[Humanist] 29.136 a map of metaphor

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Jul 4 10:29:48 CEST 2015


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 136.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Amir Simantov <wawina at gmail.com>                         (104)
        Subject: Re:  29.133 pubs: a map of metaphor

  [2]   From:    Amir Simantov <wawina at gmail.com>                         (117)
        Subject: Re:  29.133 pubs: a map of metaphor

[NB: Before you draw any conclusions or let loose any reactions to the first
message please read the second. How important usage is to meaning! 
--WM]


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 08:25:56 -0500
        From: Amir Simantov <wawina at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  29.133 pubs: a map of metaphor
        In-Reply-To: <20150630202139.6F1F72DDF at digitalhumanities.org>


A megalomaniac piece of art.

On 30 June 2015 at 15:21, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 29, No. 133.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>         Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:28:08 +0000
>         From: Brian Aitken <Brian.Aitken at glasgow.ac.uk>
>         Subject: Online Metaphor Map launched
>
>
> Hi
>
> Here at the University of Glasgow we have just completed a three-year-long
> project which traces metaphor over the entire history of the English
> language, creating the first ever Metaphor Map resource.  It contains
> thousands of metaphorical connections which can be accessed through a
> visual or text-based interface.
>
> If you're interested you can visit the site here:
>
> http://www.glasgow.ac.uk/metaphor
>
> Or you can read more below:
>
> ----
>
> English language metaphors are “as old as the hills” – or 13 centuries old
> at the very least – researchers at the School of Critical Studies at the
> University of Glasgow have found.
>
> They have just completed a three-year-long project which traces metaphor
> over the entire history of the English language, creating the first ever
> Metaphor Map resource which contains the thousands of metaphorical
> connections that the researchers have identified.
>
> “This project is unique in its scope. While a considerable amount of work
> on metaphor has been done over the past 40 years, it has never been
> possible to achieve this level of comprehensiveness until now,” said Dr
> Wendy Anderson, Principal Investigator on the “Mapping Metaphor with the
> Historical Thesaurus” project.‌‌
>
> The Metaphor Map is based on the data contained in the Historical
> Thesaurus of English, which took from 1966-2009 to compile, and its own
> parent resource, the Oxford English Dictionary. The researchers, who have
> been funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), have been
> able to identify well over 10,000 metaphorical connections between
> different categories and track how language use has changed over the
> centuries.
>
> “These findings support the view that metaphor is pervasive in language
> and a major mechanism of meaning-change,” said Dr Anderson.
>
> “This helps us to see how our language shapes our understanding – the
> connections we make between different areas of meaning in English show, to
> some extent, how we mentally structure our world,” she added.
>
> “Over the past 30 years, it has become clear that metaphor is not simply a
> literary phenomenon; metaphorical thinking underlies the way we make sense
> of the world conceptually. When we talk about ‘a healthy economy’ or ‘a
> clear argument’ we are using expressions that imply the mapping of one
> domain of experience (e.g. medicine, sight) onto another (e.g. finance,
> perception).
>
> “When we describe an argument in terms of warfare or destruction (‘he
> demolished my case’), we may be saying something about the society we live
> in. The study of metaphor is therefore of vital interest to scholars in
> many fields, including linguists and psychologists, as well as to scholars
> of literature.”
>
> The Metaphor Map is still a work in progress, but once complete it will
> also include tens of thousands of examples of words with metaphorical
> senses; to date, around a quarter of these have been put online.
>
> The researchers plan to launch a parallel Metaphor Map for data from Old
> English (prior to 1150AD) in August, at the International Society of Anglo
> Saxonists conference in Glasgow. The team, led by Dr Anderson and Research
> Associate Dr Ellen Bramwell, is also working on another project, “Metaphor
> in the Curriculum”, to create materials on metaphor for schools. This is
> funded by the AHRC’s Follow-on Funding for Impact and Engagement strand.
>
> ----
>
> Kind regards
>
> Brian
>
> -----
> Brian Aitken MA(Hons) MSc
> Digital Humanities Research Officer
> School of Critical Studies
> Room 506
> 13 University Gardens
> University of Glasgow
> G12 8QJ
>
> Email: brian.aitken at glasgow.ac.uk
> Tel: +44 (0)141 330 3392
> Web: http://blogs.arts.gla.ac.uk/digital-humanities/




--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 17:24:35 -0500
        From: Amir Simantov <wawina at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  29.133 pubs: a map of metaphor


*IMPORTANT CLARIFICATION*

I was using the word "megalomaniac" as to say something extremely *positive*
and not negative! Thanks Willard to open my eyes, I was not, in any case,
wanted to say that it is bad... I have shared it in my Facebook and
Pinterest and emailed to friends and talked about it to a client - I was
amazed by the size and the scope of the project (literally all English
written ever) so I was using this word, but I meant good! If anyone was
offended by my language glitch please forgive me - I meant the opposite as
it, I understand now, sound.

Amir



More information about the Humanist mailing list