[Humanist] 28.488 events: citizen history; treebanks; teaching; searching

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Nov 14 07:37:53 CET 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 488.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Stephen H. Gregg" <s.gregg at bathspa.ac.uk>                (30)
        Subject: Teaching digital humanities workshop, University of Reading

  [2]   From:    Adam Crymble <adam.crymble at gmail.com>                     (34)
        Subject: Digital History Seminar in London (Tuesday)

  [3]   From:    Verena Henrich <verena.henrich at uni-tuebingen.de>          (53)
        Subject: Call for participation: 13th Workshop on Treebanks and
                Linguistic Theories (Dec. 11-13)

  [4]   From:    Tessa Whitehouse <m.t.whitehouse at qmul.ac.uk>              (16)
        Subject: Searching and/as Knowing 24 November


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 11:04:07 +0000
        From: "Stephen H. Gregg" <s.gregg at bathspa.ac.uk>
        Subject: Teaching digital humanities workshop, University of Reading


Dear list

I hope the following might be of interest.

University of Reading will be hosting a workhop 'Teaching Digital
Humanities' on Wednesday, 10th December, 11am to 4pm, room 111, Palmer. It
will feature talks by Giles Bergel. Simon Rowberry, Andrew Burns, Matthew
Nicholls, and [cough] Stephen H. Gregg. See also the attached poster.

For more information or to book a place, contact Prof. Michelle F.
O'Callaghan <m.f.ocallaghan at reading.ac.uk>

Thank you.
Stephen

-- 
Dr Stephen H. Gregg
Senior Lecturer in English
Bath Spa University
Course Director, MA in Literature, Landscape and Environment
 http://literaturelandenvironment.org.uk/ 
Book, Text, Place 1500-1750 Research Centre
 http://booktextandplace.wordpress.com/ 

@gregg_sh
shgregg.com

T: +44 (0)1225 875482  M: +44 (0)7771 702912
Visit www.bathspa.ac.uk
Join us on: Facebook  http://www.facebook.com/bath.spa.university | Twitter
<https://twitter.com/#%21/BathSpaUni>| YouTube
 http://www.youtube.com/BathSpaUniversity | LinkedIn
 http://www.linkedin.com/company/bath-spa-university 
Newton Park, Bath, BA2 9BN

 Attachments:
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1415876822_2014-11-13_humanist-owner@lists.digitalhumanities.org_7364.2.docx




--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 11:34:03 +0000
        From: Adam Crymble <adam.crymble at gmail.com>
        Subject: Digital History Seminar in London (Tuesday)


Dear Humanists,

The Digital History Seminar at the Institute of Historical Research in
London warmly invite you to our next talk, by Mia Ridge, titled 'Citizen
History and its Discontents', which will be held this coming Tuesday.

For those of you who do not live in London, we'll be live-streaming the
event at (
http://ihrdighist.blogs.sas.ac.uk/2014/11/13/tuesday-18-november-citizen-history-and-its-discontents/
).

Full details below:

Title: Citizen History and its Discontents
Date:  18 November 2014
Time:  5:15 PM (GMT)
Venue:  Room 208, Senate House
Speaker: Mia Ridge (Open University)

Abstract: An increasing number of crowdsourcing projects are making claims
about ‘citizen history’ – but are they really helping people become
historians, or are they overstating their contribution? Can citizen history
projects succeed without communities of experts and peers to nurture sparks
of historical curiosity and support novice historians in learning the
skills of the discipline? Through a series of case studies this paper
offers a critical examination of claims around citizen history.

Speaker Biography: Mia Ridge's research focusses on historians and
scholarly crowdsourcing. Mia has published and presented widely on her key
areas of interest including: user experience design, human-computer
interaction, open cultural data, audience engagement and crowdsourcing in
the cultural heritage sector. Until December 2014, she is a CENDARI
 http://www.cendari.eu/  Visiting Research Fellow at Trinity College
Dublin, Ireland. Her edited volume, ‘Crowdsourcing our Cultural Heritage’
 http://www.miaridge.com/crowdsourcing-our-cultural-heritage/  (Ashgate) is
published in October 2014..

Adam Crymble
Lecturer of Digital History
University of Hertfordshire
a.crymble at herts.ac.uk



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 16:46:13 +0100
        From: Verena Henrich <verena.henrich at uni-tuebingen.de>
        Subject: Call for participation: 13th Workshop on Treebanks and Linguistic Theories (Dec. 11-13)



Call for Participation

13th International Workshop on Treebanks and Linguistic Theories (TLT13)
Tübingen, Germany; Friday-Saturday, December 12-13, 2014

Workshop website: http://tlt13.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/

List of accepted papers: http://tlt13.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/program/papers/

Associated event, co-located with TLT13: Current Trends in Language 
Technology and Linguistic Modeling (Dec. 11)

Website of associated event: 
http://tlt13.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/program/associated/

=======================================================

Workshop Description

The 13th International Workshop on Treebanks and Linguistic Theories 
(TLT13) will be held in Tübingen on 12-13 December, 2014. The historical 
Alte Aula of the University of Tübingen will serve as the venue for the 
workshop.

The TLT workshop series has proven successful in providing a forum for 
researchers in the field of Computational Linguistics who are experts in 
the design, creation and exploitation of annotated corpora and their 
relation to linguistic theories.

Treebanks have become crucial for the development of data-driven 
approaches to natural language processing, human language technologies, 
grammar extraction, and linguistic research in general. Many projects 
aim at compiling representative treebanks for specific languages. Other 
projects focus on the development of tools for the exploration of 
treebanks, develop annotation beyond syntactic structure and beyond a 
single language, and explore the usage of linguistic annotation for 
special areas of research in linguistics, or the Humanities, in general.

=======================================================

Invited Speakers

Sandra Kübler (Indiana University, Indiana, USA)
Gertjan van Noord (University of Groningen, The Netherlands)

=======================================================

Registration Information

Fees:
- Regular, early bird (until Nov. 20): 130 Euro
- Student, early bird (until Nov. 20): 80 Euro
- Regular, late: 150 Euro
- Student, late: 100 Euro

URL: http://tlt13.sfs.uni-tuebingen.de/local/registration/

For more information or questions, please contact: 
tlt13-local at sfs.uni-tuebingen.de

-- 
--
Verena Henrich
Seminar für Sprachwissenschaft
Universität Tübingen

Wilhelmstr. 19 (Raum 2.24)
72074 Tübingen
Germany

http://www.verenahenrich.de

Tel.: +49 (0)7071 2977313
Fax: +49 (0)7071 295214



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 17:43:05 +0000
        From: Tessa Whitehouse <m.t.whitehouse at qmul.ac.uk>
        Subject: Searching and/as Knowing 24 November


You are warmly invited to attend this seminar on Monday 24 November

"Searching and/as Knowing" with Prof. Lisa Gitelman

The QMUL Digital Humanities seminar is delighted to welcome Professor Lisa Gitelman, Distinguished Visiting Fellow in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at QMUL.
Time: 5.30pm
Place: ArtsTwo SCR (35 on this map; entrance via Westfield Way; the SCR is on the 4th floor)

Professor Gitelman is a media historian whose  research concerns book history, techniques of inscription, and the new media of yesterday and today. Her books include Scripts, Grooves, and Writing Machines (Stanford 1999), Always Already New: Media, History, and the Data of Culture (MIT 2006), and, most recently, Paper Knowledge (Duke 2014). She has also published the edited collections New Media, 1740-1915 (MIT 2003) and "Raw Data" Is an Oxymoron (MIT 2013).

The session, titled “Searching and/as Knowing”,  is aimed at questions of historical epistemology. How are ways of knowing culturally and historically contingent? How might we consider the ways that knowing might be changing amid the present ubiquity of digital tools? What is the best way to historicize search?

Prof. Gitelman will lead a discussion of recent two pieces that reflect on processes of knowing in a digital age, the discursive powers of the database, and the future of scholarship. To receive copies of the reading (short articles by Prof. Gitelman and Andrew Abbott), please contact m.t.whitehouse at qmul.ac.uk

Click here for the full seminar series programme for 2014-15

_______________________________

Dr Tessa Whitehouse
Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century Literature
School of English and Drama
Queen Mary, University of London
London E1 4HG
_______________________________





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