[Humanist] 28.49 events: art & reproduction; experiment; DHC2014

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu May 22 23:04:43 CEST 2014


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 28, No. 49.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Dana Jalobeanu <dana.jalobeanu at GMAIL.COM>                  (6)
        Subject: RSA Berlin 2015 CFP: Early Modern Experiment and its
                Communities

  [2]   From:    "Prescott, Andrew" <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>            (33)
        Subject: The Work of Art in an Age of Digital Reproduction

  [3]   From:    Clare Mills <c.e.mills at sheffield.ac.uk>                   (51)
        Subject: DHC 2014 Call for Papers - Deadline Extended


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 22 May 2014 06:49:16 +0100
        From: Dana Jalobeanu <dana.jalobeanu at GMAIL.COM>
        Subject: RSA Berlin 2015 CFP: Early Modern Experiment and its Communities

Call for abstracts for the Renaissance Society of America conference in Berlin, March 26-28, 2015.

Early Modern Experiment and its Communities

Organizers: Dana Jalobeanu (University of Bucharest) and Cesare Pastorino (Center for the History of Knowledge and Technische Universität, Berlin)

Early modern experimentation took place in a wide variety of often overlapping disciplines, traditions and communities. At the same time, experimental practices and the very working definition of what counted as an experiment differed from one community to the other, being subject to received -and sometimes tacit- knowledge, practices and habits. Our sessions will investigate some of the very different environments where the rise of early modern experimental culture took place, specifically focusing on the ways in which communities shaped experimental practice and the notion of experiment. We welcome case studies from a variety of experimental groups and disciplines: to list but a few, early modern academies, networks of virtuosi, religious orders, physicians and apothecaries, naturalists, professors of secrets, alchemists, botanical experts, technical experimenters working in mines, arsenals, mints, ironworks, and so forth.

Please send a proposal of no more than 150 words (including keywords), plus a one page CV no longer than 300 words to Dana Jalobeanu (dana.jalobeanu at celfis.ro ) Cesare Pastorino ( cesare.pastorino at gmail.com ) by 4 June at the latest.




--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 22 May 2014 13:02:01 +0000
        From: "Prescott, Andrew" <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: The Work of Art in an Age of Digital Reproduction


The CHASE consortium together with the AHRC Digital Transformations theme is organising a free workshop on Saturday 31 May on ‘The Work of Art in an Age of Digital Reproduction’ . The programme is as follows:


King’s College London, Guy’s Campus, Lecture Room 2. New Hunt’s House, London SE1 1UL

Programme

10:00 Registration & coffee

10:30 Session 1: Walter Benjamin’s Work of Art in the Age of Technological Reproduction

• Andrew Prescott (King’s College London): The Digital Aura
• Neil Cox & Dana MacFarlane (Edinburgh): Workshopping Benjamin and Heidegger
12:30 Lunch

1:30  Session 2: The Age of Digital Reproduction

• Bronac Ferran (Royal College of Art): title tbc
• Elinor Carmi (Goldsmiths): Are you spam or not? The aura of authenticity in social network sites (SNS)
• Sarah Biggs (Courtauld Institute/British Library): Medieval Manuscripts in the Digital Age
• Sara Choudhrey (Kent): Islamic Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction

3:30 Tea

4:00 Keynote:  Mark Leckey: UniAddDumThs

Mark is a British artist and curator who works with collage, music, and film. His film Industrial Lights and Magic won the Turner Prize in 2008. He recently curated the show The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things, which explored the relationships between objects, digital avatars, and people, a configuration that he describes as ‘technoanimism’.

5:00 Reception

Preparation

Anyone interested in attending should register at: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/material-witness-the-work-of-art-in-an-age-of-digital-reproduction-tickets-11701171519

To make the most of the day, please read the following essays in advance (we’ll fix you up with the readings when you confirm your registration):

• Walter Benjamin, ‘The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility’, in Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings, Vol. 3, 1935-1938, ed. Howard Eiland and Michael W. Jennings (Harvard University Press, 2006), pp. 101-133.
• Martin Heidegger, ‘The Age of the World Picture,’ in The Question Concerning Technology and Other Essays, trans. William Lovitt (Harper Perennial, New York, 1977), pp. 115-154.

Professor Andrew Prescott FRHistS
Head of Department
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5RL
@ajprescott
www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/ddh http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/ddh
digitalriffs.blogspot.com http://digitalriffs.blogspot.com
+44 (0)20 7848 2651



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 22 May 2014 17:12:32 +0100
        From: Clare Mills <c.e.mills at sheffield.ac.uk>
        Subject: DHC 2014 Call for Papers - Deadline Extended


Dear all,

Due to continued interest we have decided to extend the deadline for
submitting proposals to midnight on 1 June. Further details below. 

Best wishes,

Clare


Digital Humanities Congress 2014
Call for Papers

The University of Sheffield's Humanities Research Institute with the support
of Centernet is delighted to announce its Call for Papers for a three-day
conference to be held in Sheffield during 4th - 6th September 2014.

The Digital Humanities Congress is a conference held in Sheffield every two
years. Its purpose is to promote the sharing of knowledge, ideas and
techniques within the digital humanities.

Digital humanities is understood by Sheffield to mean the use of technology
within arts, heritage and humanities research as both a method of inquiry
and a means of dissemination. As such, proposals related to all disciplines
within the arts, humanities and heritage domains are welcome.

The conference will take place at the University's residential conference
facility, The Edge.

Keynote Speakers

• Professor Laura Mandell (Director, Initiative for Digital Humanities,
Media and Culture, Texas A & M University) 
• Dr Fred Truyen (Associate Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Head of
CS/Digital Media Lab at the Institute for  Cultural Studies, KU Leuven) 
• Professor Paul Arthur (Professor of Digital Humanities, The University of
Western Sydney)

Submitting a proposal


Proposals for papers, sessions and posters should be submitted by email to
dhc2014 at sheffield.ac.uk
<mailto:dhc2014 at sheffield.ac.uk%3cmailto:dhc2014 at sheffield.ac.uk>  by
midnight on 1 June.

Download full guidelines for submitting a proposal (PDF)
http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/polopoly_fs/1.364638!/file/DHC-Call-for-Papers-20
14.pdf

Discounted registration

All successful proposers will be eligible for the early bird registration
packages. 

• Discounted full residential package incl. registration and ensuite bed and
breakfast accommodation: £240 (full price: £290)

• Discounted non-residential package: £129 (full price: £179)

• Student full residential package incl. registration and ensuite bed and
breakfast accommodation: £210

• Student non-residential package: £110


The conference website will be updated when online registration opens
Further details at: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/hri/dhc

 

 

 





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