[Humanist] 29.128 storytelling digitally

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Jun 29 23:35:38 CEST 2015


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 128.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    A V <vaupotic.vsd at gmail.com>                              (56)
        Subject: Re:  29.126 storytelling digitally

  [2]   From:    Joshua Mann <joshleemann at gmail.com>                       (64)
        Subject: Re: 29.126 storytelling digitally

  [3]   From:    René Audet <Rene.Audet at lit.ulaval.ca>                    (90)
        Subject: Re:  29.126 storytelling digitally

  [4]   From:    Andrew Brook <Andrew.Brook at carleton.ca>                    (9)
        Subject: Re:  29.126 storytelling digitally


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 11:58:18 +0200
        From: A V <vaupotic.vsd at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  29.126 storytelling digitally
        In-Reply-To: <20150629013541.F3E84A44 at digitalhumanities.org>


A fascinating new video-essay by Lutz Dammbeck "Overgames" (2015) argues in
the opposite direction - the American army contributed to the creation of
TV shows based on play therapy in order to transform the (West-)German
postwar viewers, but also audiences in USA etc.
http://www.berlinartweek.de/de/programm/berlin-art-week/einzelansicht.html?tx_cal_controller[view]=event&tx_cal_controller[type]=tx_cal_phpicalendar&tx_cal_controller[uid]=1203

On 29 June 2015 at 03:35, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>
>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 126.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>         Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 11:21:37 +1000
>         From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>         Subject: simulation and storytelling
>
>
> Sharon Ghamari-Tabrizi, in "The Convergence of the Pentagon and
> Hollywood" (Memory Bytes: History, Technology, and Digital Culture, ed.
> Rabinovitz and Geil, 2004), describes in some detail the adoption by
> the U.S. military of the entertainment industry's storytelling techniques
> implemented by means of simulation. This chapter follows on from her
> excellent "Simulating the Unthinkable: Gaming Future War in the 1950s
> and 1960s", Social Studies of Science 30.2 (2000). In the 2004 piece
> she describes a U.S. National Research Council workshop in October 1996
> at which representatives from film, video game, entertainment and
> theme-parks came together with those from the Department of
> Defense, academia and the defense industries. There is much about this
> convergence that we might productively take an interest in. Let me,
> however, highlight storytelling in particular.
>
> In a military context, Ghamari-Tabrizi points out, skilled storytelling
> techniques are used to help participants in a VR environment sense that
> they are in a real environment and behave accordingly. Storytelling
> functions as a potent form of emotional cueing that would seem to elicit
> the desired responses. But especially interesting, I think, is the fact
> that "many conference participants argued that the preferred mode of
> experiential immersion in electronic media is not the unframed chaos of
> hypertext, but old-fashioned storytelling." She quotes Alex Seiden of
> Industrial Light and Magic (note the date -- 1996): "I've never
> seen a CD-ROM that moved me the way a powerful film has. I've never
> visited a Web page with great emotional impact. I contend that linear
> narrative is the fundamental art form of humankind: the novel, the play,
> the film... these are the forms that define our cultural experience."
>
> Comments?
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
> Humanities, King's College London, and Digital Humanities Research
> Group, University of Western Sydney



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 14:14:41 +0100
        From: Joshua Mann <joshleemann at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re: 29.126 storytelling digitally
        In-Reply-To: <20150629013541.F3E84A44 at digitalhumanities.org>


In regard to the following idea, "I contend that linear
narrative is the fundamental art form of humankind...":

Too much is claimed here, I think. In a sense, it must be true (in fact, a
truism) that humans, whose experience of the world is one moment after
another, think, act, and indeed, produce and interpret artefacts (and
artworks) linearly, one moment after another. A broad understanding of
narrativity, then, might construe all art forms as narrative, hypertexts
included.

Regards,
Joshua Mann
Research Fellow
CODEC Research Centre
University of Durham
@beJLM



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 13:39:14 +0000
        From: René Audet <Rene.Audet at lit.ulaval.ca>
        Subject: Re:  29.126 storytelling digitally
        In-Reply-To: <20150629013541.F3E84A44 at digitalhumanities.org>


Thanks for this very interesting piece, Willard. Two possible answers come to
my mind. The first is the exact coincidence between narrative and the human
experience (especially the experience of time-see Paul Ricoeur's works). If we
often read that hypertext mimics the human mind's way of connecting information
and building meaning, it does not reflect our own sense of living (time,
action, sequence, consequences). A narrative structures characters, events,
intentionnality in a single text. 

The second proposition is much more political : storytelling is a way to give
(or impose) an answer... Based on its teleological frame (everything is put in
place to support/prepare/announce the end), the narrative is quite reassuring:
here is how we must understand the situation, how we can explain that illogical
behaviour, why this person acts that way. Using storytelling aims to impose a
point of view, a worldview. 

No surprise the Department of Defense used (and certainly uses) storytelling to
train its "participants"... 

Ren? Audet


______________________________________________________________
René Audet
Professeur titulaire, Département des littératures, Université Laval (Québec)
Directeur, Centre de recherche interuniversitaire sur la littérature et la
culture québécoises (CRILCQ), site Université Laval

mail  rene.audet at lit.ulaval.ca
web  http://www.crilcq.org
bur   Pavillon Charles-De Koninck, bureau 7173
tél    418 656 2131, poste 2459



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 09:45:13 -0400
        From: Andrew Brook <Andrew.Brook at carleton.ca>
        Subject: Re:  29.126 storytelling digitally
        In-Reply-To: <20150629013541.F3E84A44 at digitalhumanities.org>

One indication of the importance of narrative to us: Which would you 
rather settle down with in the evening, a good novel or a piece of 
cognitive theory?

Andrew

-- 
Andrew Brook, D. Phil., Chancellor's Professor of Philosophy and 
Cognitive Science Emeritus, Past-president, Canadian Psychoanalytic 
Society, 3A57 Paterson Hall, Carleton University, Ottawa K1S5B6, Ph: 613 
520 3597





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