient Languages
        In-Reply-To: <55EA7FB8.9040405 at l.u-tokyo.ac.jp>


Call for Contributions

Special Issue on
Computer-Aided Processing of Intertextuality in Ancient Languages
[ms]

 “Europe's future is digital”. This was the headline of a speech given at the Hannover exhibition in April 2015 by Günther Oettinger, EU-Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society. While businesses and industries have already made major advances in digital ecosystems, the digital transformation of texts stretching over a period of more than two millennia is far from complete. On the one hand, mass digitisation leads to an „information overload“ of digitally available data; on the other, the “information poverty” embodied by the loss of books and the fragmentary state of ancient texts form an incomplete and biased view of our past. In a digital ecosystem, this coexistence of data overload and poverty adds considerable complexity to scholarly research.

With this special issue on Computer-Aided Processing of Intertextuality in Ancient Languages, the HiSoMA lab in Lyon, France, and the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities Germany, aim to create a collection of papers that discuss the state-of-the-art on intertextuality, linguistic preprocessing and the preservation of scholarly research results specifically applied to corpora in ancient languages and for which few online resources exist (Ancient Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Syriac, Coptic, Arabic, Ethiopic, etc.).

Relevant topics include:

  *   Methods for the detection of intertexts and text reuse, manual (e.g. crowd-sourcing) or automatic (e.g. algorithms);
  *   Infrastructure for the preservation of digital texts and quotations between different text passages;
  *   Linguistic preprocessing and data normalisation, such as lemmatisation of historical languages, root stemming, normalisation of variants, etc.;
  *   Visualisation of intertextuality and text reuse;
  *   Creation of, and research on, stemmata.

The special issue will be published by the Journal on Data Mining and Digital Humanities (<http://jdmdh.episciences.org/>http://jdmdh.episciences.org/), an online open access journal that will release the issue shortly after its submission in order to elicit feedback from readers while concurrently supervising the standard peer review process.

Interested authors are asked to:

1) send a title, an author list and a one page (or shorter) abstract specifying the type of contribution (full paper or project presentation) to

Laurence Mellerin: laurence.mellerin(at)mom(dot)fr AND
Marco Büchler: mbuechler(at)gcdh(dot)de

by October 31st.

2) send a paper (long: up to 40 pages OR short: 2 to 4 pages illustrating the scope and research of the project), following the guidelines of JDMDH, which can be found at http://jdmdh.episciences.org/page/submissions

by January 31st 2016.

For further questions, do not hesitate to contact Laurence and Marco.
http://jdmdh.episciences.org/page/call-for-contribution-special-issue



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 15 Sep 2015 13:45:52 -0400
        From: Scott Kushner <scott.kushner at gmail.com>
        Subject: CFP--Literary Boundary Work: Big Data and Comparative Non-Literature,  ACLA 2016, abstracts 9/23
        In-Reply-To: <55EA7FB8.9040405 at l.u-tokyo.ac.jp>


CALL FOR PAPERS

Literary Boundary Work: Big Data and Comparative Non-Literature
A seminar proposal for ACLA 2016, next March 17-20 at Harvard

Abstracts by September 23 and further details at
http://www.acla.org/node/5114
Questions to Scott Kushner, scottkushner at uri.edu

Convened by Scott Kushner (Communication Studies, URI) and Jonathan Abel
(Comp Lit, Penn State)

Literary study draws its boundaries too narrowly.  This is why as the
discipline that continually seeks "literature plus ______” (another
language, a new theory, a different medium), comparative literature shines
brightest when it engages methodologies and objects from both within and
beyond the traditional limits of literary studies.

A new century brought novel forms of writing and criticism, though many
practitioners of literary study still tread gingerly around status updates
and comments, TEI and corpuses.  Recent critical techniques for textual
interpretation may reveal as illusory close reading's long monopoly on
research and pedagogy.  New textual cultures in everyday networked media
continue to trouble the discipline's notions of the literary.  Taken
together, such shifts in methodology and object can reshape and rejuvenate
literary studies.

This seminar will ask what is new and what has stayed the same in
comparative literature.  Papers will map emergent and resilient
methodologies, survey the current boundaries of the field, and inventory
the professional practices that legitimize the discipline.  As scholars
apply new tools to new texts in new ways, what continues to hold
comparative literature together and distinguish it from neighboring fields?





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