[Humanist] 29.3 events: Tim Hitchcock on the voices of dead criminals

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu May 7 10:09:35 CEST 2015


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 3.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Wed, 6 May 2015 12:20:02 +0000
        From: "Bradley, John" <john.bradley at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: DDH Seminar: Tuesday 12 May, 6.15 K3.11: Prof Tim Hitchcock: Listening to the voices of dead criminals in a virtual courtroom


The Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London, invites all to its next public seminar:

Tuesday 12 May, 6.15 pm (see details below, note location KCL Room K3.11)

We'd be pleased if you could join us.        

 ... John Bradley and Gabriel Bodard

-------------------------------------------------------------------
When: 12th May (Tuesday): 18:15 start
Where: Room K3.11, King's Building
King's College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS

Listening to the voices of dead criminals in a virtual courtroom:

Reconstructing the Old Bailey, c.1800.

Professor Timothy Hitchcock (Professor of Digital History, University of Sussex)
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/profiles/336034

This paper reflects ongoing work to reconstruct the courtroom at the Old Bailey, as a first step in combining textual analysis of trial reports, with a spatial analysis of the 'experience' of being tried for your life. In the years following the Gordon Riots in 1780, the courtroom at the Old Bailey in London was rebuilt repeatedly.   In the process this theatre of justice was transformed from one in which the victim, defendant and jurors, formed the lead actors, into a set that placed barristers centre stage - changing how speech was heard, and voiced.

This paper reports on progress in creating a virtual courtroom, and describes the tools and approaches being used to integrate the resulting spatial analysis with textual readings of trial reports, and longitudinal life histories of convicted criminals.






More information about the Humanist mailing list