[Humanist] 28.60 how digital projects end

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed May 28 22:08:54 CEST 2014


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 60.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Wed, 28 May 2014 07:33:36 -0700
        From: Martin Holmes <mholmes at uvic.ca>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 28.58 how digital projects end
        In-Reply-To: <20140527231813.11C87665F at digitalhumanities.org>


Thanks to all for a really useful set of pointers. I don't know how I 
missed the DHQ issue!

A small supplementary question (in case it hasn't been answered in the 
long reading list I know have): What DH projects do you know of which 
have "ended well"? By this I mean: are no longer consuming any human 
effort at all, but remain accessible and useful, and promise to be so in 
the long term?

Cheers,
Martin

On 14-05-27 04:18 PM, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>                    Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 58.
>              Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>    [1]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (15)
>          Subject: how projects end
>
>    [2]   From:    James Smithies <james.smithies at canterbury.ac.nz>          (14)
>          Subject: RE:  28.55 how do digital projects end?
>
>    [3]   From:    Matthew Kirschenbaum <mkirschenbaum at gmail.com>            (43)
>          Subject: Re:  28.55 how do digital projects end?
>
>    [4]   From:    Susan Brown <sibrown at ualberta.ca>                         (78)
>          Subject: Re:  28.55 how do digital projects end?
>
>    [5]   From:    "Prescott, Andrew" <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>            (43)
>          Subject: Re:  28.55 how do digital projects end?
>
>    [6]   From:    { brad brace } <bbrace at eskimo.com>                        (30)
>          Subject: Re:  28.55 how do digital projects end?
>
>    [7]   From:    Alberto Santiago Martinez <asmartinez at colmex.mx>          (33)
>          Subject: Re:  28.55 how do digital projects end?
>
>
> --[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>          Date: Tue, 27 May 2014 08:49:26 +1000
>          From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>          Subject: how projects end
>
>
> Peter Galison's How Experiments End (1987) asks a somewhat different but
> related question: not only how the wrapping up (sometimes calling to a halt)
> is done by the experimenter but also about everything else that happens
> around the ending of projects and what happens to their results, written and
> constructed, afterwards. What happens to the ideas articulated in language
> and embodied in code? And, of course, the question of why the ending:
> because the objectives have been achieved? because the project ran out of
> money, and why that happened? For us the focus on *initiatives*, on the new,
> has not been entirely a good thing.
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
> Humanities, King's College London, and Research Group in Digital
> Humanities, University of Western Sydney
>
>
>
> --[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>          Date: Tue, 27 May 2014 02:17:32 +0000
>          From: James Smithies <james.smithies at canterbury.ac.nz>
>          Subject: RE:  28.55 how do digital projects end?
>
>
> Hi Martin,
>
> PRINCE2, developed for government purposes and widely used in the commercial world, does a good job of this. You can find handbooks in many university libraries, and there's information online too. The language can take a bit of getting used to, and I wouldn't recommend it for every project by any means, but the framework offers solid advice and asks to be tailored rather than offering a one-size-fits-all. The basic idea is that there's an art to closing a project properly (or even knowing when it's time to close it), just as there is to initiating and running one, and a range of activities that can be undertaken depending on size and scope. Some project managers specialise in closing projects, as it happens - it can take months with a large project, all in the interests of achieving as many 'benefits' as possible.
>
> I'm glad it's been raised on Humanist - it's a project phase that can achieve a lot with little expense, and could be used to introduce students to various aspects of technical project work. If anyone knows of advice in this area that's less oriented towards the government / commercial world I'd be interested to hear.
>
> Regards,
> James
>
> Dr. James Smithies
> Senior Lecturer in Digital Humanities
> Associate Director, UC CEISMIC Digital Archive
> University of Canterbury
> DDI: +64 3 364 2896
> http://dh.canterbury.ac.nz | http://ceismic.org.nz
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: humanist-bounces at lists.digitalhumanities.org [mailto:humanist-bounces at lists.digitalhumanities.org] On Behalf Of Humanist Discussion Group
> Sent: Tuesday, 27 May 2014 10:38 a.m.
> To: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
> --[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>          Date: Mon, 26 May 2014 22:57:46 -0400
>          From: Matthew Kirschenbaum <mkirschenbaum at gmail.com>
>          Subject: Re:  28.55 how do digital projects end?
>          In-Reply-To: <20140526223758.EDA8E666A at digitalhumanities.org>
>
>
> Hi Martin,
>
> I edited a cluster of essays on this topic ("Done") in DHQ 3.2:
>
> http://digitalhumanities.org:8080/dhq/vol/3/2/index.html
>
> On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 6:37 PM, Humanist Discussion Group <
> willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:
>
>>                    Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 55.
>>              Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>>
>>
>>
>>          Date: Mon, 26 May 2014 10:30:41 -0700
>>          From: Martin Holmes <mholmes at uvic.ca>
>>          Subject: Existing work on bringing digital projects to a close?
>>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I'm interested in learning about any previous published work which
>> directly addresses the issue of how you bring a digital project to a
>> definitive end. By this I don't mean the standard advice on how to
>> choose data formats that have a good chance of long-term support, or how
>> to get your metadata into central repositories; I'm interested in what
>> happens, or what should happen, if you decide that you're done with a
>> project and no more work will be done on it, and yet you want to do your
>> best to ensure that the project itself (not just the texts or the data
>> or the metadata, but also a web application that might run it, its
>> history, its documentation and so on) might have a good chance of
>> survival beyond the lifetime of the technologies and platforms on which
>> it happens to run. Does anyone know of good work in this area?
>>
>> Best regards,
>> Martin
>
>





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