[Humanist] 28.333 pubs: Loudness in the Novel (Stanford LitLab)

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Sep 16 07:06:48 CEST 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 333.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:20:18 +0000
        From: Stanford Literary Lab <literarylab at stanford.edu>
        Subject: Stanford Literary Lab, Pamphlet 7. Holst Katsma, "Loudness in the Novel"


*** Attachments:
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1410811921_2014-09-15_literarylab@stanford.edu_9585.2.pdf

Perhaps it was Holst Katsma’s musical education that prompted him to see loudness as a promising object for literary analysis; what is certain is that “Loudness in the Novel” takes what might have remained just a good intuition, and turns it into a strikingly effective tool for narrative theory and historical analysis. One need only look at the “score” of Book I of The Idiot, or the chart on the triumph of “said” in the nineteenth century, to realize the pamphlet's intuitive force and intellectual elegance.
“Loudness in the Novel” was conceived by Holst Katsma in 2012, when he was a junior; in 2013, a longer version won the Kennedy prize (Stanford’s highest recognition for undergraduate work in the humanities). It is a great example of what digital and quantitative research has to offer to undergraduate education.
 
All pamphlets of the Literary Lab can be downloaded at: http://litlab.stanford.edu/?page_id=255

1. “Quantitative Formalism: an Experiment”
Sarah Allison, Ryan Heuser, Matthew Jockers, Franco Moretti, Michael Witmore
 
2. “Network Theory, Plot Analysis”
Franco Moretti
 
3. “Becoming Yourself: The Afterlife of Reception”
Ed Finn
 
4. “A Quantitative Literary History
of 2,958 Nineteenth-Century British Novels: The Semantic Cohort Method”
Ryan Heuser, Long Le-Khac
 
5. “Style at the Scale of the Sentence”
Sarah Allison, Marissa Gemma, Ryan Heuser, Franco Moretti, Amir Tevel, Irena Yamboliev
 
6. “ ‘Operationalizing’: or, the Function of Measurement in Modern Literary Theory”
Franco Moretti

*** Attachments:
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1410811921_2014-09-15_literarylab@stanford.edu_9585.2.pdf



More information about the Humanist mailing list