[Humanist] 28.773 events: the book; news storylines; history of DH; seminars at Galway

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Feb 27 08:38:44 CET 2015


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 773.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Bradley, John" <john.bradley at kcl.ac.uk>                  (22)
        Subject: DDH/KCL Seminar: Tuesday, 3 March, 6.15 ATM: Julianne Nyhan:
                Were Humanists and Digital Humanities always so very
                different

  [2]   From:    Elli Bleeker <elli.bleeker at gmail.com>                     (36)
        Subject: Lecture "The Future of the Book and the Books of the
                Future", 9 March 2015, University of Antwerp (Belgium)

  [3]   From:    Tommaso Caselli <t.caselli at gmail.com>                     (61)
        Subject: 2nd Call for papers: Computing News Storylines 2015 at ACL-
                IJCNLP 2015

  [4]   From:    Justin Tonra <justin.tonra at NUIGALWAY.IE>                  (15)
        Subject: Digital Scholarship Seminar @ NUI Galway


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:32:00 +0000
        From: "Bradley, John" <john.bradley at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: DDH/KCL Seminar: Tuesday, 3 March, 6.15 ATM: Julianne Nyhan: Were Humanists and Digital Humanities always so very different


The Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London, invites all to its next public seminar:

Were Humanists and Digital Humanities always so very different? An investigation of the earliest contributions to Humanist

Julianne Nyhan (Department of Information Studies, University College London)

When: 3rd March (Tuesday): 18:15 start
Where: Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor
(http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf)
King's College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS

We'd be glad to see you.                    ... John Bradley and Gabriel Bodard

-------------------------------------------------------------------
Were Humanists and Digital Humanities always so very different? An investigation of the earliest contributions to Humanist

Julianne Nyhan
(Department of Information Studies, University College London)

Until recently the history of Digital Humanities has, with a few notable exceptions (see, for example, relevant entries in the bibliography that I'm in the process of compiling here: https://hiddenhistories.omeka.net/resources) mostly been neglected by the DH community as well as by the mainstream Humanities. Of the many research questions that wait to be addressed, one set pertains to the history of the disciplinary formation of Digital Humanities. What processes, attitudes and circumstances (not to mention knowledge and expertise) conspired, and in what ways, to make it possible for DH to become disciplined in the ways that it has (and not in other ways)? What might answers to such questions contribute to new conversations about the forms that DH might take in the future? Here I will make a first and brief contribution to answering such far-reaching questions by identifying and analysing references to disciplinary identity that occur in conversations conducted via the Humanist Listserv in its inaugural year.

About Dr Nyhan:

Dr Julianne Nyhan is lecturer in Digital Information Studies in the Department of Information Studies, University College London. Her research interests include the history of computing in the Humanities, Oral history and most aspects of digital humanities. Her recent publications include the co-edited Digital Humanities in Practice (Facet 2012) and Digital Humanities: a Reader (Ashgate 2013). She is at work on a book (Springer Verlag 2015) on the history of Digital Humanities (information about the wider Hidden Histories project is here https://hiddenhistories.omeka.net/). Having recently completed a number of interviews with the female keypunch operators who were trained by Roberto Busa in the 1950s and 1960s to work on the Index Thomisticus project she is also at work on a paper about this (see http://archelogos.hypotheses.org/135)  Among other things, she is a member of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Peer Review College, the communications Editor of Interdisciplinary Science Reviews and a member of various other editorial and advisory boards. She tweets @juliannenyhan and blogs at http://archelogos.hypotheses.org/. Further information is available here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/dis/people/juliannenyhan

-----------------------------------------------------------------
John Bradley
Senior Lecturer
Department of the Digital Humanities
Faculty of Arts and Humanities
King's College London
+44 (0)20 7848 2680


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:12:45 +0100
        From: Elli Bleeker <elli.bleeker at gmail.com>
        Subject: Lecture "The Future of the Book and the Books of the Future", 9 March 2015, University of Antwerp (Belgium)


Dear list,

On March 9th at 16:00h, Barbara Bordalejo gives a guest lecture entitled
"The Future of the Book and the Books of the Future". Barbara Bordalejo will
talk about issues relating to publishing, eReaders and multimedia books.
This will be the second lecture of a series on Digital Humanities, organised
by the Platform Digital Humanities of the University of Antwerp. The
lectures are in English and free to attend, however, registration is
required. The lecture takes place in room R.213 at the city campus of the
University of Antwerp (Belgium).

About the Speaker

Barbara Bordalejo is a textual critic, editor and digital humanist. She
studied Literature and Linguistics in Venezuela. In 2003, she completed two
PhDs, one in English and American Literature (New York University) and one
in Middle English Literature (De Montfort University). Since then, she has
worked in four universities in two continents and in October she joined KU
Leuven's Literary Studies as the Digital Humanities specialist. She is
currently involved in the CantApp, an edition of the Canterbury Tales for
mobile devices.

About the Series

This lecture is part of a series on Digital Humanities, organised by the
Platform Digital Humanities of the University of Antwerp. The objective of
the series is to sketch the evolving landscape of digital humanities. Once
merely a buzzword, Œdigital humanities¹ is now developing into a legitimate
discipline that is constantly expanding and hard to define. In short, it is
described as the use of computational methods and digital tools for research
in Arts, Humanities, Cultural Heritage, and Social Science. The diversity of
the field is perhaps best illustrated through concrete examples from
practitioners. For that reason, the Platform Digital Humanities invites
speakers from a variety of disciplines, all undertaking/united by
exceptional and interesting research projects.

Please confirm your attendance by e-mail to elli.bleeker at uantwerpen.be
<mailto:elli.bleeker at uantwerpen.be>

 

Kind regards,

Platform Digital Humanities
http://dighum.uantwerpen.be  http://dighum.uantwerpen.be/



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 17:04:10 +0100
        From: Tommaso Caselli <t.caselli at gmail.com>
        Subject: 2nd Call for papers: Computing News Storylines 2015 at ACL-IJCNLP 2015


                                2nd Call for Papers
   Computing News Storylines 2015 (NewsStory 2015)

 Workshop in conjunction with ACL-IJCNLP 2015, Beijing, China

   More info: https://sites.google.com/site/computingnewsstorylines2015/home
********************************************************************************

[Apologies for multiple posting]

Submission website:  https://www.softconf.com/acl2015/CNewS/

===============
Important Dates
===============
14 May 2015: Submission deadline for Short and Long Papers
4 June 2015: Notification of Acceptance
21 June 2015: Camera-ready papers due
31 July 2015: Workshop

===============
Scope and Topics
===============
The First Worskop on Computing News Storylines (CNewS 2015) aims at
bringing together researchers and scientists working on narrative
extraction and representation from news within Computational Linguistics
and Artificial Intelligence. Narratives are at the heart of information
sharing. Ever since people began to share their experiences, they have
connected them to form narratives. Modern day news reports still reflect
this narrative structure, but they have proven difficult for automatic
tools to summarise, structure, or connect to other reports. Most text
processing tools focus on extracting relatively simple structures from the
local lexical environment, and concentrate on the document as a unit or on
even smaller units such as sentences or phrases, rather than cross-document
connections especially published over longer periods of time. However,
current information needs demand a move towards multidimensional and
distributed representations which take into account the connections between
all relevant elements involved in a “story”. The workshop aims at assessing
the state-of-the-art in event extraction and linking, as well as detecting
and ranking narratives according to salience. The workshop invites work on
all aspects of generating narrative structures or components thereof from
news. This includes topics such as (but not limited to):

- detecting events from news
- linguistic expression of relevant events
- filtering relevant events
- cumulation of information from news streams
- detecting opinions and perspectives
- finding trending or serendipitous stories in news
- tracing perspective change through time
- modeling plot structures
- storyline stability and completeness
- annotating storylines
- temporal or causal ordering of events
- linguistics resources for storylines
- big data as a source for storylines
- evaluation of storylines
- discourse structure and storylines
- visualisation of storylines
- detecting facts and speculations
- dynamic event modeling

[...]

-- 

Tommaso Caselli
Computational Lexicology & Terminology Lab (CLTL)Vrije Universiteit
Amsterdam
De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam
http://www.understandinglanguagebymachines.org



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 11:36:47 +0000
        From: Justin Tonra <justin.tonra at NUIGALWAY.IE>
        Subject: Digital Scholarship Seminar @ NUI Galway



Announcing the schedule for the Spring 2015 series of Digital Scholarship Seminar at NUI Galway. [See the attachment below for details.]

The series begins on Tuesday 3 March, and features local and visiting speakers presenting papers on topics such as databases, metadata, gaming, prosopography, scholarly editing, and poetic diction—touching on material from antiquity to the twenty-first century—each with a particular digital focus. See the attached poster for further details. All are welcome: please join us for digital scholarship and discussion this semester! 

Connect with DSS: 
Website http://www.nuigalway.ie/digital-seminar/  | 
Facebook<https://www.facebook.com/nuigdss> | 
Mailing list<mailto:nuig-dss+subscribe at googlegroups.com> 

-- 
Dr Justin Tonra, 
University Fellow in English, 
School of Humanities, 
National University of Ireland, Galway.


*** Attachments:
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1424989321_2015-02-26_justin.tonra@nuigalway.ie_22777.2.pdf




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