[Humanist] 28.492 a global perspective

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Nov 15 08:02:46 CET 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 492.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Bod, Rens" <L.W.M.Bod at uva.nl>                           (120)
        Subject: RE:  28.489 pubs: Digital Literary Studies; Bizet Catalogue;
                a global perspective

  [2]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (27)
        Subject: global perspective?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 10:41:37 +0000
        From: "Bod, Rens" <L.W.M.Bod at uva.nl>
        Subject: RE:  28.489 pubs: Digital Literary Studies; Bizet Catalogue;	a global perspective
        In-Reply-To: <20141114063907.770E48BBA at digitalhumanities.org>

Dear Leonardo Pica Ciamarra,

Hmm, the title seems misleading: the article is not about digital humanities from a *global* perspective but from a *western* perspective.

Best,
Rens Bod
________________________________________
Van: humanist-bounces at lists.digitalhumanities.org [humanist-bounces at lists.digitalhumanities.org] namens Humanist Discussion Group [willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk]
Verzonden: vrijdag 14 november 2014 7:39
Aan: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
Onderwerp: [Humanist] 28.489 pubs: Digital Literary Studies; Bizet Catalogue;   a global perspective

                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 489.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

[...]
        Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 09:56:01 +0100
        From: Leonardo Pica Ciamarra <PicaCiamarra at ispf.cnr.it>
        Subject: "Digital Humanities from a global perspective"

Dear Humanist members,

Our e-journal "Laboratorio dell'ISPF" has just published the article by
Domenico Fiormonte, "Digital Humanities from a global perspective",
which could be of some interest for this list:
http://www.ispf-lab.cnr.it/article/2014_203_Abstract.

Regards,
Leonardo Pica Ciamarra

--
Leonardo Pica Ciamarra
Senior Researcher, Head of the Center for Digital Humanites
Istitute for the History of Philosophical and Scientific Thought
National Research Council
via Porta di Massa, 1 - 80133 Napoli I
email: picaciamarra at ispf.cnr.it

Centro di umanistica digitale: http://www.ispf.cnr.it/UmanisticaDigitale
Portale Vico: http://www.giambattistavico.it/en
Laboratorio dell'ISPF: http://www.ispf-lab.cnr.it



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 06:53:10 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: global perspective?
        In-Reply-To: <20141114063907.770E48BBA at digitalhumanities.org>

In response to the welcome news of Domenico Fiormonte's article "Digital 
Humanities from a global perspective", I wonder about what results from 
the undoubtedly laudable intention to gain a view of the entire world.

Allow me to go out onto a possibly weak analogical limb. In a very 
different context Paul N. Edwards, in "The World in a Machine: Origins 
and Impacts of Early Computerized Global Systems Models" (Systems, 
Experts, and Computers: The Systems Approach in Management and 
Engineering, ed. Hughes and Hughes), asks,

> How did 'the world' become a system? What kind of science made it
> possible to know the planet as a unit, to disentangle the vast array
> of interlocking forces that determine its characteristics as a
> system?  (p. 221)

What he shows for climatology is that, "As the grid scales of weather 
models and their time-steps began to shrink, as meteorologists sought to 
model the entire globe" the lack of uniform and so reliable data became 
the problem. Thus the computer "now also became a tool for refining, 
correcting, and shaping data to fit the models' needs" (p. 229).  In 
other words, the attempt to extend knowledge beyond ordinary terrestrial 
experience resulted in the model becoming the nature being modelled.

So I wonder further: can we get further than saying in effect, "This is 
what the world looks like from where I stand"?

Yours,
WM
-- 
Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
Humanities, King's College London, and Digital Humanities Research
Group, University of Western Sydney




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