[Humanist] 28.832 the rise of "just plain theory"

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Mar 19 07:34:15 CET 2015


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 832.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
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  [1]   From:    Gabriel Egan <mail at gabrielegan.com>                       (16)
        Subject: Re:  28.828 the rise of "just plain theory"?

  [2]   From:    Rehberge MSU <rehberge at msu.edu>                            (4)
        Subject: Re:  28.828 the rise of "just plain theory"?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2015 08:19:02 +0000
        From: Gabriel Egan <mail at gabrielegan.com>
        Subject: Re:  28.828 the rise of "just plain theory"?
        In-Reply-To: <20150318062622.C638DC03 at digitalhumanities.org>

Willard McCarty asks:

 > My question is this: has anyone written fromu
 > an historical perspective about why "just plain theory"
 > (Culler's phrase) became so attractive when it did?

I have. Influenced by Terry Eagleton's historical
account of theory I argue that Paris 1968 is the
key to the rise of theory in literary scholarship.
The argument appears in "Chapter 3. Marx's Influence
on Shakespeare Studies since 1968" in my book
_Shakespeare and Marx_ (Oxford: Oxford University Press,
2004), especially pages 71-77. The book is available
in Open Access form at

   http://gabrielegan.com/publications/Egan2004a.pdf

Regards

Gabriel Egan
De Montfort University



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2015 17:58:07 -0400
        From: Rehberge MSU <rehberge at msu.edu>
        Subject: Re:  28.828 the rise of "just plain theory"?
        In-Reply-To: <20150318062622.C638DC03 at digitalhumanities.org>


There is a nice volume by Peter Herman entitled 'historicizing theory’  The introduction can be found here https://www.sunypress.edu/pdf/60870.pdf   One primary point that I tend to agree with is that most histories of theory are not very historical and tend to follow the great men with great ideas approach as history.  There are a ton of histories of theory in it many guises.

One excellent book on the history of theory is Robert Young’s ‘Postcolonialism’ which I think deftly and correctly ties the history of theory to colonialism.

Best

Dean




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