[Humanist] 28.500 a global perspective

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Nov 20 07:26:00 CET 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 500.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 18:30:46 +0100
        From: Domenico Fiormonte <domenico.fiormonte at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  28.492 a global perspective
        In-Reply-To: <20141115070247.2123082DC at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear all,

as I wrote in the abstract, my article (which is, BTW, part of a larger project) it was just an attempt to review "the geo-linguistic landscape of DH, its current trends and hegemonic forces, and describe the most relevant national and local initiatives, research centers, and teaching experiences."

That's all (?).

My aim was not "to gain a view [broad or narrow] of the entire world", but to offer a taste of what's going on in the world in the field of DH --  to the best of my knowledge and as honestly as I could. I don't know of other similar attempts, so if this will result in other and more inclusive (?), accurate (?) and non-Western (?) descriptions/maps/ etc. I will be the first one to enjoy them.

In fact, last year Amelia Sanz and I proposed to DH2014 a panel on "global" DH where five different regions of the world were represented. The proposal unfortunately was rejected. But we'll try again.

I'm grateful to everybody for the (public and private) comments!

Domenico
P.S. And by the way, as Freud would say, "sometimes my cigar is just a cigar": so "my title is a just a title", not a geopolitical statement...

2014-11-15 8:02 GMT+01:00 Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>:

>
>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 492.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>   [1]   From:    "Bod, Rens" <L.W.M.Bod at uva.nl>
>  (120)
>         Subject: RE:  28.489 pubs: Digital Literary Studies; Bizet
> Catalogue;
>                 a global perspective
>
>   [2]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>   (27)
>         Subject: global perspective?
>
>
>
> --[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 10:41:37 +0000
>         From: "Bod, Rens" <L.W.M.Bod at uva.nl>
>         Subject: RE:  28.489 pubs: Digital Literary Studies; Bizet
> Catalogue;   a global perspective
>         In-Reply-To: <20141114063907.770E48BBA at digitalhumanities.org>
>
> Dear Leonardo Pica Ciamarra,
>
> Hmm, the title seems misleading: the article is not about digital
> humanities from a *global* perspective but from a *western* perspective.
>
> Best,
> Rens Bod
> ________________________________________
> Van: humanist-bounces at lists.digitalhumanities.org [
> humanist-bounces at lists.digitalhumanities.org] namens Humanist Discussion
> Group [willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk]
> Verzonden: vrijdag 14 november 2014 7:39
> Aan: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> Onderwerp: [Humanist] 28.489 pubs: Digital Literary Studies; Bizet
> Catalogue;   a global perspective
>
>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 489.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
> [...]
>         Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 09:56:01 +0100
>         From: Leonardo Pica Ciamarra <PicaCiamarra at ispf.cnr.it>
>         Subject: "Digital Humanities from a global perspective"
>
> Dear Humanist members,
>
> Our e-journal "Laboratorio dell'ISPF" has just published the article by
> Domenico Fiormonte, "Digital Humanities from a global perspective",
> which could be of some interest for this list:
> http://www.ispf-lab.cnr.it/article/2014_203_Abstract.
>
> Regards,
> Leonardo Pica Ciamarra
>
> --
> Leonardo Pica Ciamarra
> Senior Researcher, Head of the Center for Digital Humanites
> Istitute for the History of Philosophical and Scientific Thought
> National Research Council
> via Porta di Massa, 1 - 80133 Napoli I
> email: picaciamarra at ispf.cnr.it
>
> Centro di umanistica digitale: http://www.ispf.cnr.it/UmanisticaDigitale
> Portale Vico: http://www.giambattistavico.it/en
> Laboratorio dell'ISPF: http://www.ispf-lab.cnr.it
>
>
>
>
> --[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 06:53:10 +0000
>         From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>         Subject: global perspective?
>         In-Reply-To: <20141114063907.770E48BBA at digitalhumanities.org>
>
> In response to the welcome news of Domenico Fiormonte's article "Digital
> Humanities from a global perspective", I wonder about what results from
> the undoubtedly laudable intention to gain a view of the entire world.
>
> Allow me to go out onto a possibly weak analogical limb. In a very
> different context Paul N. Edwards, in "The World in a Machine: Origins
> and Impacts of Early Computerized Global Systems Models" (Systems,
> Experts, and Computers: The Systems Approach in Management and
> Engineering, ed. Hughes and Hughes), asks,
>
> > How did 'the world' become a system? What kind of science made it
> > possible to know the planet as a unit, to disentangle the vast array
> > of interlocking forces that determine its characteristics as a
> > system?  (p. 221)
>
> What he shows for climatology is that, "As the grid scales of weather
> models and their time-steps began to shrink, as meteorologists sought to
> model the entire globe" the lack of uniform and so reliable data became
> the problem. Thus the computer "now also became a tool for refining,
> correcting, and shaping data to fit the models' needs" (p. 229).  In
> other words, the attempt to extend knowledge beyond ordinary terrestrial
> experience resulted in the model becoming the nature being modelled.
>
> So I wonder further: can we get further than saying in effect, "This is
> what the world looks like from where I stand"?
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
> Humanities, King's College London, and Digital Humanities Research
> Group, University of Western Sydney





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