[Humanist] 28.718 events: textual scholarship and literary studies

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Feb 10 07:43:41 CET 2015


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 718.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "totosy de zepetnek, steven" <clcweb at purdue.edu>           (6)
        Subject: Call for abstracts re ICLA/AILC University of Vienna 2016

  [2]   From:    "Stilgoe, Jack" <j.stilgoe at UCL.AC.UK>                      (7)
        Subject: UCL STS seminar on Wednesday

  [3]   From:    Anna Kazantseva <anna at anna-kazantseva.com>                (15)
        Subject: Fourth Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Literature
                -- Call for Papers Number Three and Last

  [4]   From:    Gabriel Egan <mail at GABRIELEGAN.COM>                       (44)
        Subject: Call for Papers: "Users of Scholarly Editions"


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2015 18:40:32 -0500
        From: "totosy de zepetnek, steven" <clcweb at purdue.edu>
        Subject: Call for abstracts re ICLA/AILC University of Vienna 2016
        In-Reply-To: <20150206062125.41FE9803 at digitalhumanities.org>


Call for abstracts: 

Panel "Digital Humanities in Comparative Literature, World Literature(s), and Comparative Cultural Studies" (org. Steven Totosy de Zepetnek, Purdue University & Graciela Boruszko, Pepperdine University) at the 21st Congress of the International Comparative Literature Association / Association Internationale de Litterature Comparee http://icla2016.univie.ac.at , University of Vienna 21-27 July 2016. 

Participants in the panel(s) discuss aspects of digital humanities from various perspectives within the discipline of comparative literature and the fields of world literature(s) and comparative cultural studies. 

Owing to the current situation worldwide when fewer students are interested in the study of literature, digital humanities has promise for the social relevance of the humanities in research (e.g., data science, libraries), practice (e.g., digital publishing of journals and books), pedagogy (e.g., online and blended teaching), and matters technical. 

Please submit abstracts for presentation by 31 March 2015 on any aspect of digital humanities with regard to the relevance, uses, impact, etc., of digital humanities in the study of literature and culture to Steven Totosy de Zepetnek at totosysteven at purdue.edu & Graciela Boruszko at graciela.boruszko at pepperdine.edu. 

Following the submission of abstracts by the panel organizers, abstracts are evaluated by the ICLA/AILC and participants whose abstracts are accepted are notified by the Congress organizers.


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015 11:32:12 +0000
        From: "Stilgoe, Jack" <j.stilgoe at UCL.AC.UK>
        Subject: UCL STS seminar on Wednesday
        In-Reply-To: <20150206062125.41FE9803 at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear all,

We're looking forward to seeing you at the next UCL STS Seminar on Wednesday 11th Feb. Professor Judy Wajcman will be joining us to discuss themes from her new book, Pressed for Time: The acceleration of life in digital capitalism. The seminar will take place in Darwin B15, starting at 4:30, with tea and coffee available from 4pm.

Best

Jack

About the book...

The technologically tethered, iPhone-addicted figure is an image we can easily conjure. Most of us complain that there aren't enough hours in the day and there are too many e-mails in our thumb-accessible inboxes. This widespread perception that life is faster than it used to be is now ingrained in our culture, and smartphones and the Internet are continually being blamed. But isn't the sole purpose of the smartphone to give us such quick access to people and information that we'll be free to do other things? Isn't technology supposed to make our lives easier?

In Pressed for Time, Judy Wajcman explains why we immediately interpret our experiences with digital technology as inexorably accelerating everyday life. She argues that we are not mere hostages to communication devices, and the sense of always being rushed is the result of the priorities and parameters we ourselves set rather than the machines that help us set them. Indeed, being busy and having action-packed lives has become valorized by our productivity-driven culture. Wajcman offers a bracing historical perspective, exploring the commodification of clock time, and how the speed of the industrial age became identified with progress. She also delves into the ways time use differs for diverse groups in modern societies, showing how changes in work patterns, family arrangements, and parenting all affect time stress. Bringing together empirical research on time use and theoretical debates about dramatic digital developments, this accessible and engaging book will leave readers better versed in how to use technology to navigate life's fast lane.?



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015 09:20:59 -0500
        From: Anna Kazantseva <anna at anna-kazantseva.com>
        Subject: Fourth Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Literature -- Call for Papers Number Three and Last
        In-Reply-To: <20150206062125.41FE9803 at digitalhumanities.org>

Final Call for Papers

Fourth Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Literature
June 4, 2015
co-located with 
2015 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics – Human Language Technologies (NAACL HLT 2015)
Boulder, Colorado, USA

Literature is special, so the analysis of literary texts must be, too. A great venue for such special papers (-:) is the Fourth Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Literature, co-located with NAACL HLT 2015. It will take place in Denver on June 4th. Papers are due by March 4th.

Practically everything we can tell you about the workshop appears on its Web site. Go directly to https://sites.google.com/site/clfl2015/call-for-papers for a list of exciting topics of interest; if your favourite literature-related NLP activity is not there, tell us, and we will add it pronto.

The workshop will feature two excellent invited speakers: Nick Montfort (http://nickm.com/) and Matthew Jockers (http://www.matthewjockers.net/).

Just to tell you what to expect, here are some of the topics from the past workshops: stylistic segmentation of poetry; style, sentiment and imagery in contemporary poetry; social network analysis of "Alice in Wonderland"; learning to extract quotable phrases; recognition of classical Arabic poems; a syntactic investigation of chick lit and literature; clustering voices in "The Waste Land"; parsing screenplays for extracting social networks from movies; structure-based clustering of novels; generating music from literature.

Anna, Anna, Stan & Corina
clfl2015 at googlegroups.com
https://sites.google.com/site/clfl2015/

PS. Let us study literary data before they disappear in the onslaught of piracy and lack of funding for the arts.

= = = =


--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015 18:00:07 +0000
        From: Gabriel Egan <mail at GABRIELEGAN.COM>
        Subject: Call for Papers: "Users of Scholarly Editions"
        In-Reply-To: <LISTSERV%201404081732031340.AC79 at JISCMAIL.AC.UK>

"Users of Scholarly Editions: Editorial Anticipations of
Reading, Studying and Consulting"
	
The 12th Annual Conference of the European Society for
Textual Scholarship (ESTS) will be held at the Centre
for Textual Studies, De Montfort University, Leicester
England 19-21 November 2015

The ESTS returns to Leicester where it was founded in 2001
to stage a major collective investigation into the state
and future of scholarly editing. Our focus is the needs
of users of scholarly editions and proposals for 20 minute
papers are invited on topics such as:

* Are users' needs changing?
* How does edition design shape use?
* Stability in print and digital
* Where are we in the study of mise en page?
* Facsimiles and scholarly editions
* Collaborative and social editing
* Editorial specialization in the digital age
* APIs and mashups versus anticipation
* The logic of annotation
* Is zero the best price point for editions?
* Readers versus users
* Can we assume a general reader'?
* Indexing and annotation versus search
* Editors, publishers and Open Access
* Is technology changing editing?
* Digital editions or digital archives?
* Are editions ever obsolete?
* Scholarly editions versus popular editions
* Any other topic related to the use or users of scholarly editions

Plenary Speaker (subject to confirmation) include:

Hans Walter Gabler (Munich University)
David Greetham (City University of New York)
Tim William Machan (Notre Dame University)
Gary Taylor (Florida State University)
Elaine Treharne (Stanford University)
Andrew Prescott (Glasgow University)

Hands-on workshops will be given on setting movable type,
letterpress printing, and getting started with XML.

Proposals for papers should be emailed to Prof Gabriel
Egan <gegan at dmu.ac.uk>

See http://cts.dmu.ac.uk/ESTS for information and registration






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