[Humanist] 28.54 losing the plot by digital means

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue May 27 00:37:03 CEST 2014


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 54.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Mon, 26 May 2014 09:44:02 +0200
        From: maurizio lana <maurizio.lana at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 28.53 losing the plot by digital means
        In-Reply-To: <20140525220554.F2D77632F at digitalhumanities.org>


Il 26/05/14 00:05, Humanist Discussion Group ha scritto:
>                    Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 53.
>              Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>          Date: Sun, 25 May 2014 11:50:33 +1000
>          From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>          Subject: losing the plot by digital means, or here is some criticism for digital humanities
>
>
> Alan Liu has asked, "Where is the cultural criticism in the digital
> humanities?" (Debates in the Digital Humanities, ed. Gold). I've
> modified this question slightly but, I would argue, improved it by a
> simplifying enlargement: "where is the (indigenous) criticism in
> digital humanities?". Last year Tim Hitchcock, Professor at
> Hertfordshire and co-director of the Old Bailey Online, published
> the sort of criticism I wish we had more of: "Confronting the Digital:
> or How Academic History Writing Lost the Plot", in Cultural and
> Social History 10.11. I quote here the abstract:
>
>> This discussion piece argues that the design and structure of online
>> historical resources and the process of search and discover embodied
>> within them create a series of substantial problems for historians.
>> Algorithm-driven discovery and misleading forms of search, poor OCR,
>> and all the selection biases of a new edition of the Western print
>> archive have changed how we research the past, and the underlying
>> character of the object of study (inherited text). This piece argues
>> that academic historians have largely failed to respond effectively
>> to these challenges and suggests that while they have preserved the
>> form of scholarly good practice, they have ignored important
>> underlying principles.

"..., poor OCR, ...": the basis of a philologically sound work is the 
amount of attention devoted to every single word, would it be a single 
character. in digital not less than in print.

maurizio

-- 
Maurizio Lana - ricercatore
Università  del Piemonte Orientale, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici
piazza Roma 36 - 13100 Vercelli
tel. +39 347 7370925





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