[Humanist] 28.717 small scale / low key projects

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sun Feb 8 09:40:21 CET 2015


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 717.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Daniel O'Donnell <daniel.odonnell at uleth.ca>              (126)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 28.714 small scale / low key projects

  [2]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (25)
        Subject: smallest scale, lowest key


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2015 22:42:08 -0700
        From: Daniel O'Donnell <daniel.odonnell at uleth.ca>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 28.714 small scale / low key projects
        In-Reply-To: <20150207081705.6081B9FD at digitalhumanities.org>


There's also the "Minimal Computing" Working group at GO::DH which has 
been asking this kind of question in a Global Context (i.e. having to do 
with differential infrastructure and access to processing power. John 
Simpson and Jentery Sayers are the two leads on that.

On 15-02-07 01:17 AM, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 714.
>              Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>          Date: Fri, 6 Feb 2015 11:22:45 -0800
>          From: Quinn Dombrowski <quinnd at berkeley.edu>
>          Subject: Re:  28.708 small scale / low key projects
>          In-Reply-To: <20150206062125.41FE9803 at digitalhumanities.org>
>
>
> Many of the projects I've worked on have been done without much, or any,
> grant funding. I'm currently working on writing a book, tentatively titled
> "Drupal for Humanists", that provides a step-by-step guide to how to build
> a web-based environment for such projects (or even larger / more complex /
> better funded projects), with no custom programming required. Hosting a
> Drupal site can be done very inexpensively as well, and I hope that it'll
> be useful for people in a wide range of contexts, including "DH DIY-ers".
>
> ~Quinn
>
> On Thu, Feb 5, 2015 at 10:21 PM, Humanist Discussion Group <
> willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:
>
>>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 708.
>>              Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>>
>>    [1]   From:    John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>
>>   (26)
>>          Subject: Re:  28.701 small scale / low key projects?
>>
>>    [2]   From:    Brian Sarnacki <bsarnacki at gmail.com>
>>    (62)
>>          Subject: Re:  28.701 small scale / low key projects?
>>
>>
>>
>> --[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>          Date: Thu, 05 Feb 2015 12:56:53 +0100
>>          From: John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>
>>          Subject: Re:  28.701 small scale / low key projects?
>>          In-Reply-To: <20150205062031.92B1E965 at digitalhumanities.org>
>>
>> On 05/02/2015 07:20, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>>
>>> I'm personally very interested in the small scale and/or low key DH
>>> projects. One idea I'd like to explore at some point is how to create a
>>> DIY digital humanities methodology, where anyone can get involved.
>>> Anyway, do tell me what you think...
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>>
>>> - Alexander
>>>
>> The DIY DH thing may not grab the headlines, but has been around for a
>> while:
>>
>> DIY DH from 2011:
>>
>> http://www.trevorowens.org/2011/07/the-digital-humanities-as-the-diy-humanities/
>> Punk Archaeology from 2014:
>>
>> https://mediterraneanworld.wordpress.com/2014/07/28/punk-archaeology-digital-humanities-and-diy/
>>
>> I think a major question here is differentiating between academics'
>> production, which can be considered part of the job, and DH outside the
>> academy or any other institution, 'hobbyist' if you like, but without
>> any pejorative sense.
>>
>> John
>>
>> --
>> John Levin
>> http://www.anterotesis.com
>> http://twitter.com/anterotesis
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>          Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2015 18:10:18 -0600
>>          From: Brian Sarnacki <bsarnacki at gmail.com>
>>          Subject: Re:  28.701 small scale / low key projects?
>>          In-Reply-To: <20150205062031.92B1E965 at digitalhumanities.org>
>>
>>
>> Hi All,
>>
>> I think one good source of small scale digital projects is graduate
>> students. I am creating small DH projects to go along with my dissertation,
>> one of which can be found here:
>> http://www.briansarnacki.com/smallcity/furniture-city/
>>
>> Jason Heppler has an ongoing dissertation project here:
>> http://dissertation.jasonheppler.org/ and I'm sure there are many others
>> creating similar work.
>>
>> Best,
>> Brian
>>
>>
>> --
>> Brian Sarnacki
>> Ph.D. Candidate
>> Department of History
>> University of Nebraska-Lincoln
>> bsarnacki at gmail.com
>> http://www.briansarnacki.com/


-- 
 From my Ubuntu notebook

Daniel Paul O'Donnell
Professor of English
University of Lethbridge
Lethbridge AB T1K 3M4
Canada

+1 403 393-2539



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 08 Feb 2015 08:11:48 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: smallest scale, lowest key
        In-Reply-To: <20150207081705.6081B9FD at digitalhumanities.org>

Perhaps I have related this story before. If so, please excuse the 
repetition.

In 1987 I sat in on a seminar led by R. Narasimhan (1926-2007), known in 
India as the Bhisma of Computer Science and Technology, who was brought 
to the International Semiotics Institute in Toronto by Paul Bouissac. At 
the time he was more or less unknown in Canada. Bouissac had met him in 
India and was so impressed he arranged somehow to fund his trip to 
Toronto and his stay there. During this week-long seminar we sat in a room 
with a table, chairs and chalkboard. Narasimhan drew conceptual 
diagrams as we gradually picked apart what a machine would have to know 
to learn as a child. No keyboards, no screens, no processing power at 
all. It was exhilirating.

Of course one needs physical machines for computer science. (Read 
Richard Hamming's Turing Award lecture on the subject.) But it is 
possible to do exciting work with the power of the mind -- in this case 
backed by a *very* powerful mind disciplined in the Indian intellectual 
tradition. It seems to me that we think all too little about algorithmic 
reasoning in the context of the humanities.

Comments?

Yours,
WM
-- 
Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
Humanities, King's College London, and Digital Humanities Research
Group, University of Western Sydney




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