[Humanist] 29.129 events crowdsourcing; libraries

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Jun 29 23:36:43 CEST 2015


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 129.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Stuart Dunn <stuart.dunn at kcl.ac.uk>                       (50)
        Subject: CITIZEN HUMANITIES COMES OF AGE: CROWDSOURCING FOR THE 21ST
                CENTURY

  [2]   From:    Bethany Nowviskie <bnowviskie at CLIR.ORG>                   (12)
        Subject: help shape the 2015 DLF Forum!


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 13:20:45 +0100
        From: Stuart Dunn <stuart.dunn at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: CITIZEN HUMANITIES COMES OF AGE: CROWDSOURCING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY


CITIZEN HUMANITIES COMES OF AGE: 
CROWDSOURCING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
9th and 10th September 2015
Anatomy Lecture Theatre (K6.29)
Strand Campus, King's College London

Research in the humanities was once the preserve of an academic and 
professional elite, conducted in universities, libraries, museums and 
archives, with clear criteria for belonging to the communities 
undertaking it. In the last ten years however, science and business, 
which shared this culture of exclusivity with the humanities, has found 
these boundaries challenged through crowdsourcing, and have flourished 
as a result. This collaborative and interdisciplinary symposium, 
organised jointly by King's College London’s Department of Digital 
Humanities (DDH) and Stanford University’s Center for Spatial and 
Textual Analysis (CESTA), seeks to explore the ways in which humanities 
and cultural heritage research is enriched through scholarly 
crowdsourcing. It brings together the unique perspectives on the subject 
that DDH and CESTA have developed over the past three years, including 
DDH’s Crowd-Sourcing Scoping Study funded by the AHRC, and Stanford’s 
Humanities Crowdsourcing research theme. These activities represent the 
cutting edge of humanities crowdsourcing in both its theory and its 
practice; and the symposium’s main aim is to build a bridge between the 
two. It will include presentations from this emerging field’s leading 
scholars and practitioners. The meeting will explore the arc between the 
inception of humanities crowd-sourcing as a method of data processing 
adopted largely uncritically from big science, to its present instance 
as as means of interrogating fuzzy and disparate humanities research 
data in new ways using ‘non-professional’ engagement and input, and to 
future possibilities involving completely new ways of co-producing 
humanities research across increasingly blurred institutional and 
professional boundaries.

Registration is £20, including lunch on both days and refreshments. Last 
booking date is 31 August 2015.

Event link: 
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/ddh/eventrecords/2015/crowdsourcing.aspx 

Registration link: 
http://estore.kcl.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=17&catid=16&prodid=499 

For further information, contact stuart.dunn at kcl.ac.uk

-- 
---------------------------------
Dr. Stuart Dunn
Lecturer
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London, WC2B 5RL

Email: stuart.dunn at kcl.ac.uk
Tel. +44 (0)20 7848 2709
Fax. +44 (0)20 7848 2980

Blog: http://stuartdunn.wordpress.com



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 16:04:47 +0000
        From: Bethany Nowviskie <bnowviskie at CLIR.ORG>
        Subject: help shape the 2015 DLF Forum!

Help shape the 2015 Digital Library Federation Forum!

The DLF Program Planning Committee received a record number of proposals for our 2015 DLF Forum event, a major conference for digital libraries, data services, library-based digital humanities, and allied fields, which is planned for Vancouver this October—more than double the previous year's total! We now invite your feedback and help.

One week of community voting is now open:

http://www.diglib.org/forums/2015forum/community-voting/

The title and abstract for each Forum proposal is viewable in our review system, and you are invited to assign scores based on your interest in seeing certain presentations join the program. After voting closes, the PPC will use community input to inform its final decisions. (Proposals for this year’s DLF Liberal Arts College Preconference, which also received a very strong response, are being handled separately, as are workshop registrations.)

If you submitted a complete DLF Forum proposal, expect to be notified of status by early August. Presenters will be guaranteed a registration place at the Forum.

Voting closes on July 6, 11:59 PM ET. Anyone may vote: you need not be affiliated with a DLF member institution to express your views. One vote per proposal, per person, please. And we’ll hope to see you in Vancouver!

Bethany Nowviskie
Director of the Digital Library Federation at CLIR
& Research Associate Professor of Digital Humanities at UVa
nowviskie.org<http://nowviskie.org/> | diglib.org<http://diglib.org/> | clir.org<http://clir.org/> | ach.org<http://ach.org/> | engl.virginia.edu<http://engl.virginia.edu/>






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