[Humanist] 28.854 pubs: Festschrift with some Web history; Stanford LitLab 9

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Mar 26 07:45:42 CET 2015


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 854.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (66)
        Subject: Tabula Gratulatoria for Donnchadh Ó Corráin festschrift

  [2]   From:    Stanford Literary Lab <literarylab at stanford.edu>          (22)
        Subject: Literary Lab Pamphlet 9: Franco Moretti and Dominique
                Pestre, "Bankspeak: The Language of World Bank Reports,
                1946-2012


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 25 Mar 2015 12:47:56 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: Tabula Gratulatoria for Donnchadh Ó Corráin festschrift


[The Festschrift announced below is in honour of Donnchadh Ó Corráin,
for many years Professor of Medieval History at University College Cork.
I am forwarding it here to signal Professor Ó Corráin's rather amazingly
early insight into the importance of the Web. In 1991, three months
after the Web itself went online, UCC Computing Centre, in the person of
Peter Flynn, responded to Ó Corráin's request to put his Thesaurus
Linguarum Hiberniae online by establishing for it the first Web server
in Ireland and the ninth in the world. I tell as much of the story as I
have been able to unearth on pp. 524-7. Let us hope that the Festschrift
itself is put online someday. --WM]

INVITATION 

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

We invite you to subscribe to the Tabula Gratulatoria for/Clerics, Kings and
Vikings/, a collection of essays on medieval Ireland in honour of Donnchadh
Ó Corráin, edited by Emer Purcell, Paul MacCotter, Julianne Nyhan & John
Sheehan. The book will appear in hardback and will be published in summer
2015.

Subscribers to the Tabula Gratulatoria are entitled to the discounted
pre-publication price of €50/GB£40/US$60, post included [Retail prices:
€60/£55/$85] . To subscribe, please send payment, together with your
mailing address and your name by 20 April 2015.

Please send your mailing address and your name as you would like it to
appear in the book (in the format first name, surname – titles will not be
included) to meghan.donaldson at fourcourtspress.ie. All cheques should be made
payable to Four Courts Press and sent to Four Courts Press, 7 Malpas Street,
Dublin 8, Ireland. If you would like to pay by credit card please contact
Meghan Donaldson at the e-mail address above.

Clerics, Kings and Vikings: Essays on medieval Ireland in honour of
Donnchadh Ó Corráin

This volume contains contributions from leading scholars working at the
forefront of Irish medieval studies. It includes essays on archaeology,
ecclesiology, hagiography, medieval history, genealogy, language, literature
and toponymy. Subjects explored include: Latin and learning in early
medieval Ireland; the historical context of early medieval literature;
Viking armies and the importance of the Hiberno-Norse naval fleets; Ireland
and its connections with the Scandinavian world; recent studies of wooden
and Romanesque churches in pre- Norman Ireland; the coming of the
Anglo-Normans; hitherto unpublished Anglo-Norman charters; the origin and
function of medieval rural deaneries; secular and ecclesiastical histories
of later medieval Kilkenny; and the ‘named son’ in 16th-century
Ireland.

Contributors:

Michael Herren (York U), Edel Bhreathnach (Discovery Programme), Charles
Doherty (RSAI), Joseph J. Flahive (UCC), Wendy Davies (UCL), Dagmar Ó
Riain-Raedel & Pádraig Ó Riain (UCC), Poul Holm (TCD), Colmán Etchingham
(MU), Catherine Swift (UL), Seán Duffy (TCD), David N. Dumville (U
Aberdeen), Marie Therese Flanagan (QUB), Diarmuid Ó Murchadha† (UCC),
Paul MacCotter (UCC), John Bradley† (MU), Kenneth Nicholls (UCC), Nollaig
Ó Muraíle (NUIG), Benjamin Hazard (UCC), Dáibhí Ó Cróinín (NUIG),
Dagfinn Skre (U Oslo), James Graham-Campbell (UCL), John Maas
(archaeologist), Patrick F. Wallace (ind.), Eamonn P. Kelly (NMI), Raghnall
Ó Floinn (NMI), Niamh Whitfield (ind.), Michael A. Monk (UCC), Conleth
Manning (National Monuments Service), Tomás Ó Carragáin (UCC), David
Woods (UCC), Anthony Harvey (RIA), David Howlett (Bodleian Library Oxford),
Sinéad O’Sullivan (QUB), Marina Smyth (Notre Dame), Jonathan Wooding (U
Sydney), Elva Johnston (UCD), John Carey (UCC), Bart Jaski (Utrecht U),
Kevin Murray (UCC), Peter J. Smith (UU), Gísli Sigurðsson (Árni
Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies), Emma Nic Cárthaigh (UL),
Beatrix Färber (UCC), Willard McCarty (King’s College London).

Emer Purcell is a coordinator of the /Forum for Medieval and Renaissance
Studies in Ireland/. Paul MacCotter is a part-time lecturer in the Schools
of History and Adult Continuing Education, University College Cork. Dr
Julianne Nyhan is lecturer in Digital Information Studies in the Department
of Information Studies, University College London.  

John Sheehan is a senior lecturer in the Department of Archaeology, University College
Cork.

See: http://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/2015/clerics-kings-and-vikings/

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 25 Mar 2015 19:42:37 +0000
        From: Stanford Literary Lab <literarylab at stanford.edu>
        Subject: Literary Lab Pamphlet 9: Franco Moretti and Dominique Pestre, "Bankspeak: The Language of World Bank Reports, 1946-2012


Literary Lab Pamphlet 9: Franco Moretti and Dominique Pestre,  “Bankspeak: The Language of World Bank Reports,  1946-2012”

A literary historian and a sociologist of science analyze how the World Bank presents – and justifies – its role within the global economy. Focusing on the Bank’s semantic and grammatical patterns, Moretti and Pestre provide a path-breaking study of an “institutional” language, and of the neo-liberal rhetoric of recent decades.

All pamphlets of the Literary Lab can be downloaded at: http://litlab.stanford.edu/?page_id=255

1. “Quantitative Formalism: An Experiment”
Sarah Allison, Ryan Heuser, Matthew Jockers, Franco Moretti, Michael Witmore

2. “Network Theory, Plot Analysis”
Franco Moretti

3. “Becoming Yourself: The Afterlife of Reception”
Ed Finn

4. “A Quantitative Literary History of 2,958 Nineteenth-Century British Novels: The Semantic Cohort Method”
Ryan Heuser, Long Le-Khac

5. “Style at the Scale of the Sentence”
Sarah Allison, Marissa Gemma, Ryan Heuser, Franco Moretti, Amir Tevel, Irena Yamboliev

6. “ ‘Operationalizing’: or, the Function of Measurement in Modern Literary Theory”
Franco Moretti

7. “Loudness in the Novel”
Holst Katsma

8. "Between Canon and Corpus: Six Perspectives on 20th-Century Novels”
Mark Algee-Hewitt, Mark McGurl

*** Attachments:
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1427322721_2015-03-25_literarylab@stanford.edu_9714.1.1.html
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1427322721_2015-03-25_literarylab@stanford.edu_9714.2.pdf




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