[Humanist] 28.422 copyright regulations? incidental digital humanities?

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Oct 21 07:20:18 CEST 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 422.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (25)
        Subject: incidental to the main show?

  [2]   From:    Andrew Prescott <Andrew.Prescott at glasgow.ac.uk>           (14)
        Subject: Copyright


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 14:18:27 +0100
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: incidental to the main show?


David G. Hays, then of the RAND Corporation, gave a paper at the 1962 
conference, The Use of Computers in Archaeology, at Bad Wartenstein, 
"Simulation: An Introduction for Anthropologists". (The papers were later 
gathered into a volume of the same name, ed. Dell Hymes, published in 
1965.) In the introduction to his paper, Hays says the following:

> Simulation is a complex kind of research activity - "laboratory
> research on the grand scale" - in which the computer plays an
> incidental, small part, but a part that is essential, in that the
> research would be impossible without it. This sort of research could
> no more have been done before the computer was available than could
> factor analysis with matrices of the order of two hundred, yet
> simulation is not just an application of the computer. One wonders
> whether there will not be many projects of such a sort, projects in
> which the computer makes the work possible, but is almost incidental
> in terms of its role in the research. And one wonders whether or not
> some of these uses may not turn out to be more important than the
> direct applications of the computer that are most talked about.

What about research in the humanities now? Does Hays description fit 
digital humanities?

Yours,
WM
-- 
Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
Humanities, King's College London, and Digital Humanities Research
Group, University of Western Sydney


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 14:14:46 +0000
        From: Andrew Prescott <Andrew.Prescott at glasgow.ac.uk>
        Subject: Copyright


Dear all,

The appended notice was sent to the archives list, FARMER. The issue of copyright is of course also fundamental to digitisation and the development of digital methods - for example, one of the reasons why digital cameras cannot be used in the British Library is for fear of inadvertent breaches of copyright. UK Members of Humanist may therefore wish to add their voice to the campaign to ensure that regulations are introduced in the UK before the next general election.

Andrew

Andrew Prescott FRHistS
Professor of Digital Humanities
University of Glasgow
AHRC Leadership Fellow for Digital Humanities

andrew.prescott at glasgow.ac.uk<mailto:andrew.prescott at glasgow.ac.uk>
@ajprescott
07743895209

Begin forwarded message:

Resent-From: <andrew.prescott at KCL.AC.UK<mailto:andrew.prescott at KCL.AC.UK>>
Date: 20 October 2014 6:32:08 am GMT-4
Reply-To: Caroline Brown <c.z.brown at DUNDEE.AC.UK<mailto:c.z.brown at DUNDEE.AC.UK>>
From: Caroline Brown <c.z.brown at DUNDEE.AC.UK<mailto:c.z.brown at DUNDEE.AC.UK>>



More information about the Humanist mailing list